Question about 2001 Pontiac Grand Am SE

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How to change a heater core

Changed two thermostats, intake manifold gasket, both radiator hoses, water pump. Was done i thought i was good to go then drove home and smelt coolant, and was getting cold air, i bled the bleeder what next heater core?

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  • Anonymous Mar 18, 2014

    or the smaller hose going back to the manifold

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Hi try this save to file then zoom in.how to change a heater core - 6332883.jpg

Posted on Feb 06, 2009

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I have a 2004 model Toyota voxy and the temperature light sometimes come on and it consumes coolant.Put in a new radiator with fan changed the thermostat and sensor but still have same problem.


if it consumes fluid only two ways a leak or burning it ---look for leaks -dried /damaged hoses- reservoir -radiator cap-water pump-heater core -- have a pressure test done of system ----burning coolant would mean problem with --possible head gasket--intake gasket -damaged head

Jul 11, 2016 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

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Intake Manifold gasket replacement and/or leaking= Ford


Intake Manifold gasket~

Replacing intake manifold gasket:
Replacing the intake manifold gasket, I used the tube kind, it's a make it youself for about $6 (it's blue and the consistancy of toothpaste) follow directions carefully! You can get a tube at Autozone or any car parts store. Has been working great. Just ask the cashier for the make it yourself kind of intake manifold gasket. Sorry, I don't remember the name of it, it's been that long...lol...

As for the Intake Manifold leaking coolant....It could, but shouldn't. One of the largest problems I've seen for coolant to leak out the Intake Manifold has been due to pressure in the system somewhere... Check the classic area:
Water pump- look for either water seapage and/or coolant. You'll know if it is because you will see real water either coming out of the water pump leak hole or under the thermostat. Most of the time coolant will pool where your heater hose runs in the intake manifold.

Mentioning heater hose. Check for leaks, holes, and/or cracked heater hoses. In-addition to the water pump, heater hoses...Check the transmission system, exhaust system, fuel system, radiator system, A/C system, secondary fan (located above the water pump housing), and thermostat.Also, check all electrical connections....Hummm....This is almost the entire workings of the vehicle.

NOTE: "It seems to be an infinity kinda thing... Once one thing starts to fail and is ignored, you are bound to be fixing a chain of event failures. Therefore, Do not ignore even the smallest problem or you'll be bound for life in repairs...."

on Jun 25, 2010 | Ford Expedition Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why overheatin since changed water pump, hoses, thermostat and head gasket


Clean or have a radiator shop clean or replace your radiator core.

Aug 19, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Heater fan blows good but only blows cold air. Is it the heater core? The thermostat? How hard are they to replace if i do it myself?


Check the heater core by checking the hotness or coldness of the 2 tubes at the firewall that lead to the heater core.

If both tubes are hot, the heater core is fine. If both tubes are cold, then the heater core is plugged up and will have to be flushed out or replaced.

The thermostat, if stuck open, will delay the heating up of the heater core. It's not hard to replace the thermostat.

Thermostat Removal & Installation 4.2L Engine To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Some of the coolant
    • The upper radiator hose f150_42_thermostat.gif

    • The bolts (A).
    • The water outlet connection (B)
    • The water thermostat and paper gasket assembly (C)
To Install:
NOTE: The water thermostat is indexed and must be installed correctly.
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • The water thermostat
    • The thermostat
    • The water outlet adapter
    • The bolts
      1. Torque to: 80 inch-lbs (9 Nm)
    • The upper radiator hose
    • The coolant
4.6L/5.4L Engines To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Some of the coolant
    • The upper radiator hose f150_46-54_thermostat.gif

    • The bolts (A)
    • The water outlet connection (B)
    • The water thermostat
    • The O-ring (discard)
To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • A new O-ring to position the water thermostat in the upper intake manifold
    • The water outlet connection onto the upper intake manifold
    • The bolts
      1. Torque to: 18 ft-lbs (25 Nm)
    • The upper radiator hose
    • The coolant
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Jan 28, 2011 | 1997 Ford F150 Regular Cab

2 Answers

My van still shows sign off over heating according to my thermostat but recently replaced water pump and radiator


the 4.3 engine has a problem with leaking intake manifold gaskets. check for leakage behind the water pump. did you change the thermostat? This controls the engine temp. check for rusty radiator cap and replace if worn

Nov 06, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Astro

1 Answer

Overheating caddy! Restricted flow from the top of the block. What I have done. New thermostat, engine coolant sensor, New hose's top, bottom and by passed heater core. Removed all hose's and radiator...


you don't say what year caddy. but older models (especially the 4.1L) did have a problem with intake manifolg blockages and gasket leaks. if that sounds like it could be your problem try replacing the intake manifold gasket, and clean out the inside of the manifold while it's off either manually, or by having it put in an acid vat at a rebuild shop or napa center

Sep 08, 2010 | Cadillac Eldorado Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

Overheating


maybe 3 things....leaking intake manifold gasket(very common on this car because pontiac used plastic manifold gaskets) may also be air in the system....bleed screw is located on the top hose and is painted blue. it may have some air cavitation. you may have a leaky or bad seal on overflow cap. check your oil dip stick...if there is a milk shake type foam look to it then the gaskets are ready to fail. get a compression test done and it will confirm everything the easy way. harbor freight sells a radiator pressure test kit and it works like a champ and its cheap....good luck

Jan 06, 2010 | 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix

2 Answers

I have a 1990 gmc 1500 5 speed that is overheating and leaking coolant i changed the radiator hoses,thermostat, and water pump, and i know the leak is not coming from the radiator what do i do next?


any external leaks?coolant stains? would check the intake for signs of leakage also the heater hose quick connect.also check the sides of the block for leakage from the core plugs.

Jan 02, 2010 | 1990 GMC C1500

1 Answer

Overheating 97 V6 pontiac grand am


1 Inspect Cooling System Mix Coolant level low or flow is restricted. grey_line.gif 2 Inspect Belt Incorrectly routed, adjusted, tensioned, missing, or worn water pump belt(s). grey_line.gif 3 Inspect Oil Pan Gasket - Performance Ruptured, cracked or leaking radiator hose. grey_line.gif 4 Inspect Radiator Cap Worn or damaged radiator cap grey_line.gif 5 Inspect Thermostat Thermostat stuck closed grey_line.gif 6 Inspect Fan Blade Broken, missing, or defective fan blade(s). grey_line.gif 8 Inspect Water Pump Damaged, worn or leaking water pump. grey_line.gif 9 Inspect Intake Manifold Plenum - Perform Leaking water pump gasket. grey_line.gif 10 Inspect Cooling Fan Control Faulty cooling fan control or circuit. grey_line.gif 11 Inspect Cooling Fan Switch - Radiator Faulty radiator cooling fan switch or circuit. grey_line.gif 12 Inspect Engine Temperature Sensor Faulty engine temperature sensor or circuit. grey_line.gif 13 Inspect Temperature Switch Damaged or faulty temperature switch or temperature switch circuit. grey_line.gif 14 Inspect Fan Clutch Worn, loose or faulty fan clutch. grey_line.gif 15 Inspect Ported Vacuum Switch Damaged, leaking, or faulty ported vacuum switch. grey_line.gif 16 Inspect Radiator Obstructed radiator core or radiator cooling fins. grey_line.gif 17 Inspect Head Gasket - Performance Head gasket leaking coolant into cylinders

Dec 01, 2008 | 1997 Pontiac Grand Am

2 Answers

My daughter's 1997 Saturn is leaking coolant and overheating..


Coolant leaks can occur anywhere in the cooling system. Nine out of ten times, coolant leaks are easy to find because the coolant can be seen dripping, spraying, seeping or bubbling from the leaky component. So open the hood and visually inspect the engine and cooling system for any sign of liquid leaking from the engine, radiator or hoses. The color of the coolant may be green, orange or yellow depending on the type of antifreeze in the system. The most common places where coolant may be leaking are:Water pump. A bead shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.Radiator. Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, as is the area where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. But a major factor in many radiator leaks is internal corrosion that eats away from the inside out. That's why regular coolant flushes and replacing the antifreeze is so important.
oses. Cracks, pinholes or splits in a radiator hose or heater hose will leak coolant. A hose leak will usually send a stream of hot coolant spraying out of the hose. A corroded hose connection or a loose or damaged hose clamp may also allow coolant to leak from the end of a hose. Sometimes the leak may only occur once the hose gets hot and the pinhole or crack opens up. Freeze plugs (casting plugs or expansion plugs in the sides of the engine block and/or cylinder head). The flat steel plugs corroded from the inside out, and eventually eat through allowing coolant to leak from the engine. The plugs may be hard to see because they are behind the exhaust manifold, engine mount or other engine accessories. On V6 and V8 blocks, the plugs are most easily inspected from underneath the vehicle.
Heater Core. The heater core is located inside the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit under the dash. It is out of sight so you can�t see a leak directly. But if the heater core is leaking (or a hose connection to the heater core is leaking), coolant will be seeping out of the bottom of the HVAC unit and dripping on the carpet. Look for stains or wet spots on the bottom of the plastic HVAC case, or on the passenger side floor.
Intake Manifold gasket. The gasket that seals the intake manifold to the cylinder heads may leak and allow coolant to enter the intake port, crankcase or dribble down the outside of the engine. Some engines such as General Motors 3.1L and 3.4L V6 engines as well as 4.3L, 5.0L and 5.7L V8s are notorious for leaky intake manifold gaskets. The intake manifold gaskets on these engines are plastic and often fail at 30,000 to 80,000 miles. Other troublesome applications include the intake manifold gaskets on Buick 3800 V6 and Ford 4.0L V6 engines.
INTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS
There are the worst kind of coolant leaks for two reasons. One is that they are impossible to see because they are hidden inside the engine. The other is that internal coolant leaks can be very expensive to repair.


visit for more info:

http://www.aa1car.com/library/coolant_leaks.htm

Nov 24, 2008 | 1996 Saturn SL

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