Question about 1996 BMW 318

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Leaking coolant from engine..

I bought a bmw 318is.iv changed the clutch fan,thermostat and the radiator.
now its leaking coolant from the engine,i dont know where,and is overheating when moved less than a mile.

im frustrated.

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Unfortunately, This Problem is Going to Be Either a Blown Head Gasket or a Cracked Block. Just in Case, Check all the Hoses and Check and see if your Model Has a Transmission Cooler Installed, Hopefully on of these is the Culprit. Please Rate My Response! Thanks!

Posted on Feb 02, 2009

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Bmw troubleshooting


change coolant jug also check thermostat as well as radiator for leaks ,,,check coolant levels and fan motors inside and under hood

Oct 23, 2013 | BMW Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Have bmw 320i 2001 only 55570 miles. even driving after 10 miles engine get hot. no problems with driving , no warning light but it stays hot even after2 hours. please need advice. car was checked


This bmw is overheating , even after 2hrs, the engine will still be hot after it verheats. the basic thing to do first is to allow the engine to cool down 5-6 hours or even overnight.then check to see if the cooling system is full of coolant. this problem may be caused if lets say the coolant level is low, this can happen if theres a leak in the system. if low fill system and then have it checked for leaks.another problem if the system is not low then you may have a bad thermostat, a bad thermostat will not allow the coolant to flow inturn making engine overheat, the the last common problem could be a bad fan, start in the order i listed as far as the thermostat watch the gauge and feel the lower hose, if the gauge goes to hot and the lowe hose is luke warm or cold and the top radiator hose is hot then the thermostat is bad. the last test is for the fan, if the top hose and the lower hoses are hot and the car is starting to overheat then it may be the fan, see if the fan is spinning, this car may have an electric fan or belt driven fan, if its electric then see if its running, if the fan is not running then testing need to be done to see why, the fuse and the relay will need to be tested and then the fan itself. if the fan is belt driven then you will see if the belt is on the fan pulley and then check the fan clutch, the way the fan clutch works is the fan will run at a slowwer speed than the engine and then when the heat from the radiator gets hot and blows on the front of the clutch this causes the fan clutch to lock up and makes the fan spin faster. check to see if this is happening but if this were to be the problem or if the fan was aproblem the car would not overheat as you are driving rather it would overheat at a stop or in slow traffic because the air flow from the driving would act like a fan as the air flows through the radiator from driving this would cool the engine if it was the fan, but if the car overheats even while moving then it would not be a fan problem but rather the thermostat or low coolant. there is another problem but i would start with these. hope this is helpful.

Oct 02, 2011 | BMW Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How serious is a electronic thermostat needing replaced in a 2001 bmw 325 what and does it do ?


Hello,
Thermostats are more important than ever before.

What the thermostat does;
It seperates your coolant into two parts. The first part is in your engine, the second part is in your
radiator and the coolant reservior. When the coolant in the engine reaches the temperature rating,
on the thermostat, ( 195 to 205 degrees F ), the thermostat opens to allow the two parts of coolant to change places. Now the cooled coolant in the radiator and reservior flows into the engine while the heated coolant flows from the engine into the radiator and reservior to be air cooled by the radiator fan. Engines are at their peak of efficiency at 195 to 205 degrees F.

I hope this helps you.
Donnie

Feb 20, 2011 | 2001 BMW 325

2 Answers

Temp gauge is in normal, 200 degree, range when starting. Within a few minutes of driving goes up to 250, right below orange line. No leaks found, coolant level appears fine. Any ideas?


250 DEGREES ENGINE GETTING TOO HOT.SOUND LIKE CLUTCH FAN FREEWHEEL.IF CLUTCH FAN DONT LOCK IN OR HAVE RESISTANCE TURNING BY HAND WHEN ENGINE HOT.FAN CLUTCH IS BAD.IF FAN CLUTCH OKAY COOLANT LEVEL CORRECT.I WOULD CHANGE THERMOSTAT FLUSH OUT ENGINE AND RADIATOR.IF ENGINE TEMPERATURE STILL READS 250 DEGREES OVER FLOW JUG OR RESERVOIR NOT BOILING OVER THE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR FAULTY.

Nov 05, 2010 | 2003 Chevrolet Avalanche

2 Answers

My 1996 olds. aurora keeps over heating. I can just put coolant in the radiator and seconds after I start the engine, I get a low coolant reading in the information display. In addition, it spits...


Hello,

There are several problems that could be leading to an engine overheating. I will discuss some of them and you can try to act on which solutions that can help.

THERMOSTAT STUCK SHOT The thermostat, which is usually located in a housing where the upper radiator hose connects to the engine, controls the operating temperature of the engine. It does this by blocking the flow of coolant from the engine to the radiator until the engine reaches a certain temperature (usually 190 to 195 degrees F.). When this temperature is reached, the thermostat opens and allows coolant to circulate from the engine to the radiator.
If the thermostat fails to open, which can happen due to mechanical failure or if a steam pocket forms under the thermostat due to incomplete filling of the cooling system or coolant loss, no coolant will circulate between the engine and radiator, and the engine will quickly overheat.
You can check for this condition by carefully touching the upper radiator hose when the engine is first started and is warming up. If the upper radiator hose does not become hot to the touch within several minutes after starting the engine, it means the thermostat is probably defective and needs to be replaced.
CAUTION: The replacement thermostat should always have the same temperature rating as the original. Do not substitute a colder or hotter thermostat on any vehicle that has computerized engine controls as engine operating temperature affects the operation of the fuel, ignition and emissions control systems.


DEFECTIVE FAN CLUTCH
On rear wheel drive vehicles with belt-driven cooling fan, a "fan clutch" is often used to improve fuel economy. The clutch is a viscous-coupling filled with silicone oil. The clutch allows the fan to slip at high speed, which reduces the parasitic horsepower drag on the engine. If the clutch slips too much, however, the fan may not turn fast enough to keep the engine cool.
The silicone fluid inside the clutch breaks down over time and can leak out due to wear, too. If you see oily streaks radiating outward on the clutch (and/or the fan can be spun by hand with little or no resistance when the engine is off), it means the clutch is bad and needs to be replaced. Any play or wobble in the fan due to wear in the clutch also signals the need for a new clutch.


EXTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS

Leaks in radiator or heater hoses, the water pump, radiator, heater core or engine freeze plugs can allow coolant to escape. No engine can tolerate the loss of coolant for very long, so it usually overheats as soon as a leak develops.
A visual inspection of the cooling system and engine will usually reveal where the coolant is going.
Leaks in hoses can only be fixed by replacing the hose. Leaks in the water pump also require replacing the pump. But leaks in a radiator, heater hose or freeze plug may sometimes respond to a sealer added to the cooling system.


WEAK OR LEAKY RADIATOR CAP
If no leaks are apparent, the radiator cap should be pressure tested to make sure it is holding the specified pressure. If the spring inside the cap is weak (or the cap is the wrong one for the application), the engine will lose coolant out the overflow tube every time it gets hot.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAK
If there are no visible coolant leaks, but the engine is using coolant, there may be a crack in the cylinder head or block, or a leaky head gasket that is allowing coolant to escape into the combustion chamber or crankcase.

EXHAUST RESTRICTION
In some instances a severe exhaust restriction can produce enough backpressure to cause an engine to overheat. The most likely cause of the blockage would be a plugged catalytic converter or a crushed or damaged pipe. Checking intake vacuum and/or exhaust backpressure can diagnose this kind of problem.

BAD WATER PUMP
In a high mileage engine, the impeller that pumps the coolant through the engine inside the water pump may be so badly corroded that the blades are loose or eaten away. If such is the case, the pump must be replaced. Most pump failures, however, occur at the pump shaft bearing and seal. After tens of thousands of miles of operation, the bearing and seal wear out. Coolant starts to leak out past the shaft seal, which may cause the engine to overheat due to the loss of coolant. A sealer additive will not stop this kind of leak. Replacing the water pump is the only cure.
CAUTION: A leaky water pump should be replaced without delay, not only to reduce the risk of engine overheating but to prevent catastrophic pump failure. If the shaft breaks on a rear-wheel drive vehicle, the fan may go forward and chew into the radiator ruining the radiator.


INOPERATIVE FAN MOTOR
On most front-wheel drive cars, the fan that cools the radiator is driven by an electric motor. A temperature switch or coolant sensor on the engine cycles the fan on and off as additional cooling is needed. If the temperature switch or coolant sensor (or the relay that routes power to the fan motor is bad), the fan won't come on when it is needed and the engine will overheat. Likewise, if the fan motor itself is bad, the fan won't work.
The system needs to be diagnosed to determine where the problem is so the correct component can be replaced.

Also check if you are not having a blockage in the coolants hose.

Take care and good luck

Oct 26, 2010 | 1996 Oldsmobile Aurora

1 Answer

I have a 2004 BMW 330i and have replaced everything in the coolant system, and my vehicle is still leaking coolant out the expansion tank, or the cap where you add coolant to the radiator. I have use OEM...


We have had some similar problems with some BMW's,the last one we replaced the expansion tank.Before we attached the upper radiator hose to the radiator we filled the engine with antifreeze through the hose.Install the hose and fill your expansion tank to the proper level and run the engine to operating temperature.

Jan 30, 2010 | BMW 330 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

95 bmw 318is is over heating it has a new radiator


Check the fan activate sensor/switch seems to be not functioning well its allowing the fan to operate late.

Oct 25, 2009 | 1997 BMW 318

1 Answer

I have a 95 bmw 325 ic with similar problems


try the coolant pump to test it take the bottom house of the radiator of ( messy coolant leaks a lot ) turn engine on if it just trikles out with no pressure its the coolant pump another sign which worked on my golf, turn your heating on if it does not stay hot or is not very hot then its your pump .right bk to let me now

Aug 11, 2009 | 1989 BMW 3 Series

1 Answer

Car is overheating


2 Inspect Belt Incorrectly routed, adjusted, tensioned, missing, or worn water pump belt(s). grey_line.gif 3 Inspect Oil Pan Gasket - Performance Ruptured, cracked or leaking radiator hose. grey_line.gif 4 Inspect Radiator Cap Worn or damaged radiator cap grey_line.gif 5 Inspect Thermostat Thermostat stuck closed grey_line.gif 6 Inspect Fan Blade Broken, missing, or defective fan blade(s). grey_line.gif 8 Inspect Water Pump Damaged, worn or leaking water pump. grey_line.gif 9 Inspect Intake Manifold Plenum - Perform Leaking water pump gasket. grey_line.gif 10 Inspect Cooling Fan Control Faulty cooling fan control or circuit. grey_line.gif 11 Inspect Cooling Fan Switch - Radiator Faulty radiator cooling fan switch or circuit. grey_line.gif 12 Inspect Engine Temperature Sensor Faulty engine temperature sensor or circuit. grey_line.gif 13 Inspect Temperature Switch Damaged or faulty temperature switch or temperature switch circuit. grey_line.gif 14 Inspect Fan Clutch Worn, loose or faulty fan clutch. grey_line.gif 15 Inspect Ported Vacuum Switch Damaged, leaking, or faulty ported vacuum switch. grey_line.gif 16 Inspect Radiator Obstructed radiator core or radiator cooling fins. grey_line.gif 17 Inspect Head Gasket - Performance Head gasket leaking coolant into cylinders here is a list of things to check Shaun

Nov 17, 2008 | 2000 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Please help


possible coolant blockage in engine. Fan does not run because temp sensor is located is part of coolant that is not getting hot. Describe loud noise please. You are likely facing terminal engine failure, however, try back-flushing coolant passages on engine. This may be tricky, but you could remove thermostat and try running engine, or fabricate a rubber stopper on the end of a garden hose to put in hole where thermostat goes, remove lower radiator hose and flush water as hard as possible. A big rust flake could be blocking coolant flow. PS: have you recently had any work done on cooling system? I have seen some stupids use so much sealant when replacing a water pump that excess blocks coolant flow. Lots of luck. "The rusty one"

May 23, 2008 | 1997 BMW 318

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