Question about 2001 Mitsubishi Montero

3 Answers

RIGHT REAR ENGINE KNOCK AT IDLE 3.5 L

CUSTOMER BROUGHT IN CAR FOR KNOCKING CK ITS NOT STARTER FLYWHEEL AND CONVERTER BOLTS OR CRANK PLAY KINDA UNSURE WHERE TO GO FROM HERE

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  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    sounds kinda tiney

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    the sound is at right rear lower part of motor

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    due u know if there are any vavle train problems as we listen around with a set of ears it seems very isolated by the rear cyl by exhaust manifold compared to sy the front cyl and only on the right side

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    no on the low oil and doesnt sound like piston knock not that deep of a sound on occasion makes no noise when started but comes in after but most of time noise present when started

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    they sent me to you

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    first ck starter because we tought the starter drive wasnt returing all the way and taping on the flywheel noise changes with engine speed ck flywheel and converter bolts all tight and no cracks

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    thank you dennis is going to look something on mitchell on demand be right back with one more question edmonds said to ck with u are some how linked with there site thats how i found u guy be right back

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    its roller rockers running off cam so there are no lifters unless any other ideas may pull right vavle cover off and see if anything is broken only part of this that we cant get by is on some start ups the motors quit example motor making noise changed oil start up ran 10 secs. no noise shut off to ck oil start up noise bet your glad not me lol

  • munskiauto14 Jan 30, 2009

    I wanted to thank you guys for your help my name is sherita and i am trying to help my boss solve this problem I just might be back with more questions thank you both again

  • munskiauto14 Feb 16, 2009

    the problem with the montero was the timing belt tensenior the oil leaked out and causing the belt to flutter and rattle the pulley new

    tensenior took care of problem thanks for all your help

  • Greg Wilkins
    Greg Wilkins May 11, 2010

    have you checked the pulleys on the front of the engine? Or is it on the back of the engine? When you rate a response please rate it by the answer you get not by something someone just blurted out.

  • Greg Wilkins
    Greg Wilkins May 11, 2010

    is it a deep solid knock or like piston slap ?

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Get rid of the vehicle. Had the same problem, couldn´t figure out what it was, Mitsubishi looked at the vehicle and said it is well cared for, return in a few days and we´ll check ... but my wife was driving when ... bang ... something broke right through the lower portion of the engine ... made a hole about two inches wide... and now we need a new engine!

Posted on Jul 26, 2010

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It sounds like a lifter so try using LUCAS it makes the best additive on the market for about anything to do with automotive. The have a oil additive that you can use.

Posted on Jan 30, 2009

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On some of these Imports, If the Fuel Rail has a Problem it will Tick and Knock loudly,Check and let me Know. Please Rate My Response! Thanks!

Posted on Jan 30, 2009

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  • Travis Humphries
    Travis Humphries Jan 30, 2009

    This is Going to Be Internal then. Probably a Piston. Has the Customer Ran it Really hard? Maybe a Quart Low on Oil?

  • Travis Humphries
    Travis Humphries Jan 30, 2009

    Check Edmonds.com for the Service Bulletins and Recalls + Complaints on this Model. That is always where we Start. I have heard of a Few Models with this Problem But, It always seems to be a Different Part when Torn Down. Pretty Tough.

  • Travis Humphries
    Travis Humphries Jan 30, 2009

    Who did?????

  • Travis Humphries
    Travis Humphries Jan 30, 2009

    Been there before and tried the same Check. This is a Trial and Error Repair unless you only do Imports. It is internal Though.

  • Travis Humphries
    Travis Humphries Jan 30, 2009

    No Problem! I will be right here!

  • Travis Humphries
    Travis Humphries Jan 30, 2009

    You know it! LOL That should get it. Let me know if you need more Help! and GOOD LUCK!

  • Travis Humphries
    Travis Humphries Jan 30, 2009

    No Problem! Happy to Help! You can always find me on the Startup Page for Fixya! I am the Top Expert!

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1 Answer

How do I remove my fly wheel?


This is not an easy job and requires a substantial amount of knowledge. you will also need a decent floor jack or a transmission jack. The transmission must be pulled or slid back to get the flywheel off the engine. The first thing is to take the transmission dust cover off or in some cases the starter. The starter needs to come out anyway. This will reveal the torque converter bolts. You can use a pry-bar to turn the flywheel around so you can get to each torque converter bolts. The other option is to turn the crank with a socket and breaker bar from the front of the engine/harmonic balancer. Then you must drop the transmission or if you can slide it back enough to reach the flywheel bolts mounted to the crank. Once you remove the center bolts in the flywheel it should drop out.

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I have a 91 caprice make knocking noise when I crank it


if auto , check the flex plate at the torque converter for cracks
check ring gear for burrs
possible big end bearing
possible piston or broken ring
test by removing a plug and cranking it replace the plug and go to the next plug
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Renault scenic knocking


Well,
There could be a few causes. The rap really could be the bottom end, or number 3 cylinder, or piston slap (when cold), a belt-driven component or cam drive components or even a nerfed valve. The best way to find out is to listen, but I illustrated the Timing Light Trick first if your ears aren't trained (and while you are hooking up that light with the engine running, take the time to listen to it and 'train' your ears to finding out what the heck that noise REALLY could be and what it certainly ISN'T (such as a bubble in the tire thumping the fender, but hey, you are stopped with the car in park while you're hooking up that light, right? (Always work SAFELY).
Here's the breakdown before you declare it's the bottom end:
1) Connect a timing strobe in accordance with the manufacturer instructions to the main secondary coil wire. If you have a coil over plug installation, there may be an adapter you would need to get.
2) In idle, flash the strobe. If the knocking appears to be in time with the timing light, it's the upper half of the engine (cam, tappets, valves, etc.)
3) In idle, flash the strobe. If the knocking appears to be twice that of the strobe, you can conclude it's something in the lower half of the engine. Generally, crank journal main bearings make a worse metallic ringing under load. Connecting rod bearings usually quiet down under load if they're worn as the extra slack is taken up by cylinder pressure.
4) The most accurate test is to use your ears. Listen with a stethoscope all over the engine until you can tell me whether that knock is really a faulty power steering pump bearing, an alternator bearing, the number 3 cylinder or the camshaft. Take the time - you are training your ears to listen to what the engine is telling you.

Of course, if you have gas in the oil, it'll knock. If you did an engine flush, it may knock - all that gunk overloads the filter to the point the bypass opens in the oil pump - you're SOL if that happened. If you're out of oil, it WILL knock. If you changed heads recently and now you have a knock, the most likely cause for that is coolant in the oil; whoever changed the head burped the old one off without draining the coolant from the block. Even a small amount of it running down into the crankcase from that operation will create an acid that will destroy bearing surface material in a very short period of time. Even a complete oil change will not get all the contaminate out of the engine.
Lastly, Stop Leak may turn into Stop Engine - so if you use oil additives like these that can possibly clog the journal oil holes and cause a knock.

Bottom line - do your research, listen to what that mill is telling you, rule out belt driven accessories and oil levels (and condition) and when this knock started. Finally, tell me where that knock is coming from - a belt driven component, number 3 cylinder or the flexplate (auto slush boxes) or the flywheel (gearboxes).

Oct 21, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2002 legacy GT, starter spin the flywheel, but engine not turning.


Sounds like the crankshaft is broke. Not a common problem in today's cars but not unheard of.
There are 4 bolts that hold the flywheel to the crank, so it could be broken bolts or a cracked crankshaft.
Either way, you'll have to pull the engine and trans apart to find out.

Dec 18, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

My exwife had someone replace the tranny in her 1998 Chrysler Sebring. Now it wont turn over, it sounds like it is bounded up as if something is possibly jammed. I was thinking maybe the torque converter...


Probably the starter gear is binding on the flywheel after the reinsatlation. If your turning it over with a wrench then that leads me to the starter.

Mar 23, 2011 | 1998 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

I need to know how to seperate my transmission from my block


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION C6
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. From in the engine compartment, remove the two upper converter housing-to-engine bolts.
  3. Disconnect the neutral switch wire at the in-line connector.
  4. Remove the bolt securing the fluid filler tube to the engine cylinder head.
  5. Raise and support the truck on jackstands.
  6. Place the drain pan under the transmission fluid pan. Starting at the rear of the pan and working toward the front, loosen the attaching bolts and allow the fluid to drain. Finally remove all of the pan attaching bolts except two at the front, to allow the fluid to further drain. With fluid drained, install two bolts on the rear side of the pan to temporarily hold it in place.
  7. Remove the converter drain plug access cover from the lower end of the converter housing.
  8. Remove the converter-to-flywheel attaching nuts. Place a wrench on the crankshaft pulley attaching bolt to turn the converter to gain access to the nuts.
  9. With the wrench on the crankshaft pulley attaching bolt, turn the converter to gain access to the converter drain plug. Place a drain pan under the converter to catch the fluid and remove the plug. After the fluid has been drained, reinstall the plug.
  10. On 2WD drive models, disconnect the driveshaft from the rear axle and slide shaft rearward from the transmission. Install a seal installation tool in the extension housing to prevent fluid leakage.
  11. Disconnect the speedometer cable from the extension housing.
  12. Disconnect the downshift and manual linkage rods from the levers at the transmission.
  13. Disconnect the oil cooler lines from the transmission.
  14. Remove the vacuum hose from the vacuum diaphragm unit. Remove the vacuum line retaining clip.
  15. Disconnect the cable from the terminal on the starter motor. Remove the three attaching bolts and remove the starter motor.
  16. On 4WD drive models remove the transfer case.
  17. Remove the two engine rear support and insulator assembly-to-attaching bolts.
  18. Remove the two engine rear support and insulator assembly-to-extension housing attaching bolts.
  19. Remove the six bolts securing the No. 2 crossmember to the frame side rails.
  20. Raise the transmission with a transmission jack and remove both crossmembers.
  21. Secure the transmission to the jack with the safety chain.
  22. Remove the remaining converter housing-to-engine attaching bolts.
  23. Move the transmission away from the engine. Lower the jack and remove the converter and transmission assembly from under the vehicle. To install:
  24. Tighten the converter drain plug.
  25. Position the converter on the transmission making sure the converter drive flats are fully engaged in the pump gear.
  26. With the converter properly installed, place the transmission on the jack. Secure the transmission on the jack with the chain.
  27. Rotate the converter until the studs and drain plug are in alignment with their holes in the flywheel.
  28. Move the converter and transmission assembly forward into position, using care not to damage the flywheel and the converter pilot. The converter must rest squarely against the flywheel. This indicates that the converter pilot is not binding in the engine crankshaft.
  29. Install the converter housing-to-engine attaching bolts and tighten them to 65 ft. lbs. (88 Nm) for the diesel; 50 ft. lbs. (68 Nm) for gasoline engines.
  30. Remove the transmission jack safety chain from around the transmission.
  31. Position the No. 2 crossmember to the frame side rails. Install and tighten the attaching bolts.
  32. Install transfer case on 4WD drive models.
  33. Position the engine rear support and insulator assembly above the crossmember. Install the rear support and insulator assembly-to-extension housing mounting bolts and tighten the bolts to 45 ft. lbs. (61 Nm).
  34. Lower the transmission and remove the jack.
  35. Secure the engine rear support and insulator assembly to the crossmember with the attaching bolts and tighten them to 80 ft. lbs. (108 Nm).
  36. The balance of installation is the reverse of removal.
AOD
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Raise the vehicle on hoist or stands.
  3. Place the drain pan under the transmission fluid pan. Starting at the rear of the pan and working toward the front, loosen the attaching bolts and allow the fluid to drain. Finally remove all of the pan attaching bolts except two at the front, to allow the fluid to further drain. With fluid drained, install two bolts on the rear side of the pan to temporarily hold it in place.
  4. Remove the converter drain plug access cover from the lower end of the converter.
  5. Remove the converter-to-flywheel attaching nuts. Place a wrench on the crankshaft pulley attaching bolt to turn the converter to gain access to the nuts.
  6. Place a drain pan under the converter to catch the fluid. With the wrench on the crankshaft pulley attaching bolt, turn the converter to gain access to the converter drain plug and remove the plug. After the fluid has been drained, reinstall the plug.
  7. On 2WD drive models, matchmark and disconnect the driveshaft from the rear axle and slide shaft rearward from the transmission. Install a seal installation tool in the extension housing to prevent fluid leakage.
  8. Disconnect the cable from the terminal on the starter motor. Remove the three attaching bolts and remove the starter motor. Disconnect the neutral start switch wires at the plug connector.
  9. Remove the rear mount-to-crossmember attaching bolts and the two crossmember-to-frame attaching bolts.
  10. Remove the two engine rear support-to-extension housing attaching bolts.
  11. Disconnect the TV linkage rod from the transmission TV lever. Disconnect the manual rod from the transmission manual lever at the transmission.
  12. Remove the two bolts securing the bell crank bracket to the converter housing.
  13. On 4WD drive models, remove the transfer case.
  14. Raise the transmission with a transmission jack to provide clearance to remove the crossmember. Remove the rear mount from the crossmember and remove the crossmember from the side supports.
  15. Lower the transmission to gain access to the oil cooler lines.
  16. Disconnect each oil line from the fittings on the transmission.
  17. Disconnect the speedometer cable from the extension housing.
  18. Remove the bolt that secures the transmission fluid filler tube to the cylinder block. Lift the filler tube and the dipstick from the transmission.
  19. Secure the transmission to the jack with the chain.
  20. Remove the converter housing-to-cylinder block attaching bolts.
  21. Carefully move the transmission and converter assembly away from the engine and, at the same time, lower the jack to clear the underside of the vehicle.
  22. Remove the converter and mount the transmission in a holding fixture.
  23. Tighten the converter drain plug. To install:
  24. Position the converter on the transmission, making sure the converter drive flats are fully engaged in the pump gear by rotating the converter.
  25. With the converter properly installed, place the transmission on the jack. Secure the transmission to the jack with a chain.
  26. Rotate the converter until the studs and drain plug are in alignment with the holes in the flywheel.
  27. Move the converter and transmission assembly forward into position, using care not to damage the flywheel and the converter pilot. The converter must rest squarely against the flywheel. This indicates that the converter pilot is not binding in the engine crankshaft.
  28. Install and tighten the converter housing-to-engine attaching bolts to 40-50 ft. lbs. (54-68 Nm).
  29. The balance of installation is the reverse of removal.
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Nov 03, 2010 | 1991 Ford F150

1 Answer

Starter runs but won't engage flywheel


engine crank thrusts worn and crank moved back enough to not engage ,with a manual the clutch would push it forewards.or the flex plate on the back of the torque converter damaged and broke in teh centre where bolts to the crank

Dec 01, 2008 | 1996 Lincoln Town Car

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