Question about 2008 Chevrolet Impala

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Rear wheel Alignment

Rear wheels not straight, causing excessive wear on inboard part of tires. I have read many complaints concerning this on the internet. GM Bulletin exists to replace defective rear spindle rods, but on police vehicles only-#08032. It seems like every 07 and 08 models that I see, the rear wheels are visibly slanting outwards at the bottom. I purposely stopped at a dealer to look at 09 models, and it looks like the problem has been corrected for this model year. I took my recently purchased GM Certified Used Vehicle back to the dealer for repair. They claimed that they took the suspension apart and reassembled it to "specs". It still doesn't look right, obvious when I park it next to my other car. Any suggestions to make GM fix it under warranty?

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  • Anonymous Mar 14, 2009

    I have a 2008 impala ltz and have two four-wheel alignments in the past year. The rear tires still visibly tilt inwards at the top and are wearing the inside of the back tires. Have spent much money on new tires. Does this model require some kind of different method of alignment? No one seems to get it right.

  • pritchettc Mar 29, 2009

    About 6 months ago, I had 4 new tires put on my car. Then a month ago, I noticed how the back two tires were worn on one side. When I took the car back to the tire place, they stated that the rear alignment was out. He showed me, and it was extremely visible. This by the way, nulled my 85,000 mile warranty on the tires. I took my car straight to the shop to have the alignment done. Then I went 1 month later to replace the two rear wheels. When I picked up my car the guy said that the two worn tires were pulling the rear alignment back out. So, I took the car back to the shop to have it realigned. They won't even touch my car. Now, I have spent $800 on tires and alignment and the alignment is still out. This is going to ruin my two new tires ($250). I can't afford to drive the car at this rate.

  • Anonymous Apr 08, 2009

    Same problem on my SS. GM appears to be in denial about it. I have also found that the rear-end of car wants to hydro to the right on wet roads.

  • Bruce Bracey
    Bruce Bracey May 11, 2010

    Bill, What does the dealer propose to fix the issue?

    Let me know.

    Regards,

  • gene sewell
    gene sewell Dec 27, 2012

    ford focus had same problem you had to buy a 80 dollar spindal rod it was a factory defect but ford wouldn't homour that. the rod was a tich longer straightening the wheel .we went through so many tires untill a big o guy exsplained bought the part off the internet and it fixxed it.

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First of all Calling Gm wont do any good.Keep all documentation and start taking idiot mechanics to small claims court.I have done this many times due to faulty work.Judges hate mechanis.I have won evertime 3/3.I keep great records thogh.I have a 2008 Impala ss and I have the specs for alignment in front of me.Tire Plus told me that alignment was find and had to show them that it is simple math and the bright red numbers under actual on the toe are telling you to look at it its off.The problem is you have to take the car to a place that actually has Mechanis aligning the car.Most shops use alignment techs which basicakky means hello I am a moron I will mess your car up worse,because I am an idiot.If its not right demand a refund.Also demand before and after specs.Even though the numbers might be in specs,If the numbers on each side dont match closlet the car will still not drive corrctly.

Posted on Feb 18, 2010

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  • Chevrolet Master
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Other than going to the service desk and blowing a hemorage, You can contact GM customer service and see if they will help. Otherwise, find out where rear camber adjustments are and change it yourself. It. usually is not too difficult.

Posted on Feb 12, 2009

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Vibrates at 35mh


Wheel alignment and tire balance are the first place to look. if you feel vibrations in the seat. the rear wheels are the fist place to check. if vibrations are present through the steering wheel, then front tire alignment and tire balance are probably the cause. or something suspension or steering related. Even uneven wear on tires can cause this. but uneven wear is the sign of another problem, tracing back to suspension or steering problems.

Oct 29, 2013 | 1989 Mercury Grand Marquis

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Keep your tires in good lasting shape


Did you ever see the statements in the tire dealer shops stating a specific tire model will last approx. 50-75,000 miles/
This will never happen unless you have your tires rotated every 7500 miles, the front tires wear excessively compared to the rear tires in 90% of the cars/trucks.
Why? Because the front tires in most cases are the drive tires(front wheel drive) causing the front tires to ocasionally spin causing excessive wear and also the front tires are the ones that guide your vehicle down the road, when you turn the steering wheel you are turning the front tires to make the car go in the direction you want thus causing more excessive wear to the front tires, in order to get even wear from front to back tires one must move the front tires to the back tires at 7500 mile intervals, making sure the tires only get rotated to the same side of the car each and every time, if you move a right rear tire to a left front position, severe damage may occur so please keep them same side rotations.
Also have your wheel alignment checked at a tire shop each time you bring it in for a wheel/tire rotation as pot holes, hitting curbs,etc all can effect the way the tires wear if the alignment goes out.

on Jun 06, 2010 | Chevrolet Malibu Cars & Trucks

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Understand your vehicles alignment


Your vehicle's alignment - Tire Service
What is alignment?
Alignment refers to the way your car's wheels are positioned. Your wheels should be parallel and facing forward.

How does alignment affect my vehicle?
When your wheels are properly aligned, you'll get better gas mileage, your tires will last longer, steering will be easier, and your ride will be smoother and safer.

What could go wrong with my alignment?
(If your car has Air ride or air suspension, Please go here)

Several factors could contribute to a shift in alignment including old, worn-out components and poor road conditions, resulting in a few different problems including Camber, Toe and Caster, and if any of these problems develop, they will take a toll on your vehicle's tires, performance and manageability.

Camber
The wheels are tilted, either inward or outward. This will create pulling and tire wear.

Toe
A change in the distance between the front and back of the front or rear tires. This will wear on the tires, too.

Caster
A backward or forward tilt at the top of the wheel's spindle support arm. This will cause either loose or difficult steering.

If any of these problems develop, they will begin to take their toll on your car's tires and performance, as well as steering
How will I recognize a problem with my alignment?
Check your steering wheel when you're driving. Does it stay straight? Does it vibrate? When you are traveling along a straight road, does your vehicle pull to one side? Is your steering loose, or difficult to control? Have you noticed uneven tire wear?

Check your tires periodically using this chart. A number of different things can affect your tires - from alignment to suspension components to improper inflation of tires. If you recognize any of these symptoms, bring your car in for a free inspection.
How will The Wright Import,Cumming Georgia fix my alignment?
As a general rule, you should have your alignment and related components checked every 10,000 miles or once a year, and there are three types of alignment jobs with a good-better-best approach.

GOOD
Two-wheel geometric centerline alignment.

This adjusts the toe on your front wheels only. This will work only if your rear wheels are properly aligned. (Used mostly on trucks and older rear-wheel drive cars).

BETTER
Four-wheel thrust line alignment.

This aligns the front wheels to the rear-wheel alignment.

BEST
Complete four-wheel thrust line alignment.

This is the optimal approach: aligning all wheels straight ahead and parallel.

After a thorough review of your alignment, your The Wright Import technician will present you with the findings and all of your options before beginning any work on your vehicle.

on Apr 17, 2010 | Chevrolet Avalanche Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Rear wheels toeing in at top wearing inside of tyre


Your car needs a Rear Wheel Alignment, the components need to be inspected/checked for wear and then aligned. Worn ball joints, wheel bearings and so forth can cause bad alignment & tire wear.
Also it's hard to get an accurate alignment once a tire is worn on the inside or outside of the tread.

Aug 24, 2011 | Audi A4 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I want to know how to fix the alignment on my 1995 honda accord ex.


Before making wheel alignment adjustment, perform the following checks:
  1. Tires should be equal in size and runout must not be excessive. Tires and wheels should be in balance, and inflated to manufacturer's specifications.

  2. Wheel bearings must be properly adjusted. Steering linkage and suspension must not have excessive looseness. Check for wear in tie rod ends and ball joints.
  3. Steering gear box must not have excessive play. Check and adjust to manufacturer's specifications.
  4. Vehicle must be at curb height with full fuel load and spare tire in vehicle. No extra load should be on vehicle.
  5. Vehicle must be level with floor and with suspension settled. Jounce front and rear of vehicle several times and allow it to settle to normal curb height.
  6. If steering wheel is not centered with front wheels in straight-ahead position, correct by shortening one tie rod adjusting sleeve and lengthening opposite sleeve equal amounts.
  7. Ensure wheel lug nuts are tightened to torque specifications
Ride Height Adjustment

Before adjusting alignment, check riding height. Riding height must be checked with vehicle on level floor and tires properly inflated. Passenger and luggage compartments must be unloaded. Bounce vehicle several times, and allow suspension to settle. Visually inspect vehicle from front to rear and from side to side for signs of abnormal height.
Measure riding height. See figure. Riding height between left and right sides of vehicle should vary less than 1′ (25.4 mm). If riding height is not within specification, check suspension components and repair or replace them as necessary.
Wheel Alignment Procedures

Honda recommends using commercially available computerized 4-wheel alignment equipment. Follow equipment manufacturer instructions to obtain vehicle alignment settings. Use following procedures for necessary adjustments.
Civic Camber Adjustment
Compare camber settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If camber is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck camber.
Civic Caster Adjustment
DO NOT use more than 2 shims. If more than 2 shims are required to adjust caster angle, check for bent or damaged suspension components.
Compare caster settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If caster is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck caster.
Civic Toe-In Adjustment

  1. Secure steering wheel in straight-ahead position. Measure front wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, loosen tie rod lock nuts. Turn both tie rods equally in the same direction until front wheels are in straight-ahead position and toe-in reading is correct. Tighten tie rod lock nuts. Reposition tie rod boots if twisted.
  2. Ensure parking brake is released. Check rear wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, hold adjusting bolt on rear compensator arm and loosen lock nut. See figure. Adjust rear toe-in by sliding rear control arm until rear toe-in is correct. Install NEW lock nut, and tighten it while holding adjusting bolt.
Wheel Alignment Specifications

  • Camber - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0 (range -1 to 1)
    • Rear: 0.33 (range -1.33 to 0.67)
  • Caster - Measurement in degrees.
    • 1.17 (range 0.17 to 2.17)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in inches (mm).
    • Front: -0 (0)
    • Rear: 0.08 (2.0)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0.00 (range - 0.16 to 0.16)
  • Toe-Out On Turns - Measurement in degrees.
    • Inner: 41.00
    • Outer: 33.50
Torque Specifications Ft. Lbs (N.m)

  • Rear Control Arm Adjusting Bolt: 48 (65)
  • Spindle Nut: 136 (185)
  • Tie Rod Lock Nut: 41 (55)
  • Wheel Lug Nuts: 80 (108)
hope this helps you out.

May 09, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

Tip

Should I worry about my vehicle's alignment


Alignment refers to the way your car's wheels are positioned. Your wheels should be parallel and facing forward.

How does alignment affect my vehicle?
When your wheels are properly aligned, you'll get better gas mileage, your tires will last longer, steering will be easier, and your ride will be smoother and safer.

What could go wrong with my alignment?
Several factors could contribute to a shift in alignment including old, worn-out components including Ball Joints, Control arm bushings, and poor road conditions, resulting in a few different problems including Camber, Toe and Caster, and if any of these problems develop, they will take a toll on your vehicle's tires, performance and manageability. Worn out shocks and struts can also be a serious problem with un-even tire wear.


Camber
The wheels are tilted, either inward or outward. This will create pulling and tire wear.


Toe
A change in the distance between the front and back of the front or rear tires. This will wear on the tires, too.


Caster
A backward or forward tilt at the top of the wheel's spindle support arm. This will cause either loose or difficult steering.



If any of these problems develop, they will begin to take their toll on your car's tires and performance, as well as steering

How will I recognize a problem with my alignment?
Check your steering wheel when you're driving. Does it stay straight? Does it vibrate? When you are traveling along a straight road, does your vehicle pull to one side? Is your steering loose, or difficult to control? Have you noticed uneven tire wear?


Check your tires periodically. A number of different things can affect your tires - from alignment to suspension components.
As a general rule, you should have your alignment and related components, such as ball joints, control arm bushings, checked every 10,000 miles or once a year, and there are three types of alignment jobs with a good-better-best approach.

GOOD
Two-wheel geometric centerline alignment.
This adjusts the toe on your front wheels only. This will work only if your rear wheels are properly aligned. (Used mostly on trucks and older rear-wheel drive cars).

BETTER
Four-wheel thrust line alignment.
This aligns the front wheels to the rear-wheel alignment.

BEST
Complete four-wheel thrust line alignment.
This is the optimal approach: aligning all wheels straight ahead and parallel.

After a thorough review of your alignment, your The Wright Import technician will present you with the findings and all of your options before beginning any work on your vehicle.

What is a wheel alignment? How does it effect handling and tire wear? When should I do an alignment? What causes alignments to go out? How would I know if my alignment is out?

A wheel alignment is nothing more than setting the angle of the hub/wheel so it tracks in the right direction. Most vehicles have four-wheel alignments, meaning each of the four wheels is separately aligned. Your basic alignment consists of three angles: camber, caster and toe-in. Camber is the tilt of the tire when viewed from the front of the car. Positive camber means the top of the tire is tilted away from the car. Negative camber means the top is tilted in. Camber has a lot to do with cornering performance. Too much negative camber will wear the inside of the tires prematurely. Too much positive camber will wear the outside tread.

Caster is the inclination of the front spindle. Picture the angle of the forks on a bike top to bottom. When the caster is out, it creates a pull or wandering condition and sometimes a slow responding steering wheel. Toe-in is measured in inches or degrees. Viewing from the front of the car, it is the difference between the front and rear center-line of the tire. Toe-in means the fronts of the tires are closer together. Toe-out means, the fronts of the tires are farther apart. Toe-in or out has the most effect on tire wear.

When your car is out of alignment, the tires will wear prematurely. In some extreme cases, new tires will be gone within 500 miles. At the price of tires, especially high performance tires with soft compounds, you want to keep your vehicle in alignment as long as possible. Other symptoms of an out-of-alignment car are poor handling, pulling to one side, or wandering from side-to-side. An alignment will also affect the steering wheel response and how quickly it returns to the center.

Your vehicle's alignment should be checked every 10,000 to 12,000 miles. Any harsh impact such as potholes, curbs, objects in the road, or the damage of an accident, should prompt you to have your alignment checked. If you do any modifications to your suspension, raising or lowering your car, that will affect the alignment angles. Even changing the tire size will effect the alignment. Loose, worn or bent suspension parts such as ball joints, springs, bushings, and control arms will have an adverse affect on your alignment, too. In most cases you do not know if your alignment is out. The best way to check it is with a precision alignment machine. Laser optics combined with a computer allow for the most accuracy in alignment readings.

Remember you are aligning the hub of your vehicle. Check to see if the alignment shop or dealer has equipment that attaches to the hub, not the wheel. Many independent shops that do alignments have a specialty tool called "Tru Align" that attaches to the hub. This will make for a much more accurate alignment with the added bonus of not damaging the delicate finish on your wheels.

There is a lot more to suspension alignment, especially if you push your vehicle on the track. The modifications you make on your suspension are just the beginning. Once you start down this road you will be concerned with things like bump steer, weighting (vertical load), pre-loading, tire traction versus tire load, and more. Now you're thinking under-steer, over-steer, tire compound, sway bar design, and other topics that can be covered in a later article. For now, just remember to have your vehicle aligned every 10,000 to 12,000 miles in normal driving conditions.
If you accidentally hit a curb, or drive through a nasty pothole or other road obstruction, that would be a cue to have your car's alignment checked more often. Proper alignment is good for your car. It will save unnecessary wear on your tires. It will ensure that your vehicle is giving you the handling the factory designed the car to have. And, most importantly, a properly aligned car is safer and more fun to drive. Have your alignment, ball joints and suspension checked regularly checked regularly

on Dec 11, 2009 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

The tires are wear out on the inside and dishing on the outside, is this a sign of wore out struts causing the front to be out of line. What is the fix needed replacw struts in front and new tires


Wearing on the inside can be caused by an excessive camber angle or excessive toe out, or both. Either of these can be caused by worn or damaged suspension parts. Camber affects Caster, and Camber and Caster affect Toe. Toe affects the Thrust Angle. (These are the major suspension angles involved in wheel alignment) The "dishing" or "cupping" is caused by what is sometimes called "wheel-hop" this can be caused by worn-out struts or shocks and can also be caused by tires that are seriously out of balance.

The recommended "Fix" would be to inspect the ENTIRE suspension system to check for loose and/or worn and/or damaged parts. Replace any of these parts as necessary. Then replace and balance the tires and head straight over to the alignment shop to have all of your suspension angles set to manufacturer's specifications. (Most tire stores also have an alignment machine)

Apr 10, 2011 | Chevrolet Blazer Cars & Trucks

6 Answers

2007 Impala rear tire wear due rear wheel spindle rods


Nick52284,
I have gone thru 3 sets of good tires now. Tires lasting from 10-12k miles before they hit cords. This is after the dealer does an alignment to spec. Funny thing is I have never seen the alignment specs from the dealer, I only get "aligned to spec". My wear is on the inside of the tires just as described in the police bulletin. I have tried different brands each time and get the same result (wear to the cords in 6 months or less). The bulletin only applies to the police version becasue GM doesn't want the bill for the thousands of ordinary customers repairs. There are enough complaints of this exact thing on any Chevy site that you can find. We aren't all nimrods.

You may be a guru, but I think you don't know what you are talking about.

Paul

Jul 31, 2009 | 2008 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Excessive tire wear on front right wheel only


re alignment point to toe in-out

Mar 29, 2009 | 2002 Volvo S60

2 Answers

Tire wear


does the car make noise from the rear when you go at a high speed. If it does it may be your bearings. I had my bearing wear out on me at 15000 miles.

Jun 27, 2008 | 2005 Ford Focus

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