Question about 2001 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

Roaring sound from pass. wheel well.

I took some of the front but the front end off thinking it was a cv joint. But the shaft that goes into trans had alot of slack in it. prob abot 1/8". I hope I am terribly wrong. but any ideas?

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  • Sarge Jan 21, 2013

    I jacked up the whole front end and took off both tires of the van. my old man located the noise to cv joint, upon inspection we found that we could move shaft up and down a little. Is that the bearing in the final drive?

  • Sarge Jan 21, 2013

    It has a new tire on that side and i can move the shaft behind that cup (that goes into trans) up and down

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  • Ford Master
  • 21,873 Answers

Well it could be a worn tire, but if the axle can slide back and forth, it could be a worn hub bearing. Usually when the hub bearing goes it makes more noise when you take an opposite turn. Turning puts extra load on the opposite side of the turn.
The axle has splines to slide into the transmission and into the hub.

Posted on Jan 21, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 6982 Answers

SOURCE: CV joint questions

A c/v joint is pretty much just a better universal joint in that it permits more flex range than a simple cross. (like a driveshaft universal) If it were possible to make a universal with eight caps instead of four, it would have similar range but would be impossible to install.
Few suv's used in street applications have a true locking front differential as that makes steering very difficult on turns (outer wheel needs to turn faster than one on inside of turn as the outside "circle" is larger.) Most suv's have an "open" differential that permits easy turning. In reality most 4x4's only have two wheels driving the vehicle at any one time. Most optional setups have a positraction diff ( also known as a limited slip as it allows for slippage so wheels can change speed on turns)at the rear giving you a total of three wheels pushing. Off-road guys will often install a posi at the front, or a more radical approach is a "spool" that is 100% locked all the time, making street driving nearly impossible. Your front differential is "locked" or actually connected to the drivetrain by way of a transfer case that does exactly that...It transfers power to the differentials. On some it does this automatically by way of a viscous coupler inside the unit, or others that are engaged by the driver by either an electric servo or a direct lever.
How far you turn the front wheels determines how much stress you are putting on the c/v joint. Most vehicles have a "stop" bolt somewhere on the suspension that stops the front end from turning further than it should. Most times the steering pump will begin to whine as you near the limit.
C/v joints should last a very long time. Generally they fail because though they are internally designed very well, they are protected by a simple rubber boot. Once that boot is torn, split or otherwise compromised, road dirt enters and quickly destroys the joint.
Once you find a split boot you can almost bet that the joint is in one stage or another of failure. The price of the boot is often about one third the price of a complete joint or even a replacement axle with joints installed. therefore changing just the boot is foolish.
Symptoms of a bad joint are clicking binding or vibration from the area of the joint, but, sometimes vibration can be caused by wheel balance or a failed hub bearing. Making good diagnosis important.

Posted on Jan 20, 2010

Ironfist109
  • 3018 Answers

SOURCE: 97 ford explorer/bad front differential..can

Yes is the short answer. Did you blow the gears in your front differential or you going to put a whole new pumpkin in? If you are replacing the entire pumpkin drain it first. Then make sure to support it with a transmission jack first. Remove the tires. Then remover the CV axles and lower the pumpkin. Your vehicle requires a 75w90 synthetic axle lube for a refill. Good luck.

Posted on Mar 06, 2011

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3 Answers

What is a cv shaft


Dear Dianne,
Under the front hood of your Honda is a motor or it is also called an engine.
The engine is hooked or fastened to a large container called a transmission, which is also under the front hood.
In order to get the car to move, there are 2 steel drive shafts going from the transmission to the front wheels.
These drive shafts are about one to 2 feet long, and each one drives a front wheel. That is why there are 2.
These steel drive shafts have a large joint at each end of them, so you see why there are 4 joints.
The joints attach to the wheel on one end and the transmission on the other end.
These 2 steel drive shafts are called cv shafts because they have a CV joint at each end, and these CV joints are a part of the shaft assembly.
The CV shafts "transfer" the movement of the engine to the wheels.

Dec 03, 2015 | 2007 Honda CR-V

1 Answer

What would make a trans squeal while driving down the road?


You don't say, Front or rear wheel drive. First check oil level, On rear wheel drive check the thrower plate on the tail shaft at the diff end is not bent and rubbing on the seal, A dry oil seal can make this noise.so can the U/Joints. on front wheel drive , check the cv joints , dry oil seals , the drive shaft inner cv joints have a thrower plate that may be bent. worn or binding brakes can make this noise also.

Sep 24, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to remove axle from front of 1998 windstar


  1. Raise and support the vehicle safely.
  2. Remove the front wheels.
  3. Insert a steel rod into the brake rotor to prevent the rotor from turning and loosen the axle wheel hub nut. Discard the nut.
  4. Remove the ball joint-to-front wheel knuckle retaining nut. Drive the bolt out of the front wheel knuckle using a punch and hammer.
  5. Remove the front brake anti-lock sensor and position it out of the way.
  6. Separate the ball joint from the front wheel knuckle using a prybar. Position the end of the prybar outside of the bushing pocket to avoid damage to the bushing.
Use care to prevent damage to the front wheel driveshaft joint boot.
  1. Remove the stabilizer bar link at the front stabilizer bar.
Make sure the CV-joint puller does not contact the transaxle shaft speed sensor. Damage to the sensor will result.
  1. Install a CV-Joint Puller (T86P-3514-A1) or equivalent between the inboard CV-joint and the transaxle case.
  2. Install a CV-Joint Extension (T86P-3514-A2) or equivalent into the puller and hand-tighten.
  3. Using an impact slide hammer, remove the driveshaft from the transaxle.
Do not allow the front wheel driveshaft and joint to hang unsupported. Damage to the front wheel driveshaft joint may result. Do not wrap wire around the front wheel driveshaft joint boot. Damage to the boot may result.
  1. Support the end of the driveshaft and joint assembly by suspending it from the chassis using a length of wire.
Never use a hammer to separate the outboard front wheel driveshaft joint from the wheel hub. Damage to the outboard front wheel driveshaft joint threads and internal components may result.
  1. Separate the outboard front wheel driveshaft joint from the wheel hub using a Front Hub Remover/Replacer (T81P-1104-C) or equivalent. Make sure the hub remover adapter is fully threaded onto the hub stud.
Do not move the vehicle without the outboard CV-joint properly installed, as damage to the bearing may occur.
  1. Remove the front wheel driveshaft and joint assembly from the vehicle.
To install:
Do not reuse the retainer circlip. A new circlip must be installed each time the inboard CV-joint stub shaft is installed into the transaxle differential.
  1. Install a new retainer circlip on the inboard CV-joint stub shaft by starting one end in the groove and working the retainer circlip over the inboard shaft housing end and into the groove. This will avoid overexpanding the circlip.
A non-metallic mallet may be used to aid in seating the retainer circlip into the differential side gear groove. If a mallet is necessary, tap only on the outboard CV-joint stub shaft.
  1. Carefully align the splines of the inboard CV-joint stub shaft housing with the splines in the differential. Exerting some force, push the inboard CV-joint stub shaft housing into the differential until the retainer circlip is felt to seat in the differential side gear. Use care to prevent damage to the inboard CV-joint stub shaft and transaxle seal.
  2. Carefully align the splines of the outboard front wheel driveshaft joint with the splines in the wheel hub, and push the shaft into the wheel hub as far as possible.
  3. Temporarily fasten the front disc brake rotor to the wheel hub with washers and two lug nuts. Insert a steel rod into the front disc brake rotor and rotate clockwise to contact the front wheel knuckle, to prevent the front disc brake rotor from turning during front wheel driveshaft and joint installation.
A new front axle wheel hub retaining nut must be installed.
  1. Manually thread the front axle wheel hub retaining nut onto the outboard CV-joint stub shaft housing as far as possible.
A new bolt and nut must be used to connect the front suspension arm to the knuckle.
  1. Connect the front suspension lower arm to the front wheel knuckle. Tighten the nut and bolt to 40-55 ft. lbs. (54-74 Nm).
  2. Install the front brake anti-lock sensor.
  3. Connect the front stabilizer bar link and tighten to 35-45 ft. lbs. (47-65 Nm).
Do not use power or impact tools to tighten the hub nut.
  1. Tighten the front axle wheel hub retaining nut to 157-212 ft. lbs. (213-287 Nm).
  2. Install the front wheels and lower the vehicle.
  3. Using the recommended type of fluid, fill the transaxle to the proper level.

Jul 07, 2014 | 1998 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

Replaced front hubs and still have roaring noise


clicking noise from front end while spinning tyres is an indication of failing cv joints. especially while turning the wheel from left to right. Suggest you replace the shafts

Jan 27, 2013 | 2004 Chevrolet Tahoe

1 Answer

2001 windstar final drive


What direction of `play'are you meaning? You mean in and out,or up and down, or rotational contact? don-ohio

Jan 21, 2013 | 1998 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

I have bad roaring in front left side while driving,


Sounds like a wheel bearing or a bad CV shaft or u joint in the front end drive shafts, if it is 4 wheel drive. it also could be a break pad rubbing cause the caliper is stuck pressed in.

Apr 11, 2012 | 1999 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

99 geo metro automatic transmission grinds when put into gear,it happened with no warning of a malfuction,what happened?


CV Joints can break internally and cause the sound similar to trans problems.

You will either need a new axle/CV Joint, or to probably replace/rebuild the Transaxle completely.

You may be able to tell more from underneath with someone turning the wheel as you watch the CV Joint housing to make sure it's moving at the same time on both ends. If one end of the shaft moves, the other should move equally, not just the axle shaft, the ends that go into the trans and through the front wheels!


Good luck!

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1 Answer

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Two likely problems.

CV Joint, or Wheel Bearing... constant "roaring" that does not change under power, breaking or turning is likely a Bearing, worse when turning or accelerating, CV Joint. Both fun to fix...!

Peace,

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My explorer makes a clicking/crunching sound in the front pass. side when i turn my wheel to the right.


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2 Answers

Big noise when in 4x4 on corners


I'm betting you will be running into a problem I am dealing with shortly. I would advise you to check your front axles possibly the transfer case as well, luckily you can drive straight in the 4x4 mode, mine grinds as soon as i move the lever, it might not be the wheel bearings, however it could be the CV joints, and if that is the case you may want to look into swapping your axles out. I'm not a professional Jeep guy but mine has had almost every problem it can have, just some advice, hope it helps.

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