Question about Nissan Altima

1 Answer

I drop a screw in the timing chain how do i get it out

Screw drop in the timing chain slot

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Nissan Master
  • 3,103 Answers

Get prepared to go fishing! really! if you can see the screw try to remove it with a magnetized screwdriver.. if it cant be seen.. you cant really recover it..cheap magnetized screwdriver sets are always at biglots or you can use a tool called a mechanical fingers..but the magnetic screwdriver is usually better...good luck..

Posted on Jan 22, 2013

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

2002 suzuki xl-7 Head Removal: Do I need to take the front timing chain cover off in order to take the head off? I don't have a manual yet. Resources hard to get for this vehicle...


the timing chains have to come off , they hold the cams down in the head bearings , so yes id say u have to remove chain cover off to be able to remove the cams !!

(and yes I know theres a bolt on ends of cams )

Oct 20, 2016 | 2002 Suzuki XL-7

1 Answer

How to adjust a cam chain on a honda ct90


KO models are automatic and can't be adjusted. K1 and newer look similar with the same 14mm plug. Remove the plug with a 14mm wrench, some oil will drain out so have rags handy. Inside you will need a flat screw driver to turn a set screw clockwise to tighten the chain. Do this while engine is running. When screw becomes snug the timing chain will change sound also, back screw off about quarter turn and replace outside plug.

Feb 28, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have 2007 BMW 335I that has been sitting in my garage for a month and started very little. the last time I started it the low coolant level light came on. Itis not leaking anywhere. What type of coolant...


Hi Robert, No it is not normal for the coolant level to drop at any time. The BMW has a system which must be bled to free it of all air. The bleed screw is situated on the radiator and has a screw driver slot. Open the bleed screw and replace the coolant with the recommended coolant and then finish topping up with water until all bubbles have cleared from the system. Observe the level and if it drops again have a pressure test carried out on the system as if the level drops again, there must be a leakage. Likely places are hoses, and the water pump. If it is the water pump, the leakage may only be evident during engine operation, unless the leakage is severe in which case you will notice coolant dripping. Regards John

Sep 15, 2012 | 2007 BMW 335i Sedan

1 Answer

Timing guides collapsed dropped timing chains.


if you have the v6 with the 4.0 OHV set the #1 piston to top dead center and then when looking at the gears where your timing chain goes look for a dot on your engion near the small gear and align the dot with the dot on the small gear. you will have to put the chain around both the top and bottom gears at the same time you might need to turn the piston a little past top dead center when doing this to get the little gear to sit in place with the slot on the back side of the gear. ( i just rebuilt my engion )

Jul 08, 2011 | 1997 Ford Explorer AWD

1 Answer

Help! I was changing the water pump on a 2006 Cobalt and I dropped a socket into where the timing chain is...anyone else ever do this? Its not down in the oil pan, and I'm not really sure where it...


If it dropped into the timing chain cover, a long flexible magnet should help you retrieve the socket that was dropped. It will take some hunting but it can be done. Worst case is that you are going to have to remove the timing chain cover and get the piece out, if you do that make sure that you get the timing chain gasket to replace the gasket from the old one.

Jun 16, 2011 | 2006 Chevrolet Cobalt

1 Answer

I have a 2001 Saturn LS1 that has a sort of clicking noise coming from the passenger side of the motor. it sounds external and I have been told it might be the timing chain as my particular model is said...


Here is what you do. Find the VIN for the car and then get on google and find which is the closest GM dealer who was saddled with the Saturn warranty and maintenance burden. Call them on the phone, or drop by, give them your VIN and see if the timing chain recall was ever done on that car. If not then most likely GM will do that for you. If it was done then you are going to have to buy a timing chain kit on eBay or at a parts store and pay someone who knows what they are doing to put it in for you. This is not a repair for a first timer or the faint of mechanical heart. Replace ALL the wear parts which are under the timing cover, not just a new chain.

Before you go off half-cocked, take a very very long large screw driver and put the metal end on each turning component near the ticking sound, then with great care put the handle end on your ear. Please use some sense as this an become a hurtling projectile of death. Whatever is ticking will become clear. Parts stores sell stethoscopes for this, if you have long hair do yourself a favor and pay a bald friend. There is a chance it is not the timing chain.

Mar 16, 2011 | 2001 Saturn L-Series

1 Answer

I need to know how to set thte timing chain


Discoverd this indepth expalaination of process steps involved in the installation of the timing chain from an ASE certified technician. I hope this helps. See the repair manual on the link below.<br /> <br /> Link: <a href="http://www.2carpros.com/forum/2002-jaguar-xj8--gearbox-default-appear-on-dashboard/2000-jaguar-xj8-timing-chain-replacement-vt218070.html">http://www.2carpros.com/forum/2002-jaguar-xj8--gearbox-default-appear-on-dashboard/2000-jaguar-xj8-timing-chain-replacement-vt218070.html</a><br /> <table id="table14" style="BORDER-RIGHT: #000000 1px dashed; BORDER-TOP: #000000 1px dashed; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 1px dashed; BORDER-BOTTOM: #000000 1px dashed" bordercolordark="#000000" width="100%" bordercolorlight="#000000" border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 1px" width="700"></td></tr> <tr> <td style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 1px" width="700"><span class="name" roundtrip="0" lastvisited="3">By <a name="755408"></a><b roundtrip="0" lastvisited="0">Dave H</b>,<b> </b></span><span class="postdetails" roundtrip="0" lastvisited="0">Certified ASE Technician</span></td></tr> <tr> <td style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 1px" width="100%" roundtrip="0" lastvisited="6"></td></tr> <tr> <td style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 1px" width="700"></td></tr> <tr> <td style="BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 1px; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 1px; BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 1px"> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <span class="postbody" roundtrip="0" lastvisited="77">PRIMARY TIMING CHAINS (NON-SUPERCHARGED) <br />NOTE:The 4.0L V8 has no engine timing alignment marks on the crankshaft or camshafts. Engine timing is achieved by installing the Crankshaft Setting Peg (303-531) and Camshaft Locking Tool (303-530). With the crankshaft setting peg in position, ensure the timing flat on each camshaft is in the uppermost position before installing camshaft locking tool. Variable camshaft timing unit may also be referred to as Variable Valve Timing (VVT) unit. <br /><br />NOTE:Special Tools Required: Crankshaft Setting Peg (303-531), Camshaft Locking Tool (303-530), Chain Tensioning Tool (303-532), Primary Chain Wedge (303-533) and Variable Camshaft Timing Oil Control Unit Setting Tool (303-654). See Fig. 232-Fig. 236 . <br /><br />NOTE:"A" bank refers to the right/passenger side of the vehicle and "B" bank refers to left/driver side of the vehicle. <br /><br />NOTE:Each door glass automatically drops 12 mm when the door is opened or when the convertible top is raised or lowered. It is important that windows are lowered before battery is disconnected to allow doors to shut properly. <br /><br />Removal ("A" Bank) <br />Tips Click a link to view tip <br />Tech1Tip: special tool <br /><br /><br />Remove timing cover. See TIMING CHAIN COVER (NON-SUPERCHARGED). <br />Remove the variable camshaft timing oil control solenoid. </span><br /> <span class="postbody" roundtrip="0" lastvisited="77">Remove the variable camshaft timing oil control unit housing retaining bolts and remove the variable camshaft timing oil control unit housing. </span><br /> <span class="postbody" roundtrip="0" lastvisited="77">Remove and discard the variable camshaft timing oil control unit housing "O" rings. <br />Raise and support vehicle. Remove the bolt which secures the Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor to the flywheel housing. Remove the CKP sensor and allow it to hang free under the engine. Remove the torque converter bolts access grommet from the flywheel housing. </span><br /> <span class="postbody" roundtrip="0" lastvisited="77">Install the crankshaft damper bolt (old one) to the crankshaft, hand-tight only. Rotate crankshaft until the triangular arrow indent on the flywheel is visible through the access hole. See Fig. 144. Confirm that the timing flat on each camshaft is uppermost position. <br />Position the crankshaft so that the Crankshaft Setting Peg (303-531) engages fully into the timing slot. Install and tighten the bolt to secure the crankshaft setting peg. See Fig. 145. Remove the crankshaft damper bolt from the crankshaft and lower the vehicle. <br />Install the Camshaft Locking Tool (303-530) to the "A" bank camshafts, aligning the shafts slightly as necessary. Loosen the bolt that secures the exhaust camshaft sprocket and the bolt that secures the variable camshaft timing oil control unit. See Fig. 146. Remove camshaft locking tool. <br />Remove the primary chain tensioner bolts, primary chain tensioner and tensioner backing plate. See Fig. 147. <br />Remove the primary timing chain tensioner pivot bolt and remove the primary timing chain tensioner blade. See Fig. 148. <br />Remove the bolt which secures the primary timing chain guide. Noting the position of the primary timing chain guide, remove the primary timing chain guide from the upper retaining pin. See Fig. 149. <br />Remove the primary timing chain from the variable camshaft timing oil control unit and from the crankshaft sprocket. Clean and inspect all components. <br />Installation <br />If "B" bank timing chain was removed, see INSTALLATION. If not, go to next step. <br />If previously removed, install the timing chain sprocket to the crankshaft. The teeth of the "A" bank and the "B" bank timing chain sprockets on the crankshaft must be out of phase with each other. If they are in phase after installing, remove the sprocket, turn it on its vertical axis and reinstall sprocket. See Fig. 150. <br />Install the chain tensioning tool to the exhaust camshaft sprocket. Reposition the sprocket (and the variable camshaft timing oil control unit) for the most advantageous position for use of the tool. See Fig. 151. Remove the tool. <br />Install the primary timing chain into position over the crankshaft sprocket and the variable camshaft timing oil control unit. There must be no slack on the drive side of the primary timing chain and the sprockets must not be rotated on the camshafts, or the tensioning tool may not fit. See Fig. 152. <br />Install the primary timing chain tensioner blade to the cylinder block. See Fig. 148. Install the pivot bolt and tighten specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. <br />Push the primary timing chain tensioner piston into the tensioner body to provide clearance for installing the primary timing chain. Insert a thin rigid wire through the hole in the end of the tensioner piston to displace the ball from the non-return valve seat. See Fig. 153. With the wire in position, press the piston fully into the tensioner body. Remove the wire. <br />Install the 2 primary timing chain tensioner bolts to the primary timing chain tensioner and locate the tensioner backing-plate on to the 2 bolts. Align and install the primary timing chain tensioner to the cylinder block and to the mating slot on the rear face of the primary timing chain tensioner blade. See Fig. 147. Tighten the primary timing chain tensioner bolts to specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. <br />Use a Primary Chain Wedge (303-533), or 2 if needed, between the primary timing chain tensioner and primary timing chain tensioner blade, to take up the slack in the chain for tightening of the variable camshaft timing control unit and exhaust camshaft sprocket. See Fig. 154. <br />Using the chain tensioning tool, apply force to the tool in an counterclockwise direction to tension the chain on its drive side. See Fig. 151. While applying opposing force to the sprocket and chain, tighten the exhaust camshaft sprocket bolt to specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. <br />Using the Variable Camshaft Timing Oil Control Unit Setting Tool (303-654), rotate the variable camshaft timing oil control unit fully counterclockwise to the fully retarded position. See Fig. 155. <br />Check that the primary chain wedges are still in place. While applying opposing force to the sprocket and chain using the chain tensioning tool, tighten the variable camshaft timing oil control unit bolt to specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. Remove the chain tensioning tool and the primary chain wedges and camshaft locking tool. <br />Raise and support vehicle. Remove crankshaft setting peg. Install the CKP sensor and bolt to the flywheel housing. See Fig. 143. Tighten the CKP sensor bolt to specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. Install the access grommet to the housing and lower the vehicle. <br />WARNING:Check that the ring dowels are engaged squarely. Fully locate the assembly as much as possible by hand. Failure to follow this procedure may result in damage to the vehicle. <br /><br />Install NEW "O" rings to the variable camshaft timing oil control unit housing. Lubricate the "O" rings and the bushing. Install the variable camshaft timing oil control unit housing. See Fig. 142. Install the variable camshaft timing oil control unit housing bolts. Tighten to specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. <br />Install the variable camshaft timing oil control solenoid. See Fig. 141. Install and tighten the variable camshaft timing oil control solenoid bolt to specification. See TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. <br />Install the timing chain cover. See TIMING CHAIN COVER (NON-SUPERCHARGED). </span><br /></td></tr></tbody></table>

Aug 26, 2010 | 2001 Jaguar XJ8

2 Answers

Does anyone have a diagram for the timing marks for a 2002 nissan altima engine 2.5


Hi I have attatched a figure showing proper timing chain and gear orientation. Hope you find this information helpful its not to difficult to set up so you should have no problems.7710f70.gif
let me know how you get on or if you need further asssitance ok

Aug 02, 2010 | Nissan Altima Cars & Trucks

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

Related Topics:

23 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nissan Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76164 Answers

Phil Lovisek
Phil Lovisek

Level 3 Expert

726 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22156 Answers

Are you a Nissan Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...