Question about 2005 Mazda 3

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2005 mazda 3 clutch won't engage

Gears seem to shift but clutch doesn't engage. Engine revs slightly and car surges slightly but won't move. Problem came up in 1 day.

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Relpace the clutch pressure plate and throwoout bearing. It all comes in a clutch kit.

Posted on Feb 18, 2009

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Car surging


Is the car equipped with the Automatic Transmission?
If so, read on.
Otherwise skip to the end and answer some questions.

POSSIBLE SCENARIO:
I have observed a condition where my car surges slightly when the torque-converter clutch (TCC) cycles between lock and unlock when driving on an uphill grade.
First some basics and history that will explain why the TCC is used.

Engine, Torque Converter, TCC, and Transmission relationship--
The TCC allows for a solid connection between the engine and transmission which allows the input to the transmission to rotate at the same speed as the engine.
Without a TCC, there is slippage between the engine and automatic transmission. The slippage is greatest at low engine RPM. That is what allows the engine to run with the automatic transmission in gear, like when you first shift into gear or stop at a stop sign. When the throttle pedal is depressed, the engine RPM begins to increase and the torque converter begins to slip less and less the more the engine RPM increases. The car moves. But even at cruising speeds the torque converter slips slightly. Engine RPM is greater than transmission input RPM, which is realized as slight decrease in fuel efficiency.
When acceleration is complete and a constant speed is being maintained, the engine power output is reduced to the point where the TCC can engage and eliminate any slippage between the engine and transmission. If the car has a tachometer the engagement of the TCC can be verified when a slight reduction in engine RPM observed without a corresponding change in vehicle speed.
One method used to test the operation of the TCC is as follows:
Find a flat section of road where it is safe to perform the test.
Reach a steady speed and keep the gas pedal depressed with one foot. While observing the tachometer (or listening for an increase in engine RPM), with the other foot depress the brake pedal enough to activate the break light switch but not enough to engage the brakes. When the brake light switch activates, the TCC receives a signal to disengage. With the gas pedal being held steady, release the brake pedal and the engine RPM should decrease when the TCC engages.
Old cars with Automatic Transmissions did not use a TCC. I believe the TCC was put in use in an attempt to increase fuel economy.

MY EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR SYMPTOMS
The condition that causes that issue on my car is this:
- A slight uphill grade increases the load on the engine.
The car tends to gradually slow and it is necessary to depress the gas pedal to maintain speed.
- Depressing the throttle pedal (manually, or automatically with cruise control engaged) signals the torque converter clutch to unlock when the load increases slightly. (A more drastic load increase would signal the Transmission to downshift to a lower gear.) The corresponding increase in engine RPM and output is enough to compensate for the reduction in speed. When the vehicle speed, engine RPM, and throttle position stabilize to the point that the TCC will engage and the engine RPM will reduce in correspondence with TCC engagement. Now, if the road conditions have not changed, power output is not enough to maintain vehicle speed. With the increased load caused by full engagement between engine and transmission, and the cycle (surging) repeats itself until the road conditions change.

Does that help?
If not:

QUESTIONS
Please define the symptoms.
What are the road conditions when the surge occurs? (A slight uphill grade?)
What is the frequency of the surge?
Does the engine power output have a noticeable surge?
Is there a speed change related to the surge?
Does the tachometer move up and down with little or no change in vehicle speed?
Are all instrument indication in the normal range?
What else has changed?

Good luck!

May 24, 2014 | Subaru Impreza WRX STi Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Noise when shifting gears


transmission synchronizers most common cause of transmisson noise in certain gears, and not others, might want to check the gear oil level. Transmission rebuild required. To read about them and what they actually do, then here is a good read:
When you shift gears in your standard shift car, you move a rod that moves a fork that engages the gear. Depending which gear you're shifting to, a different fork does the job. The fork moves the collar to the desired gear, and dog teeth on the collar mesh up with holes on the gear in order to engage it. You engage reverse gear through a separate, small idler gear. The reverse gear always turns in the opposite direction of the other (forward) gears.
In years past, double-clutching was common in order to disengage a gear, allow the collar and next gear to reach the same speed, and then to engage the new gear. To double-clutch shift, you pushed the clutch pedal to free the engine from the transmission. Then the collar moved into neutral. You released the clutch and revved the engine to get it to the right rpm value for the next gear so the collar and the next gear spun at the same rate to allow the dog teeth to engage the gear. When the engine hit the right speed, you depressed the clutch again in order to lock the collar into place on the next gear.
Modern cars use synchronizers in order to avoid the need for double-clutching. A synchronizer, or "synchro," lets the collar and gear synchronize their speeds while they're already in contact but before the dog teeth engage. Each manufacturer's synchro is slightly different than the others, but the basic idea is the same. For instance, a cone on one gear will fit into a cone-shaped depression on the collar. The gear and collar synchronize their speeds thanks to the friction between the cone and collar. Then the outer part of the collar moves out of the way so that the gear can be engaged by the dog teeth.

Dec 16, 2013 | Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1998 Honda civic ex won't move but the motor


Have you just replaced the clutch? Taken out the transaxle, and put it back in? Are you sure transmission was in good condition before this? If so, review your procedure carefully to be sure you got it all back right.
Watch the slave cylinder while someone depresses clutch. You should see the little plunger move slightly out and move the clutch lever back. The lever moves the release bearing inside bell housing into contact with the pressure plate. If slave cylinder doesn't move at all, try bleeding again. The plunger has to move when clutch is engaged.
I'm not sure what you mean by "will shift but won't go into gear". You mean it's actually going into a gear position and car won't move? Or it won't go into any gear, period. As if you had no clutch?

Nov 06, 2011 | 1998 Honda Civic

1 Answer

4 cyl car will "rev"


It sounds like either the clutch plate or pressure plate. Can you move the car in gear without too much trouble? Some resistance, but can be done! Then you will need to replace the clutch and pressure plates.

It is most likely suspects.

Aug 14, 2011 | 1994 Mazda MX-3

1 Answer

1986 Nissan Pickup


Shift fork may also be one of the reason! watch the shift fork while moving the clutch in and out.
1)The shift fork is near the clutch master cylinder on the tranmission housing. you should now move the fork left and right while the clutch is moved in and out. 2)From your query, it sounds to me that your clutch is not engaging and disengaging completely. 3) This is due to the air block. Make a bleeding process to blow the air out! 4)A broken shift fork will also prohibit the clutch from engaging/disengaging.

May 10, 2010 | 1986 Nissan Pickup 4WD 1986

2 Answers

How do I know when to replace the clutch on my 1999 Mazda Protege ES. Currently, it works, but I have to press the pedal all the way to the floor, with some force, to start the car. No check engine has...


whilst it works leave well alone ,when its slipping thats when you will need to replace the clutch,check the inhibitor switch on the clutch pedal though

Apr 16, 2010 | 1999 Mazda Protege

2 Answers

1992 3000GT Clutch


your clutch disk is worn out , need to replace assembly

Dec 19, 2008 | 1997 Mitsubishi 3000GT

2 Answers

98 Civic Auto Trans Slippage


you need to replace clutch pack for that gear can be ordered seperately from parts store or dealer if you want to save money call peach street auto recycling at 1800-365-2341 for a warrantied used one! also might be time for change trans filter and fluid filter could be slightly clogged but I lean towards clutch pack I replace these alot on Hondas

Dec 12, 2008 | 1998 Honda Civic

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