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Rplaced crank sensor and sensors with kit from nissan. crank sensor has white dot. and light came back on and codep0335.

Thinking of replacing battery with new one and check wiring. from crank sensor

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 22,095 Answers

P0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor -Circuit Malfunction
Sorry but i think this fault is caused by a build up of residual magnatism in the crankshaft if a later model where the sensor is picking up from the crankshaft through the cylinder block type fitting ,what i do in cases like this is to try reversing the wires on the sensor it might just work although not always depending on make and type of ignition system .On some opel models i refit with parts from a scrapyard the earlier type of sensor which was on the front pulley as this clears the fault .Failing which ask at the dealers for help and what they recomend as a dealer mechanic will only work on their models and know them inside out unlike this aging old fleet truck mechanic .Who know very little about the modern advanced electronics used on modern vehicles with encyrption chips built into the cars computers to stop people like me from playing with them

Posted on Jan 23, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

emissionwiz
  • 74945 Answers

SOURCE: Check Engine Light 1996 Nissan Maxima

The best way is to use a scan tool to clear the codes, that will turn off the light, also disconnecting the battery over night may work, but no completely sure about that, it varies from year to year.

Posted on Sep 23, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 000 NISSAN Xterra -- after warming up, loses RPM by 500-1000..... have replaced ignition wires and distributor, checked mass air flow sensor and OK.....

I had a problem on my Nissan Xterra 2000. Symptons sound similar. In my case, it ran fine for a while and then suddenly the engine starts to stumble and lose output. At one point it did not even have enough HP to move. Irregular idling too. Thought it was water in my fuel. Bought water remover from the store and added to gas tank. Problem did not go away. Instead, "Service Engine Soon" light came on. Had to have it towed to the dealer as there was no way the engine could keep up with traffic. Dealer replaced the "Crank Position Sensor" today. Parts $33.00, Labor: $300 (about 3 hrs worth of work). Seems to work fine now but I will wait and see. Dealer also stated that Distributor bearing appears to be noisy and will need to be replaced sooner or later. I will wait for it to go before I fix that.

Posted on May 27, 2009

c17hydro
  • 2984 Answers

SOURCE: high idle stalls at lights code for crank sensor

Crankshaft and Camshaft Position Sensors Camshaft Position Sensor Engine timing is determined from the relationship between the crankshaft and camshaft. This relationship is maintained by a timing chain or timing belt. The Engine Management System does not control engine timing but it does monitor the relative position and speed of these shafts by monitoring signals generated by sensors. The Engine Management System (EMS) uses signals generated by the camshaft position sensor to synchronize fuel injection to the valve sequence and for the on-board diagnostic procedure for misfire detection. The EMS energizes the injector at or near the time the intake valve opens. For misfire diagnosis, the EMS compares the number of camshaft sensor reference pulses and the number of crankshaft position sensor reference pulses received. If the EMS receives an incorrect number of pulses Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC’s) should be stored in the EMS.
If the camshaft position sensor or circuit is faulty most engines will start. Some engine management systems will then default to a pre-programmed injector firing sequence. All injectors may be energized simultaneously or all of the injectors on one bank may be energized at the same time. If the CMP data is required for misfire detection and reliable CMP data is not present misfire detection would probably be suspended.
Related Symptoms The following symptoms can be caused by an intermittent wiring connection or faulty signal to the EMS:

  • Extended crank time with a cold engine
  • Intermittent rough running
  • Unstable idle
  • Bucking
  • Hesitation
  • Stumble
  • Chuggle
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Stalling on acceleration
Crankshaft Position Sensor Engine speed is a very important input to the Engine Management System (EMS). Crankshaft speed and position are the basis for many calculations made by the computer. Crankshaft position values are transmitted to the computer by pickup coils also known as Permanent Magnet (P/M) generators, hall-effect sensors or optical sensors. The Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP) also known as engine speed sensor is located in close proximity to the crankshaft.
In addition the EMS uses minute variations in the CKP sensor data to determine engine misfire. The EMS uses this information in conjunction with the camshaft position sensor to perform misfire diagnostics.
Related Symptoms: No Start/Intermittent Start Condition – Can be caused by a faulty crankshaft position sensor due to loose connections, bad grounds, high resistance in the circuit, or opens in the circuit

Posted on Jun 23, 2009

  • 973 Answers

SOURCE: check engine light on, replaced oxygen sensor before catalyst,

  • Water or corrosion in the connector
  • Loose terminals in the connector
  • Wiring burnt on exhaust components
  • Open or short in the wiring due to rubbing on engine components
  • Holes in exhaust allowing unmetered oxygen into exhaust system
  • Unmetered vacuum leak at the engine
  • Bad o2 sensor
  • Bad PCM

Posted on Jun 18, 2010

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No start. replaced cam and crank sensors with nissan parts and still no rpm signal. i have twelve volts on red and green wire a good ground on the black wire and the white wire checked out to be good. the...


hmm are you getting any codes???? I would recheck & see if the connector on the crank sensor didnt come unplugged.... they can be tricky think you have it plugged in good & it comes loose

Sep 15, 2010 | 2003 Nissan Altima

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02' Nissan Altima, car jerking, turns off at light, but turns right back on. Engine light on, code from autozone P0335 crankshaft position sensor. P0725 Engine speed signal circuit. The start up, days it...


If it has a code for loosing the crankshaft position sensor signal, I would certainly start looking at that before venturing into the fuel system. Cam and Crank sensors are a common failure item for Nissans of that era. Nissan actually redesigned the sensor and i think they performed a recall on some vehicles. They are fairly inexpensive and easy to replace. I believe they run about $40 each. Because most people don't have access to a powerful scanner or a digital storage oscilloscope to verify the failure I recommend replacing the cam and crank sensors at the same time.

Sep 02, 2010 | 2002 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

My check engine light is on and I've been told it is the cam sensor, but I can't find one. It's a 2005 nissan altima. Do they have a cam sensor and a crank sensor?


This engine has both. Nissan recommends replacing them at the same time, I think your local Nissan dealer will tell you the same thing.The cam and crank sensors are in the rear of the engine.Looking from the drivers fender find the right rear corner of the valve cover and look straight down the back of the head. the cam sensor is 3-4 inches down from the valve cover gasket surface.the crank sensor is basically straight down from the cam sensor but much harder to see. it is just above the oil pan gasket surface...

Mar 29, 2010 | 2005 Nissan Altima

2 Answers

Crankshaft Position Sensor Error P0335 recurred after r&r


In the kit there are two sensor that look identical. The one for the crankshaft has a white paint mark on it near the bolt hole. Make sure that it is in the right location.

Jul 25, 2009 | 2003 Nissan Altima

2 Answers

RPM turns with no speed. Especially when i hit brake.


Possible timing chain slack? or coverter restriction.

Jun 08, 2009 | 2003 Nissan Altima

2 Answers

I have a 2003 nissan altima 2.5S and it just died on me. Its been cutting off frequently and not wanting to start back up, I think its not getting fuel but Im not sure..I tried getting a jump but that...


It won't get fuel if the crank angle sensor goes out, because that's what triggers the fuel pump, once the ECM gets an input from this sensor it starts the fuel pump which will then allow the car to start. I know a crank angle sensor will kill one of these cars, I think think cam position sensor will just make one run like **** but I could be wrong. One of these sensors is sensors are your problem I'm leaning towards the crank angle sensor though.

May 09, 2009 | 2003 Nissan Altima

5 Answers

2004 Nissan altima 2.5 liter Crankshaft Position Sensor


Yes, the sensor can be replaced in your garage (if you have some decent auto repair experience).
This is not an easy job due to the location of the crank sensor.

Below are the steps I used to replace the crankshaft position sensor.
The steps are for a 2004 Nissan Altima with a 2.5 liter engine.

Nissan has a crank and cam sensor kit. I would not buy any aftermarket sensors because of the effort required to replace the sensors. (I do not work for Nissan). The information below is compiled of tips I found on the internet and my own experience. Even though these procedures may appear lengthy, it took me much longer to figure out the correct steps involved for this task.
Even though I have included all of the steps (and hints) I used… THIS IS NOT AN EASY JOB FOR THE “DO IT YOURSELFER”

CRANK SENSOR IS LOCATED AT FIRE WALL SIDE OF BLOCK BETWEEN MOTOR MOUNT AND FLYWHEEL. YOU GET TO IT FROM TOP.
Remove the (4) allen head bolts that hold the plastic engine cover. Remove the air tube that connects the throttle chamber to air filter box. Pull off the valve cover breather hose with the air tube. Now place a drop light under the two rubber heater hoses (at the firewall on the drivers hand side), shining the light forward towards the back side of the block (below the intake runners). To see the crankshaft sensor and connector, look between the valve cover and the throttle chambers (intake runners) on the drivers side, look straight down toward the ground… look for the sensor with a black wire connector with a green tab on the side, held to the engine block with a gold colored 10mm hex headed bolt. You will need to view the sensor from this position as you are following the steps below to remove and install the crank sensor. There is a large wiring harness bracket attached to the transmission bell housing that was temporarily unbolted to aid with the removal and installation of the crank sensor.

What turned out to be the biggest problem was the connector securing the wiring harness to the sensor. Unlike the camshaft position sensor connector that is removed by squeezing in on a tab located at the top of the connector, the crank position sensor was secured to the harness via some green colored push button assembly. To remove the crank sensor connector, the green tab must depressed ALL THE WAY DOWN (towards the block) UNTIL THE GREEN TAB LOCKS INTO PLACE - REMAINING IN A “PUSHED IN” POSITION (You should hear a “click”). I was able to accomplish this by viewing the connector as described above and at the same time, reach around the back side of the engine using a 6” – 8” flat blade screw driver (with a large head) and push the green tab in towards the block until it locked into place. After the green tab was depressed and locked, (still viewing from above) I repositioned my hand holding a smaller flat blade screw driver to gently pry the connector off the sensor inserting the blade of the screw driver between the bottom of the connector and the crank sensor (a slight twist should do it). I do not recommend pulling on the connector wires or trying to pull the connector off with pliers as damage may result - because in my world of auto repair, if there is a chance that something will break because I am not careful… IT WILL BREAK! After you have removed the connector and while viewing from above, use a ¼” drive ratchet with a 6” extension and a 10mm socket to loosen the gold bolt holding the crank sensor in place. I recommend that you loosen the bolt with the socket, then reach your hand around to the connector and remove the bolt by hand. After the bolt is removed, use an 8” slip jaw pliers - set at its widest opening setting – to grab the sensor. First twist then pull out the sensor.

Be sure to clean the inside of the sensor’s wiring connector with break cleaner spray and blow out with compressed air to get rid of any oil that may have leaked into the connector from the defective crank sensor… this is what probably caused the trouble code in the first place.

You are now ready to install the new crank sensor. If you purchased the crank and cam sensor kit from Nissan, make sure that sensor with white dot at bolt whole goes to the crank. Be sure to oil the rubber “O” ring. I was not able to get the green tab on the connector to snap back into place while the new sensor was installed in the block. I installed the connector to the sensor while it was out of the block – the green tab still did not pop back into its original position on its own – so…while the connector was installed as far down as I could push it, it used a small flat blade screw driver to push on the bottom of the green tab towards the top. That did the trick. While viewing from above, I placed the crank sensor back into the block. I was not able to get the rubber “O” ring to seat within the block by hand. I used the gold bolt to draw the sensor in while slowly tightening. HINT: I taped the outside of the washer of the crank sensor bolt to the 10mm socket to hold the bolt on place while I inserted the bolt into the block… you can do this by hand, but I didn’t want to drop the bolt . I also taped the socket to the ratchet extension so the socket would not get stuck on the bolt (it’s a snug fit down there).
If you were able to accomplish the above procedures, the cam sensor is a snap to remove in install. It is located in the driver’s side portion of the head facing the wheel.
Remember to reinstall all brackets and items that were removed.
Good luck!

Oct 17, 2008 | 2004 Nissan Altima

2 Answers

2003 nissan maxima 3.5


is the check engine light on?? i would suspect your crank angle sensor. replace the cam sensors too. nissan had problem(there is a campaign) with those, so they came out with a crank and cam sensor kits. get the kit ( at a dealer ) and install it. actually have your nissan dealer run your VIN number to see if you don't have open campaign for it, if so, they will replace them for FREE. But that's what I would be looking at if one of those came to me to fix.

Aug 09, 2008 | 2003 Nissan Maxima

5 Answers

2005 altima


A common problem on this vehicle is failure of the Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor. Failure of the CKP Sensor will result in the vehicle not starting. The cost to repair the CKP Sensor is estimated at $29.13 for parts and $26.00 for labor.

Jun 29, 2008 | 2005 Nissan Altima

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