Question about 1991 Dodge Dakota

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Replacing freeze plug - 1991 Dodge Dakota

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  • dorothea1221 Mar 02, 2009

    i need to know how to put a freeze plug in a 1999 dodge stratus.

  • Stan Moffett May 11, 2010

    why do you need to replace is it leaking and what size motor

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Wich ever one leaking you take a puch or a drift and put on one side of the plug and smack it with a hammer until it turns side ways.Then you simply take a pair of pliars and pull it out of the bore.After cleaning the bore take the new plug and coat the edges lightly with RTV sealant (black is my favorite choice) line the new plug up squarly to the bore and with a socket that just slides into the plug drive it into the block with a hammer.TAKE NOTE ON HOW DEEP THAT THE PLUG IS IN BEFORE TAKING IT OUT.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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I cant find the freeze plug 1997 mazda protege


If you cannot find the freeze plug, it is probably because you have no idea what you are looking for. First off, there isn't just "A" freeze plug on an engine, there are numerous ones located all around the block and sometimes on the cylinder heads as well. Some are concealed between the engine rear and firewall, some may be concealed behind accessories such as the power steering pump, water pump, or alternator, and yet others may be hidden between the engine and transmission. A freeze plug is a recessed metal disc that is pressed into the casting to allow expansion of freezing water to pop it out, preventing the casting from cracking in the event of a freeze-up in extremely cold conditions. Unfortunately, these plugs corrode over time and may leak, requiring replacement. The rule of thumb is that if the offending plug is accessible, replace the bad one and move on. If it is not accessible and you need to remove the engine to provide service, then you are best suited to replace ALL freeze plugs since you already have access to them and if one has gone bad, the others may well soon follow. You wouldn't want to go to the expense of pulling the engine to replace a rear freeze plug, only to have to it again in the short-term future. Here is a shot of some freeze plug openings....one with a plug in it and two that are open. Additionally, removal of the freeze plugs also allow for more thorough cleaning of the engine block in the chemical tank during engine overhaul and rebuilding processes.



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Oct 16, 2016 | 1997 Mazda Protege

1 Answer

Where are the freeze plugs on a 1992 F 150 - I am loosing anti freeze from the front behind alternate and above the water pump, changed out water pump and hoses already.


images for Where are the freeze plugs on a 1992 F 150

Freeze plug removal.94" f-150 by an 11year old part 1 ...

? 14:18
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mY4o9kSAhr8
Feb 24, 2014 - Uploaded by Marshall C
Pops from The Kidz show, takes apart a 94" f-150 just to get to one freeze plug on the driver side, on the ...

How To Replace Freeze Plugs - YouTube

? 4:15
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXBpLptUEsA
Nov 6, 2009 - Uploaded by 4x4Husky
A basic tutorial on how to replace freeze plugs on an engine.

Replacing freeze plugs - YouTube

? 3:43
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouxbxE-BMNY
Jun 15, 2010 - Uploaded by realfixesrealfast
When coolant goes bad you may find a freeze plug leaking. They usually rot from the inside out. So, when you ...


Dec 21, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Location of the fteeze out plugs in the engine.


How To Replace A Freeze Plug On A GM 4.3 V6 Engine ...

? 7:23
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zdnd5ikynU
Oct 2, 2013 - Uploaded by hoohoohoblin
Here is how to replace a freeze plug on a General Motors 4.3 liter V6 ... your fine with cutting it out, i use a ...

How To Replace Freeze Plugs - YouTube

? 4:15
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXBpLptUEsA
Nov 6, 2009 - Uploaded by 4x4Husky
A basic tutorial on how to replace freeze plugs on an engine. ...plugs,, holes left over from casting the

Nov 28, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Rear driver side heard freeze plug replacement.


It is impossible to propose a diagnosis without knowing the YEAR, MAKE and MODEL of your vehicle.
That being said, replacement of freeze plugs on any vehicle is not a minor undertaking. The mere failure of a freeze plug suggests poor maintenance of the vehicle over time, and is often a precursor of additional underlying cooling system damage.
To replace freeze plugs, often the engine must be removed, or at least decoupled from the car and elevated, to access the freeze plug location. Once you have access to the freeze plug location, you need to pry out the existing freeze plug, removing all rust deposits from the visible cavity and filing the freeze plug seating surface smooth, then use a mallet and large wooden peg to install the new freeze plug.
Once you are done, it is highly advisable to replace the thermostat in the vehicle, check the condition of the radiator, and be certain to maintain a 50/50 ratio of antifreeze to water, using only filtered water.

May 21, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

This is leaking anti freeze what do you call this ? It look like a plug of some kind. It under a 02 ford mustang. Engine Type 3.8L V6 OHV 12V . Need help asap. Let


That is referred to as a freeze plug. They are placed in engine blacks and heads to prevent cracking should the coolant freeze in the block. The expanding water would push them out. They will rust out over time. They can be removed and replaced. They are just a press-in metal disk.

Mar 21, 2015 | Ford Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

I have a 1998 Ford Expedition. I have been told that I have a bad coolant leak coming from rear freeze plug and that I should replace the engine. My question is, do the engine need too be replaced or do I...


If you look on the side of an engine block you will see a line of circular depressions about an inch and a half in diameter and about a quarter of an inch deep. These are actually holes in the side of the engine block which are plugged with a dish shaped metal plug called a "freeze plug" or "expansion plug". WHAT FREEZE PLUGS DO As with many things on a car, there is an "official reason" and a "REAL" reason for freeze plugs. The official reason (and the source of the name) is this: If you run just water with no antifreeze in your car's cooling system the water can freeze. When water freezes, it expands. If water freezes inside your engine block, it can expand and crack the block, destroying the motor. Freeze plugs (or expansion plugs) will "pop out" and supposedly prevent this. In reality this doesn't work all the time: I've seen MANY blocks destroyed by cracking without the freeze plugs popping out, or if they do pop out the block cracks anyway. THE REAL PURPOSE OF FREEZE PLUGS OR EXPANSION PLUGS Engines are "sand cast". A special type of sand is poured into a pair of boxes. A "die" is pressed into the sand, making an impression of the engine block to be cast. The sections of the mold are then put together and molten iron is poured in, forming the engine. This is why engines have a rough texture on most areas: this is the texture of the sand used to cast them.There have to be "cylinders" made of sand in the middle of this mold to create the cylinders of the engine block. These chunks of sand can't just "float" inside the mold: SOMETHING has to hold them in place. There are little columns of sand that connect the cylinder mold to the outer mold half. The mold for the cylinder "sits" on top of these. After the block is cast, these holes are machined smooth and a "freeze plug" or "expansion plug" is put in to plug the hole.
THE PROBLEM WITH FREEZE PLUGS OR EXPANSION PLUGS The problem with freeze plugs or expansion plugs is that they are made of very thin metal, AND THEY RUST!!! From the factory they are made of galvanized steel, and if you always run a 50/50 mix of antifreeze in your cooling system you should never have a problem. Unfortunately many people don't do this, and the freeze plugs rust through, creating a cooling system leak.When I replace freeze plugs or rebuild an engine I always use brass plugs: they only cost a tiny bit more and will not rust through. The manufacturers don't use brass plugs of course: they cost a few cents more, and they will save a penny anywhere they can: pennies add up to millions of dollars!
SIGNS OF BAD FREEZE PLUGS If you have a bad freeze plug your vehicle will leak coolant. If you have a slow cooling system leak that comes and goes, you may have a pinhole freeze plug leak. l Freeze plugs are in different places on different cars, but normally they will be down the side of the block (at least 3 of them) and in the back of the block, between the engine and the transmission. Some are fairly easy to get to, others require removing various parts off the engine, some even require removing the transmission or engine to replace! Some cylinder heads also have smaller plugs in them, often under the intake or exhaust manifold.So if you have water leaking down the side of your engine, or water leaking from the hole in the bell housing between the engine and transmission, you probably have a bad freeze plug. Sometimes the hole in the freeze plug is very small, and can periodically stop when a piece of crud from the cooling system jams in the hole.
FREEZE PLUG REPAIR If the leak is slow and small, a stop leak or block seal compound might work. I have had good luck with K&W Liquid Block Seal: it's good stuff! Of course, as with any "rig" of this sort, it might not work, might not last for long, and could clog up something else in your cooling system. The right way to fix it is to replace the freeze plug. FREEZE PLUG REPLACEMENT To remove a freeze plug, first hammer it into the block with a big screwdriver or a large punch. It won't go far into a modern engine: there isn't much room behind the plug. When it "pops through" you can easily pry it back out of the hole sideways with a pair of pliers or a screwdriver. Be careful not to scratch the surface of the hole where the plug sits, or it could leak around the circumference of the new plug.
After the plug is removed, clean the hole in the block with sandpaper to remove the corrosion and old sealant. Once again, if you don't do this the new one might leak.Normal freeze plugs are hammered in with some sealant around them. I use aviation grade Permatex sealer.
A special tool is made to install freeze plugs: the tool is available at a good auto parts store. In a pinch you can use a large socket that just barely fits inside the rim of the plug, however this can damage the new plug if you aren't careful.
If you can't get to the freeze plug to hammer it in, you have to take off whatever parts are in the way to access the plug. Sometimes it's easier to remove the engine from the car. Another option when access is limited is an expanding replacement freeze plug. These replacement plugs are made of either copper or rubber. A nut on them expands the plug against the block when tightened. These plugs can be installed in areas too tight to hammer in a regular freeze plug. I have had bad luck with the rubber type: they blow back out quite often. I have had good results with the copper type (made by Dorman).
I have not had good results with either type on Ford products: Ford for some reason makes their freeze plugs in "odd" dimensions, like 1 and 51/64 of an inch. You can get the copper type plug in 1/8 th increments, but it won't expand enough to fit the Ford size. The rubber type will SEEM to expand enough, but it will stay in for a week or so then blow out, dumping all your coolant out in a matter of seconds!!!
So on all Fords I just do whatever it takes to pound a regular style brass plug into the block.

Here are some pictures of a Ford F-150 truck freeze plug job I did.

The hard part is taking the exhaust and intake manifolds off: after that the job is easy. CAUTION! I have one issue with this freeze plug video: He uses no sealant on the new freeze plugs, and he's not using brass freeze plugs.
I always use aviation grade permatex sealant on freeze plugs. It's available at any good auto parts store.Don't use RTV silicone: I've seen freeze plugs "pop out" with silicon seal.
Freeze plugs will work when put in "dry", but they might "weep" a small amount of coolant.
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Apr 03, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is the freeze plug located


The engine in your Ford Explorer has freeze plugs, also called expansion plugs, mounted in the sides of the block. Freeze plugs are supposed to protect the engine block if the water in the engine freezes -- the expanded water is supposed to push out the freeze plug, although that doesn't always happen. Freeze plugs are made of thin steel compared to the engine block, and even with an anti-freeze mixture the plugs can rust out and require replacement.

Read more: How to Replace a Freeze Plug on a 1992 Ford Explorer ' eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7670495_replace-plug-1992-ford-explorer.html#ixzz2IBxfNrjb

Jan 17, 2013 | 1992 Ford Explorer

3 Answers

1991 (4 cylinder) Toyota Camry freeze plug problem


the price is determined by how much you have to remove in order to gain access to the freeze plug to replace it the freeze plugs themselves are just a couple of dollars but could be several hundred to replace due to gaining access to replace you also have freeze plugs sometimes that are on back of engine and require you to either remove engine or transmission to replace also keep in mind that normally if a freeze plug is leaking it is due to a neglected cooling system that is now full of rust that may have to be flushed out

May 03, 2010 | 1991 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

Need to replace freeze plug on engine


both... put some gasket sealer on the outer sides of the new freeze plug before you tap it in.  

Mar 27, 2009 | 1993 Chevrolet S-10

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