Question about 1995 Land Rover Discovery

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Knocking noise when changing gear

I have had a new gear box fitted but it crunches when going up the box and down.Even if you change the gears slowly.

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  • vernon_goode Feb 27, 2009

    Adrian,

    I did fit new clutch, Will bleed the system in the next few days thanks for your help.

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  • Land Rover Master
  • 1,075 Answers

Your clutch is the problem,i would suspect master cyclinder??could have trapped air in the system needs air removed ie;bleeding;;;;;; {you did fit a new clutch when gear box was fitted}??? hope this helps.adrian

Posted on Feb 27, 2009

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1 Answer

Loud snapping noise heard when changing gears


From the way you've described it your gear stick linkages maybe on there way out. When changing gear does the car resist getting into gear?

If it's more of a crunching sound then I would try double de clutching, to do this you need to:
change gear as usual but instead of holding down the clutch throughout the gear change hold it down to take the vehicle into neutral then release the clutch then push the clutch down again and change into desired gear.
To change down it's basically the same principal but you push down the clutch to put the vehicle into neutral then push the throttle down just to pitch revs then release the throttle and push the clutch down to change into your desired gear, if it won't go in to gear easily then rather the throttle until it does.

You can go onto youtube and search for double de clutching and I'm sure some results will come up

hope this helps!

Apr 30, 2014 | 2004 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

Makes knocking noise that sound like something is loos banging only when jeep warms up and only in gear


TROUBLESHOOTING ENGINE NOISES
A KNOCKING SOUND IN THE ENGINE IS MOST LIKELY CAUSED BY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
1. PISTON SLAP: Makes a sharp metallic noise. Idle engine and short out each cylinder plug. The noise will disappear when plug with bad piston is shorted. Noise will also disappear at acceleration. This can be caused by worn or out of round cylinder, or broken piston ring. Correct problem by re-boring cylinder and/or replacing piston.
2. VALVE NOISE: Makes clicking or rattle noise. Caused by excessive wear on valve stem or lifter, out of adjustment, or stuck valve. Correct by adjusting valve clearance, replace worn valve or lifter, regrind cam, replace valve guide and /or valve. A stuck valve can sometimes be loosened by passing oil through the carburetor while engine is running.

3. ROD BEARING KNOCK: Makes sharp metallic noise similar to a piston slap. Detection is opposite of piston slap. Rod knock is not heard at idle. Knock becomes louder as engine speed is increased. Caused by excessive rod bearing clearance. Correct by adjusting rod bearing clearance to .0015 inches by removing shims. May require re-pouring rod bearing.
4. REAR MAIN BEARING KNOCK: Makes dull knocking or thud noise. Detected at speeds between 20 and 50 MPH. Knock will normally decrease or disappear while pulling or decelerating. Noise will be detected the loudest at normal driving speed, when not pulling or decelerating. Correct by adjusting bearing clearance to .001 to .0015 inches. If knock is excessive, crank should be checked for out of roundness. May need to re-pour all main bearings to correct.
5. TIMING GEAR KNOCK: usually the most difficult to diagnose. If gear is loose or badly worn it will knock in all ranges. Run engine slightly above idle speed. Slowly open and close throttle. Knock will continue to be present, but just as engine slows down knock will become a slight rattle. Remove timing pin and reinsert into timing hole on timing gear cover. Press timing pin tightly against timing gear and accelerate slightly above idle. Knock will significantly be reduced or disappear. Correct by replacing both timing gear and crank gear as a matched set. The two gears should have a backlash clearance of .003 to .004. If more than .009 inch backlash, an oversize (.005) timing gear should be installed.
6. WRIST PIN SLAP: This can not be detected by shorting out the cylinder plugs. Rapidly accelerate and decelerate the engine speed. The engine will pass through a certain speed range when the wrist pin will rattle at about the same pitch as a valve tappet noise. This can be corrected by installing a new wrist pin bushing in the rod or new wrist pin f badly worn. Wrist pin should fit the piston and connecting rod with a tight metal to metal fit. The pin can be pushed into the piston and rod with a slight pressure of the hand. Pin to rod clearance is .0003 to .0005 inches.

Dec 07, 2013 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Making knocking sound


A KNOCKING SOUND IN THE ENGINE IS MOST LIKELY CAUSED BY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
1. PISTON SLAP: Makes a sharp metallic noise. Idle engine and short out each cylinder plug. The noise will disappear when plug with bad piston is shorted. Noise will also disappear at acceleration. This can be caused by worn or out of round cylinder, or broken piston ring. Correct problem by re-boring cylinder and/or replacing piston.
2. VALVE NOISE: Makes clicking or rattle noise. Caused by excessive wear on valve stem or lifter, out of adjustment, or stuck valve. Correct by adjusting valve clearance, replace worn valve or lifter, regrind cam, replace valve guide and /or valve. A stuck valve can sometimes be loosened by passing oil through the carburetor while engine is running.

3. ROD BEARING KNOCK: Makes sharp metallic noise similar to a piston slap. Detection is opposite of piston slap. Rod knock is not heard at idle. Knock becomes louder as engine speed is increased. Caused by excessive rod bearing clearance. Correct by adjusting rod bearing clearance to .0015 inches by removing shims. May require re-pouring rod bearing.
4. REAR MAIN BEARING KNOCK: Makes dull knocking or thud noise. Detected at speeds between 20 and 50 MPH. Knock will normally decrease or disappear while pulling or decelerating. Noise will be detected the loudest at normal driving speed, when not pulling or decelerating. Correct by adjusting bearing clearance to .001 to .0015 inches. If knock is excessive, crank should be checked for out of roundness. May need to re-pour all main bearings to correct.
5. TIMING GEAR KNOCK: usually the most difficult to diagnose. If gear is loose or badly worn it will knock in all ranges. Run engine slightly above idle speed. Slowly open and close throttle. Knock will continue to be present, but just as engine slows down knock will become a slight rattle. Remove timing pin and reinsert into timing hole on timing gear cover. Press timing pin tightly against timing gear and accelerate slightly above idle. Knock will significantly be reduced or disappear. Correct by replacing both timing gear and crank gear as a matched set. The two gears should have a backlash clearance of .003 to .004. If more than .009 inch backlash, an oversize (.005) timing gear should be installed.
6. WRIST PIN SLAP: This can not be detected by shorting out the cylinder plugs. Rapidly accelerate and decelerate the engine speed. The engine will pass through a certain speed range when the wrist pin will rattle at about the same pitch as a valve tappet noise. This can be corrected by installing a new wrist pin bushing in the rod or new wrist pin f badly worn. Wrist pin should fit the piston and connecting rod with a tight metal to metal fit. The pin can be pushed into the piston and rod with a slight pressure of the hand. Pin to rod clearance is .0003 to .0005 inches.

Dec 06, 2013 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

V6 knocking noise


A KNOCKING SOUND IN THE ENGINE IS MOST LIKELY CAUSED BY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
1. PISTON SLAP: Makes a sharp metallic noise. Idle engine and short out each cylinder plug. The noise will disappear when plug with bad piston is shorted. Noise will also disappear at acceleration. This can be caused by worn or out of round cylinder, or broken piston ring. Correct problem by re-boring cylinder and/or replacing piston.
2. VALVE NOISE: Makes clicking or rattle noise. Caused by excessive wear on valve stem or lifter, out of adjustment, or stuck valve. Correct by adjusting valve clearance, replace worn valve or lifter, regrind cam, replace valve guide and /or valve. A stuck valve can sometimes be loosened by passing oil through the carburetor while engine is running.

3. ROD BEARING KNOCK: Makes sharp metallic noise similar to a piston slap. Detection is opposite of piston slap. Rod knock is not heard at idle. Knock becomes louder as engine speed is increased. Caused by excessive rod bearing clearance. Correct by adjusting rod bearing clearance to .0015 inches by removing shims. May require re-pouring rod bearing.
4. REAR MAIN BEARING KNOCK: Makes dull knocking or thud noise. Detected at speeds between 20 and 50 MPH. Knock will normally decrease or disappear while pulling or decelerating. Noise will be detected the loudest at normal driving speed, when not pulling or decelerating. Correct by adjusting bearing clearance to .001 to .0015 inches. If knock is excessive, crank should be checked for out of roundness. May need to re-pour all main bearings to correct.
5. TIMING GEAR KNOCK: usually the most difficult to diagnose. If gear is loose or badly worn it will knock in all ranges. Run engine slightly above idle speed. Slowly open and close throttle. Knock will continue to be present, but just as engine slows down knock will become a slight rattle. Remove timing pin and reinsert into timing hole on timing gear cover. Press timing pin tightly against timing gear and accelerate slightly above idle. Knock will significantly be reduced or disappear. Correct by replacing both timing gear and crank gear as a matched set. The two gears should have a backlash clearance of .003 to .004. If more than .009 inch backlash, an oversize (.005) timing gear should be installed.
6. WRIST PIN SLAP: This can not be detected by shorting out the cylinder plugs. Rapidly accelerate and decelerate the engine speed. The engine will pass through a certain speed range when the wrist pin will rattle at about the same pitch as a valve tappet noise. This can be corrected by installing a new wrist pin bushing in the rod or new wrist pin f badly worn. Wrist pin should fit the piston and connecting rod with a tight metal to metal fit. The pin can be pushed into the piston and rod with a slight pressure of the hand. Pin to rod clearance is .0003 to .0005 inches.

Dec 06, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Changed my 2001 vw polo 1.4 automatic transmission fluid and replaced with atf cvt but my car is now changing gears with a jerk please help


This sounds like a linkage issue? Can you clarify a few details, have you removed gear box? And when you say it changing gears like a ####? Is it a clicking noise or a crunching noise?

Oct 15, 2013 | 2001 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

My son has a '91 Pulsar, 5 door hatch. When he changes into reverse, the gear "grates", we beleive the clutch needs to be adjusted, is this correct? (he has no bother with any other gear...


When the engine is idling and the gear box selector is in Neutral all the internals of the gearbox are rotating. Pushing in the Clutch disconnects the drive from the engine to the gearbox but it takes a few seconds for the gears in the box to cease rotating. All the forward gears have synchromesh so there will be no crunching noise ifa forward gear is selected immediately the clutch is pushed in before allowing the gears to stop spinning. On the other hand Reverse has No synchros and therefore selecting reverse before waiting a few seconds for the gears to stop spinning will produce the crunching noise you have described.
So it pays to wait a second or two after pushing in clutch before Reverse is selected to minimise the crunch and if the clutch appears to be working correctly in normal driving ,then no adjustment is necessary.

Dec 22, 2010 | Nissan Pulsar Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 2004 audi s4 makes gronchy noise when i put it in to 2nd gear when cold whats causing it?


If I've understood your problem correctly.....when changing from 1st gear into second the box is giving a metal on metal crunching sound?
  • This would be the syncromesh ring which is not equalizing the speed correctly.
  • The problem usually happens when there is wear on the same part.
  • Check to make sure that the correct transmission fluid has been used in the box.
  • To alleviate the problem and delay the time when it will require attention, use the double de- clutch method of changing gears, especially when the transmission is cold.
  • The double de-clutch is carried out in the following way.
  1. When in gear and changing from 1st gear to 2nd, change into neutral and release the clutch and then depress again before selecting 2nd gear....It is not required to rev the engine in the neutral position when changing up....
  2. When changing down rev the engine when the shift lever is in neutral for each change.
You'll soon get the hang of it and stop the crunching sound, protecting the box at the same time....
Regards Johngee

Nov 13, 2010 | 2004 Audi S4

1 Answer

A jolt from the rear of the car when the auto gear box changes in low gear and a noise from the near side rear


jolt from the rear of the car when the auto gear box changes in low gear is a common fault in the older s types. most of the time is a sign of the gear box on its way out. is worth checking gear box oil level and oil quality though. noise from near side rear would probably be the damper rose joint which make a knocking noise when they wear.

Apr 21, 2010 | 2000 Jaguar S-Type

1 Answer

Gearbox spinning,with clutch depressed,gearbox crunching.


needs a new clutch ,pressure plate dragging caused by worn springs

Dec 30, 2008 | 2005 Renault 181

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