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Need 2 trans coolers?

165k miles never changed fluid yet,want to change fluid and filter ,add another cooler and inline filter,good idea?

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 3,904 Answers

It is not really needed to add to the existing but isn't going to hurt a thing. Changing the fluid should be done every 60,000 miles or per your manuals guidelines.

Posted on Jan 24, 2013

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emissionwiz
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SOURCE: 99 GMC K 1500 Transmission burning fluid and comeing out blow-by

The fluid boiling over is caused by the slippage heating up the fluid, your clutch pack is worn out, you will need an overhaul.

Posted on Nov 07, 2008

  • 11 Answers

SOURCE: fluid change schedule

They say those should be changed every 20 000km. Hope this helps.

Posted on Apr 06, 2009

  • 136 Answers

SOURCE: 98 Volvo S70 -It's that time to change the ATF

No the volvo does not have a servicable filter, The best thing to do is to flush new fluid through the transmission periodically, replacing all of the fluid.

Posted on Apr 28, 2009

  • 17 Answers

SOURCE: 2002 cougar transmission filter

A CD4E transaxle has a internal filter and can only be changed by taking transmission apart.

Posted on Jul 20, 2009

lscf150
  • 443 Answers

SOURCE: Changing transmission fluid for 06 Kia Sedona

Transmissions these days need very little maintenance, our fluids are advanced formulas that hold up for an average of 100,000 miles, most vehicle manufactures recommend no maintenance for automatic transaxles these days.As for a transmission flush I don't recommend this because it's an expense that is not needed and possibly could loosen some contaminants setting them loose to possibly clog some of the very small passages in the transaxle requiring full transaxle service,which could include removal,dissassembly,etc of your trans.Now draining and replacing fluid is OK if that makes you feel a peace of mind but normally not needed,if you decide to do that,as far as quantity just note approx. how much fluid is drained and purchase similar amount in quarts and then refill (DO NOT OVERFILL)
start engine, let it warm up to operating temp,then check the transmission dipstick for the correct level,remember the vehicle needs to be on a level surface,hot idiling in park when you check the fluid level. Good luck !

Posted on Nov 26, 2009

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Transmission fluid


You change transmission fluid every 3 years

While 90k is only 54,000 miles, ten years is how
old my lincoln is & I changed mine 3 times & it should
have been 4 times

You go by years, not miles anymore

Time used is heat cycles & the fluid will only last
for 3 years including 2 hot summers ,then it won't
remove heat & you trans clutches fail

You have to use the NEW Matic S from a nissan dealer,
as no other fluid is correct for your jatco trans at this point
in time

You add one ten oz bottle of red Lubegard to ALL your vehicles
transmissions with every change

You DO NOT FLUSH a trans as the fine debrib could get
into the solenoids

You have to add a return line filter at the cooler in front of the radiator, because your trans has NO Filter, only a screen bolted to the valve body

Same trans as my 3 week old 2014 Frontier

What you read was IF it was slipping & you change the fluid
it will slip worse,in that case the damage was done already

Ten years is a death sentence to any trans
Change it anyway,not many miles on it

Don't change it if you got shifting problems you don't want
to discuss here & that is why your here

You remove the pan on the bottom of the trans
Wipe it out,clean the magnet & you should have a
fill tube & stick next to the motor to add the MATIC S
Fluid

The return line filter will be your ONLY protection for that
Nissan trans, as a screen is not going to stop anything micro
scopic particles ,nor will a regular filter on most transmissions

You get a Filtran Magnetic Return Line Filter & install
that on the line that goes from the surface to air cooler to the
trans case

The other line you can see goes to the radiator first, then to the
out front cooler,that is the hot oil pressure feed,your putting
you little round filter in the other return line

You can put one of them on the power steering also or change
a steering rack when it fails
Have to do that or new racks are not warranteed

Mar 25, 2014 | 2004 Infiniti G35 Sport Coupe

Tip

How to change my automatice transmission fluid most vehicles.


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Dodge Caravan Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to change my automatic transmission fluid most vehicles


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Cadillac DeVille Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How do you replace the transmission cooler on my 89 oldsmobile cutlass supream


Your trans cooler is located inside one of the radiator tanks and would be expensive to replace.
You can either replace the radiator with new or used or cut the lines and install an external cooler as is used for towing. If the cooler in the radiator is leaking, you need to flush the system to remove as much oil as possible or it will cause hoses to soften and fail. Also wise to change trans fluid as well.
Always use double clamps when running rubber lines for cooler so they don't slide apart under pressure.

Feb 14, 2011 | 1989 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

1 Answer

Hello, i have a 1997 pontiac bonneville with 107000 miles. I would like to change the AT Fluid My Garage wants to do a Flush via the Oil cooler line and replace the Fluid. Is there a Filter in the Trans...


If the Trans is original, it is about ready for a rebuild

If you never changed the fluid every 30,000 miles,
since new, on all your vehicles,point made

Power Steering also-ever wonder why steering
racks fail,neglect,just like transmissions

Just remove the pan,change the filter,put
pan back,add fluid,done

No flushing,won't even go there

I used to own a trans shop,enough said

Feb 09, 2011 | 1997 Pontiac Bonneville

Tip

How to change my automatic Transmission Fluid, most vehicles


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to change your Automatic Transmission fluid, most cars


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Chevrolet 1500 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

99 suburban when hot shifts hard ,let it cool down 5 min. shifts fine .


try installing a aftermarket trans cooler your might be getting pluged

Aug 29, 2009 | 1999 GMC Suburban

1 Answer

1990 Honda Accord EX Transmission


possibly due to low trans fluid pressure. the cooler in the radiator may be plugged. to check, disconnect and bypass cooler with rubber line & clamps. drive 2-3 miles. shifting OK now? install auxillary cooler to bypass one in radiator. you can get one at auto-zone $30-$50. may just need fluid & filter change, but more likely it's the cooler. when they get plugged, either one, pressure drops alot.

Jun 25, 2008 | 1990 Honda Accord

Tip

How to change my automatic transmission fluid


A basic rule of thumb for changing the trans fluid is two fold. Time and condition. As a lubricant it should be changed about every 2 years or about 30-36,000 miles. However, if your trans has a dipstick, you can check the condition of the fluid and determine if you have more or less time. The fluid should be red and clean. If it is black, sorry too late, if it is brown or brownish red, change it. If it is bright red, it is still good.

There are two methods of changing transmission fluid.

The first is to remove the pan and dump all fluid in the pan out, replace the filter and pan gasket and put it all back together and refill trans
There is a problem with this method. While a new filter may seem nice, it is not necessary unless the vehicle is quite old. The filter is there to keep very tiny wear particles from the transmission's internal components from reaching the valve body and causing a valve to hang up. If there is so much material in the pan that it blocks the filter, it is too late to change the fluid, you need an overhaul. Also when you use this method you only change about 50% of the fluid. There is fluid in the torque converter, cooling system and throughout the trans that is not changed.

The second method that I personally recommend for those who want to maintain your trans, (More less you are doing it because it is good maintenance and not because you suspect you have a problem) is a flush method. This process does take a little mechanical aptitude, but can be used on all types of automatic transmission.

First you find a cooler line coming from the trans to your radiator. either one is ok, pick the one that is easiest to get to. For those of you who want to do it the best way, look up and find which line is returning from the cooler back to the trans and unhook that one. Once you know what size the cooler line is, most are either 5/16th or 3/8's. You can pick up a short brake line at a parts store that will screw into the line hole in the radiator. At the same time that you get the brake line, buy a foot of fuel line that fits over the end of the brake line, You may need to bend the line to get it to fit, If you do not have a bender, just bend it a little at a time, just don't let it crimp closed. Screw the brake line and and attach a piece of hose to both lines so that you can catch the fluid as it comes out. Depending on the type of trans you will need between 8 to 15 quarts of fluid and a long neck funnel.

Once you have this all together, put the funnel in the dip stick tube, or remove the radiator type cap on the trans, and be ready to put in fluid. Start the car with the e brake on and in neutral. (if your car has an e-brake release out of part, do it in park, it is not a major difference.) As your fluid is being pumped out of the cooler line in to a catcher, slowly add fluid back into the trans. try to equal the amount to what is being pumped out. When you start seen fresh red fluid again. stop putting fluid in for approximately a quart worth of oil coming out and then shut the car off. reattach the cooler line into the radiator, start the car and check your fluid level. If you need to add fluid until it reaches the full mark, hot and running.

You just changed all your fluid.

Note, certain trans do not have a dip stick and while this procedure will work, you have to know where the plug is that comes off to check fluid level. Some of these models are GM mid size like Malibu, Mazda, Ford Explorers, BMW/s. These and I am sure others have a pipe plug that when you find it while the vehicle is running you fill the trans until you see fluid running out of the plug.

After all this, you understand why a shop will charge 100+120 to perform the service with a flush machine that cost them $5,000. But if you like working on your car, you can do it yourself and save about 60 bucks.

Submitted by Rich (autotherapist) with 28 years of transmission rebuilding and shop ownership in the transmissions field.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Buick LeSabre Cars & Trucks

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