Question about 2005 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Engine over heats

When engine over heats the water hoses from radiator to engine look as though they are going to bust. Could it be the thermostat or water pump. How do you check for this.

Posted by on

  • John Weathers
    John Weathers May 11, 2010

    Does the cooling fan come on? When does it run hot in traffic or on the highway?

×

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 26 Answers

Sounds like your thermostat, without letting the fluid run through the engine, that particular hose is building pressure. Also check your radiator. If you remove the hoses from the top and bottom, shouldn't be but a hose clamp on each. Take your ordinary garden hose, and stick it in the top, and make sure water is flowing out the bottom. Make sure this is done safe. Get yourself 2 gallons of premix fluid, and before you take the hoses off, make sure you either take out the drain screw, or have a good drain pan available to catch the anitfreeze when it comes out. Don't want to hurt the poor animals.

Posted on Feb 14, 2009

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Overheating and no heat


With what you describe sounds like the hot water is just heating up but not circulating and cooling correctly. Possible causes, airlock, faulty water pump, check fan belt tension, not broken etc, blockage in engine water way or collapsed hose. Are you losing water at all? Head gasket?

Jan 10, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Lower radiator hose stays cold after running for hours


could be you fitted the thermostat in the wrong way around ,or the plastic impeller on the water pump with a steel drive shaft has failed they end up with the drive shaft spinning but the impeller is not turning ,go for the thermostat first though .

Feb 08, 2012 | 1991 Ford F150

2 Answers

My car overheats very easy.i can drive 1 exit on the highway and the temp goes up very fast. i dont know what it could be. there is always fluid in the reserve area and doesnt seem to be getting low or im...


COULD BE THERMOSTAT IF TOP RADIATOR HOSE IS NOT HOT AND BOTTOM RADIATOR HOSE GOING TO WATER PUMP IS HOT THE THERMOSTAT STICKING PARTIALLY CLOSE.IF TOP HOSE IS HOT THE RADIATOR,ENGINE BLOCK HEATER CORE NEED FLUSHING OUT.IF WATER PUMP WEEP HOLE LEAKING REPLACE WATER PUMP, FAULTY WATER PUMP WILL CAUSE ENGINE TO OVER HEAT.REPLACE RADIATOR CAP MAKE SURE YOU HAVE 50 / 50 MIX SOLUTION ANTIFREEZE AND WATER IN COOLANT SYSTEM. IF ALL LOOKS GOOD CHECK ENGINE OIL ON DIP STICK, IF OIL IN DIP STICK LOOK LIKE MILKSHAKE YOU HAVE BLOWED HEAD GASKET THAT WILL CAUSE ENGINE OVERHEATING WHILE DRIVING CAR IN SHORT DISTANCE AND ENGINE OVERHEATING.

Aug 16, 2011 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

I have a 1.8 liter 92 mitsubishi eclipse. I have already changed the radiator the head gasket and the water pump but it keeps overheating. I have also changed the thermostat and radiator cap. It still...


YOU NEED TO FLUSH THE RADIATOR AND CYLINDER BLOCK AND HEATER CORE.CHECK ENGINE OIL IN CRANK CASE IF LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE YOU HAVE A BLOWN HEAD GASKET.WHICH WILL CAUSE ENGINE TO OVER HEAT.

May 10, 2011 | Mitsubishi Eclipse Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I put new thermostat on and it started running very hot again. I drilled to holes in the thermostat to increase the water flow and it still ran hot. It's weird cause the bottom radiator hose was running...


Flushing a radiator at home is most often a waste of time. The chemicals used by a radiator shop are far stronger than anything you get at the parts supply house. What happens is that the flow you see is deceptive as the water tends to flow around a partial restriction and does nothing to remove it.
Though your garden hose has a lot of pressure it doesn't have the volume necessary. A garden hose will usually be sufficient to flush out a heater core though as it's smaller.
Have a radiator shop flush your radiator core and have a hydrocarbon test done on the cooling system to eliminate the possibility of head gasket problems. When re-filling the system, turn the engine off just before it reaches 210 degrees and let it sit for a few minutes so the thermostat can open, then continue filling. Always fill with the heat on high. Thermostat goes in with the spring end into the engine.Forget about the water pump...unless you got one made for a twin engine marine (CCW) application it has nothing to do with the problem though I've heard but never actually seen that the belt can be installed so it turns backwards.
When the engine is at operating temp cover the grille and force it to nearly go into overheat...the electric fan should come on and the mechanical fan should lock up to try to counteract that.
Don't open the system when it's hot (you found that out already). And, don't allow the engine to actually overheat.
My bet without seeing it? Likely a partially obstructed radiator. 4.0 engines make a lot of rust residue even when maintained. If that's what you have in there, or even the 4cyl. It is more than likely.

Jan 19, 2011 | 1989 Jeep Wrangler

2 Answers

Engine overheating, 2000 deville


The problem is that more heat is entering the water than is being extracted by the radiator.

But there can be a lot of causes for that. If you have a head gasket leak, it can introduce hot gasses into the water, increasing the heat load while raising the pressure in the cooling system. That in turn can push water out of the cooling system, and into the recovery reservoir, where it can't help with the cooling of the engine.

If the fins of the radiator are blocked or folded over, that part of the radiator will not contribute much to the cooling.

If the internal water passages of the radiator are blocked, the area of the radiator is effectively reduced.

A worn out bottom radiator hose can collapse from the suction of the water pump, blocking the water flow.

If the fuel mixture is too lean (not enough fuel in the given volume of air) the engine will generate quite a bit more heat, possibly overwhelming the system.

When the engine is cold, the thermostat (a valve in the hose where water exits the engine to go to the radiator) is closed. This prevents water from going to the radiator, and that in turn prevents water coming from the radiator to the engine.

Water instead leaves the engine through the heater hose near the upper radiator hose, and circulates right back to the inlet of the water pump. So the water circulated through the engine, but it has no way to shed any heat it picks up. This speeds up the warm-up process.

The water circulating this way passes by the back of the thermostat, causing the thermostat to warm up along with the water.

When the thermostat reaches its opening temperature, it starts to open, allowing some water to go out of the upper hose to the radiator, and therefore some water from the radiator to enter the engine.

Right away, the water in the engine falls below the opening temperature of the thermostat and it closes.

The newly cooled water gets warmed by the engine, raising it to the opening temperature of the thermostat, and the whole process begins again. But this time, the water coming from the radiator is just a little warmer.

Eventually, the thermostat will stay at a partially opened position where the cooling by the radiator just matches the necessary heat loss through the radiator.

If there is not enough water, the surface area of the radiator is effectively less.
If the radiator is blocked, or the fan is not working properly, the surface area of the radiator is effectively less.

If the thermostat doesn't open properly, the radiator is not sufficiently utilized.

If too much heat is generated by the engine, it can over heat (heavy load at low speed will make a lot of heat without spinning the water pump fast enough, for instance).

These are a few preliminary tests to see what's going on. With a stone cold engine, start it and let it idle. The heater hose leaving the thermostat area should begin to heat up but not the upper radiator hose.

Once the heater hose starts to become uncomfortably hot, the upper radiator hose should start to warm up, slowly at first.

If the heater hose does not heat up, there might be insufficient flow throw that part of the system.

There is a quick check a shop can perform to see if you have exhaust in the water. There is a syringe they can use to draw the vapor in the radiator through a sensing liquid. If it changes color, you have a head gasket leak.

The radiator cap only need to be replaced if it is letting the coolant move into the reservoir improperly. If you coolant level remains fine, that is probably not a problem.

Jun 20, 2010 | 2001 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Over heating, engine only, just had radiator replaced


Thermostat, is where top radiator hose connects / it could be that it is air locked /also could be water pump after removing the thermostat you should be able to see if water pump is circulating. if it was a used radiator ? it could be just as bad as the one you just changed / Have it flow tested .gallons Pier. minutes. also mack sure no kinks in hose./ let us know .Thank You.

Apr 05, 2010 | 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

2002 dodge 1500 Changed radiator, thermostat, and hoses. No heat


Why was radiator replaced?Did it have heat before ? If it was plugged, the heater core may also be plugged. Try flushing it with a water hose in both directions. I dont know why the botton radiator hose would be cold, the radiator should be a uniform temp and the air coming through the radiator should be HOT, when the engine is at operating temp. What condition was the old coolant? if it was rusty, the water pump may have lower flow than normal.

Nov 19, 2009 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

1 Answer

99 grand am gt overheating changed thermostat and


try priming the engine block & radiator with water though the hose's & any hose you can squeeze to pump out the air lock with the filler cap off when running, sounds too much air is is in the system & the pump won't work dry.
I had this problem a few times & I ended up practically forcing water into any hose I could re-attach quickly using a garden hose, as the heating system need's priming too !

Sep 21, 2009 | 1999 Pontiac Grand Am GT

3 Answers

Son and I replaced the radiator.son drove the car and it peged the temp gauge,he drove it home about a mile and a half.the next day I found that a hose was never tightend. Secured and filled,now the temp...


The thermostat has either failed shut or you failed to remove a transit blanking plug in the radiator before you fitted it

Remove the thermostat cover and take it out

You can run the car without a thermostat as their prime reason for being there is to warm the engine up quickly when the car first starts

Jul 03, 2009 | 2001 Buick Century

Not finding what you are looking for?
2005 Chevrolet Malibu Logo

Related Topics:

84 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chevrolet Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

63572 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21981 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

6812 Answers

Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...