Question about 1997 Ford Mustang Cobra

1 Answer

Rear Brakes not loosening up on Mustang

I turned the discs and replaced the brake pads on my 1997 Mustang. When driving, after releasing the brake pedal the rear brakes on both sides do not loosening up completely; causing them to heat up.

I thought maybe I had a bad caliper, but they didn't have a problem before installing the pads and it's hard to beleive both would go bad at the same time.

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  • spacedove Jan 29, 2009

    Thanks for responding.
    I just checked and there are no twisted or kinked brake fluid lines. There mostly metal except the last foot going into the caliper. I also disconnected the emergency brake but to no avail. By the way, the front brakes work fine.

  • spacedove Jan 30, 2009

    Yes, I turned in the pistons and even disconnected the parking brakes. After researching another site, I think I found the problem. It looks like the slide pins are seized due to water getting under the boot and rusting them.

  • mike loshbough
    mike loshbough May 11, 2010

    maybe the brake hoses are twisted when you took off calipers please check this.

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  • Master
  • 424 Answers

Did you turn the pistons in to allow room for new pads. The calipers are also for your parking brake and need to be turns in when replacing pads.

Posted on Jan 30, 2009

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2 Answers

1994 dodge 2500 diesel. Put remanfactored calipers and new hoses on the front of this truck. Now I have a soft pedal that if held fades to the floor. Thought the master cyl must have a leak in it. Replaced...


Hi,
sound as if you really do have a problem!
From your description I presume that you are confident in doing your own work?
The quickest way to check your system is to use brake hose clamps to isolate each section of the braking system. I would suggest that you rent or buy a set of the clamps.

Put the truck on axle stands and make sure it's safely secured. ]
If possible have an assistant to sit in the cab and depress the brake pedal on your instructions.
Place a brake hose clamp on both front brake hoses and the rear axle hose.
Depress the brake pedal firmly.
The pedal should have minimum movement, and be rock-solid and you should not be able to depress it further.
If the pedal does go down when you apply it, the likely reason is that the Brake Master Cyl is by-passing internally, ie, only one section is active.

You stated that the M/C had been replaced. so we shall presume that the brake pedal is rock hard.
Go to the rear brake hose clamp and release it. Instruct your assistant to depress the brake pedal. If the brake pedal moves a significant distance, then (a) your rear brake shoes require adjustment (b) rhere is a leaking brake cyl, (check for brake fluid in the drum) or (c) you have a "lazy' or a piston (s) which have siezed during a brake actuation. That problem will require removing the rear brake drums for further inspection. Not the problem? Then adjust the rear brakes if required, then depress the brake pedal again. The downward travel should now be noticeably reduced.

If all is well at the rear brakes. refit the brake hose clamp. Go to the passengers side front brake and have your assistant apply the footbrake. Pedal rockhard/minimun movement? Release the brake hose clamp whilst your assist has pressure on the pedal. spin the front wheel by hand, and note if (a) the brake pedal has excessive downward travel. (b) the brake pads are contacting the brake disc, (the wheel will cease rotating and you will hear the pads contact the disc.)

Pedal displays limited downward travel and pads contact disc? Refit the brake hose clamp and go to drivers side brake and follow the same procedure. If the pedal has excessive downward travel then you have found your inital problem.

If releasing both front brake hose clamps results in excessive brake pedal travel, then the problem will be easier to address if you deal with one side first, complete the resolution, test by using the brake hose clamps, then start / complete the other faulty brake.

Whichever side you start to work on, be methodical, boring as it sounds.
remove the road wheel, but before doing so, place a hand on the top and bottom of the tyre and rock the wheel away from you and check the bearing play. If memory serves me correctly, that year Dodge has the discs in one piece with the hub.

You have removed the wheel. Now, have your assistant turn the steering onto full right lock. Before continuing, I would like to remind you that the vehicle is up on axle stands and you have secured it safely, in order to conform with accepted safety parameters, correct?

The steering is now on full right lock and you can see both disc pads. Now, very carefully check the position of the caliper in relation to the disc pads. Is there and equal spacing on each side? Now, have your assistant release the brake pedal and very carefully observe the travel of the disc pad pistons. They should retract and the hub should turn freely by hand. A very light drag is allowed between disc pad and disc, but it should NOT be discernible when you rotate the hub by hand.

With no pressure on the brake pedal, and using an appropriate tool, attempt to have the caliper pistons retract into their cylinders / bores. Completed? Use caution as it is very easy to break / damage a disc by using undue force when retracting the pistons.

There is now an obvious gap between disc pads and disc (or rotor..sorry) Now, carefully check that the pad guide pins are not deformed and that the pads ride easily on them. if a pad jams when the brakes are applied, then, when the piston retracts, when force is removed from the brake pedal. There is an appreciable gap to close, upon the next application of the brakes!

Some types of disc pad retaining /guide pins are a tight fit, and it is very easy to tilt a pad when fitting the pins, causing the disc pad to fail to retract fully, and again, displayed by a brake pedal with excessive travel.

When the brake pedal is applied, the brake fluid has to fill the caliper piston bores, then exert pressure on the piston to force it against the disc pads, and they in turn are forced into contact with the disc. If the piston has to move an appreciable distance before contacting the disc pad, that takes more brake fluid to fill the bore of the piston, and the master cylinder piston has to travel further,resulting in a brake pedal that displays excessive travel .

I notice that you did not mention the type of effort or number of applications of the brake pedal which resulted in a firm pedal.

If you fitted replacement calipers, can I presume that you fitted new guide pins to the calipers?
Last but not least, (a) are they the correct calipers for the vehicle as regards piston bore size? The brake Master cyl will not be able to fill the bores of the calipers with enough fluid to drive the pistons out to apply the disc pads, if the bores are oversized. The pedal will also display excessive travel.
(b) If the brake master cyl is overfilled, when the brakes are applied, the master cyl will force fluid to the calipers, expand the caliper pistons, but will be unable to release the application to the pistons due to the fluid being unable to return to the master cyl as the allotted reservoir space has been filled with static fluid. When the brake pedal is depressed again, the Master cyl cannot service the caliper pistons on the first stroke as the pistons are locked at full stroke / travel in the bores, resulting in the brake pedal going to the floor, or giving that impression.
HOWEVER, that condition, if the vehicle is driven any distance, will result in the obvious odor of overheated disc brake pads, and the vehicle struggling to display any state of acceleration.
(c) Are they in fact the correct disc brake pads? It would be wise to remove a guide / retainer pin and check for free movement of the pad on the remaining pin. All ok, then refit the pin which you removed and test again. The pads have to be free to move on the pins, and thus align themselves with the face of the disc / rotor when the brakes are applied. Some people coat the pins with never-seeze or hi-temp grease when fitting them, others prefer them to be dry.

In closing, I would recommend that you check the full travel AND RETRACTION of the caliper pistons in their respective bores. It is not unknown for re-built / new parts to be defective.

It would be interesting to hear if any of the above proved to be beneficial in resolving your problem.

Jan 27, 2011 | 1994 Dodge Ram

1 Answer

What tools needed to replace front brake pads & rotors


Brake Pads
Removal & Installation
Front





3.4L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_34_frontbrakeassembly.gif








4.0L and 4.7L front disc brake assembly
toy_4run_frontbrakeassembly.gif



To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Clip, 2 caliper pins, the anti-rattle spring then remove the 2 brake pads
      and the 4 anti-squeal shims

To Install:

CAUTION
Only replace brake pads on 1 side of the
vehicle at a time. Failure to use this procedure could cause the caliper pistons
on the opposite side of the vehicle to pop out requiring the reconditioning or
replacement of the brake caliper.


  1. Remove a small amount of brake fluid from the master cylinder.
  2. Install a used brake pad into the caliper and compress the caliper pistons.
  3. Apply disc brake grease to both sides of the inner anti-squeal shims.
  4. Install or connect the following:

    • Anti-squeal shims to the new brake pads
      NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced
      together with the pads.

    • 2 brake pads
    • Anti-rattle spring and the 2 caliper pins
    • Clip
    • Front wheel

  5. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  6. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.

Rear
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Rear wheel






      toy_4run_rearcalbolts.gif



    • 2 cylinder slide pins from rear caliper assembly
    • Caliper assembly from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 brake pads with anti-squeal shims from rear caliper mounting
    • 2 anti-squeal shims from each disc brake pads
    • Pad wear indicator plate from the inner side disc brake pad
    • 4 pad support plates from the rear caliper mounting

To Install:


  1. Install or connect the following:

    • 4 pad support plates on the rear caliper mounting
    • Pad wear indicator plate on the inside brake pad
      Note: Install the pad wear indicator facing downward.

    • Anti-squeal shims on each brake pad
    • 2 disc brake pads with anti-squeal shims to the caliper assembly

  2. Apply lithium soap base glycol grease to the sliding part of 2 caliper slide
    pins.
  3. Install or connect the following:

    • Disc brake caliper assembly with 2 caliper slide pins
    • Torque to 65 ft-lbs (88 Nm)
    • Rear wheel

  4. Depress the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  5. Check the brake fluid level and top off as needed.
--- Removal & Installation
Front
To Remove:


  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of
    this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    • Front wheel
    • Front brake caliper assembly

  3. Make matchmarks on the disc and the axle hub.
  4. Remove the front disc.

To Install:


  1. Align matchmarks and disc onto axle hub.
  2. Install or connect the following:

    • Front brake caliper assembly with the 2 bolts

      1. Torque to 90 ft-lbs (123 Nm)

    • Front wheel

Sep 23, 2010 | 2003 Toyota 4Runner

3 Answers

2007 camry brakes vibrating


Installing new brake pads on toyota camry solara 2006 front rotors and pads and rear pads. Steering wheel would shake while breaking on 50+ miles per hour speeds. All fixed now.

Jun 22, 2010 | 2007 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

1 Answer

Info on do it tyour self clutch removal on 2001 mustang 3.8


REMOVAL:
  1. Lift clutch pedal to uppermost position to disengage clutch and brake pedal pivot shaft.
  2. Push clutch and brake pedal pivot shaft forward and unhook clutch release lever cable from clutch and brake pedal pivot shaft and allow it to slowly swing rearward.
  3. Raise and support vehicle.
  4. Remove clutch release lever dust shield.
  5. Disconnect clutch release lever cable from clutch release shaft.
  6. Remove retaining clip, then clutch release lever cable from flywheel housing.
  7. Remove starter motor from flywheel housing, then engine rear plate to front lower flywheel housing bolts.
  8. Remove transmission.
  9. Remove flywheel housing back just far enough to clear clutch pressure plate, then remove housing.
  10. Remove clutch release shaft from flywheel housing by pulling it through window in flywheel housing until retainer spring disengages from pivot.
  11. Remove clutch release hub and bearing from clutch release shaft.
  12. Loosen six clutch pressure plate bolts evenly to release spring tension gradually and avoid distorting clutch pressure plate. If same clutch pressure plate is to be installed, mark plate and flywheel so pressure plate can be installed in its original position.
  13. Remove clutch pressure plate and clutch disc from flywheel.
INSTALLATION:
  1. Position clutch disc and pressure plate assembly on flywheel, noting following:
    1. Three flywheel housing to block dowels on flywheel must be properly aligned with clutch pressure plate.
    2. Bent, damaged or missing flywheel housing to block dowels must be replaced.
    3. tart clutch pressure plate bolts but do not tighten.
    4. Avoid touching clutch disc face, dropping parts or contaminating parts with oil or grease.
    5. Align clutch disc using suitable alignment tool inserted in pilot bearing.
    6. To avoid clutch pressure plate distortion, alternately tighten bolts a few turns at a time, until they are all tight, then tighten to specifications.

  2. Install transmission to flywheel housing.
  3. Install engine rear plate to flywheel front lower housing bolts, then connect clutch release cable to flywheel housing and connect retaining clip.
  4. Connect clutch release lever cable to clutch release shaft, then install clutch release lever dust shield.
  5. Install starter motor.
  6. Lower vehicle, then install clutch release lever cable as follows:
    1. Lift clutch pedal to disengage clutch and brake pedal pivot shaft.
    2. Push clutch and brake pedal pivot shaft forward and hook end of clutch release lever cable over rear of clutch and brake pedal pivot shaft.

  7. Cycle clutch pedal several times to adjust clutch release lever cable

Aug 08, 2009 | 2001 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Mustang parking brake won't release tension on rear brakes


since the new pads are alot thicker than the old ones,the brake needs to be set properly.
something is not right for sure.
the retainer for the park brake cable may be not in the right spot.there is two places it can fit.

May 23, 2009 | 1998 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

2002 tahoe breaks lock up during driving


It sounds like the rear calipers are bad. Raise the rear wheels and see if you can turn the tires. If you can't, open the bleeder. If you still can't replace the caliper. If you can turn the wheel after you open the bleeder, replace the brake hose to that wheel.

Apr 12, 2009 | 2000 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

Rear Drivers side brake(possibly E-brake) locking while driving


if you have disc brakes you may just have worn out the pads, the squeaking would be the "squealer", the locking up could be the caliper piston being forced out by the brake booster (when shifting), which would make sense if it's a disc system. If that be the case, a new brake pad would be the solution, assuming you haven't worn the rotor out already.

Mar 23, 2009 | 1999 Ford Mustang Cobra

2 Answers

Rear disc brakes drag after installing new pads


Just did my rear brakes this weekend, Monday had a very slight drag. Noted that when I installed new pads I had to tap them on. That shouldn't be. When brakes are released, there should be enough play to allow the pads to back off the disc. Tonight, I removed the pads and filed down the ends of the tips that go into the top and bottom channels until I could install and remove them with fingertips, that gives them enough play to grab and release. Drag disappeared; the old girl ran like she should.

Jan 18, 2009 | 2000 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

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