Question about 1995 Chevrolet Camaro

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Changed the crankshaft sensor and ignition switch and still does not start

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Did those parts fail a test before you replaced them ?
Assuming the engine cranks, are you getting spark to the plugs and fuel to the injectors ?

Posted on Jan 15, 2013

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2 Answers

97 oldsmobile achieva wont fire changed coil pack spark plugs cam sensor still wont start


Make sure battery has a full charge and battery connections all good.
If it cranks good but won't start, have a helper crank it while you visually check for spark at the spark plugs. If spark everywhere, use a gage and check proper fuel pressure and fuel injector pulse.
If you having a problem with more than one system, I want to check for rpm signal, that usually comes from the crank sensor. Not sure why you replaced cam sensor? I always want to check sensor wiring circuits before replacing anything. Don't replace anything unless your testing points in that direction.

Nov 04, 2016 | Oldsmobile Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

P1336 gm code


P1335 CHEVROLET P1335 CHEVROLET - Crankshaft Position Circuit Possible causes
- Faulty Crankshaft Position Sensor
- Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor harness is open or shorted
- Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor circuit poor electrical connection help.png Help with this
Symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Lack/Loss of Power
- Engine Stall
P1335 CHEVROLET Description
The Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor sends pulses to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) as the reluctor wheel teeth rotate past the CKP sensor. The PCM uses the CKP pulses to synchronize the ignition and fuel injector operation, and to time the interval between each CKP pulse. The PCM determines when an excessive change in crankshaft speed occurs by comparing each new time interval with the previous interval. A misfire causes an unexpected change in the crankshaft speed. A certain amount of acceleration/deceleration is expected between each firing stroke, but if the crankshaft speed changes more than an expected amount, the PCM interprets this as a misfire. The interval between CKP sensor pulses is extremely small. At high engine speeds, slight variations in the following components make misfire detection difficult:
- Crankshaft
- Reluctor wheel
- CKP sensor
The PCM learns variations during the Crankshaft Position System Variation Learning Procedure. The PCM compensates for these variations when performing detect misfire calculations. Only a scan tool can command the PCM to perform the Crankshaft Position System Variation Learning Procedure again.
Perform the learning procedure after the following actions:
- A PCM replacement
- Any operation or repair involving the crankshaft, the CKP sensor, or the CKP sensor to reluctor wheel gap relationship.
- An engine replacement.
- The ignition switch is in the ON position until the battery is drained.


Read more: http://nissanhelp.com/diy/obd_codes/p1335_chevrolet.html#ixzz37IoD1Imx

Jul 12, 2014 | 2001 GMC Safari

1 Answer

4x4 v8 1998 dodge truck won't start


well if ur not getting spark and u changed all of the ignition components lets think about the computer in order for the ignition to work you have crankshaft position sensor that fires the fuel injectors and the spark change that and if still nothing then change the camshaft postion sensor that sensor tells the computer that the 1 piston has came all the way up and it tells the crankshaft sensor to do its thing

Feb 21, 2013 | 1998 Dodge Ram 1500 4WD

1 Answer

I have a 2006 chrysler 300 2.7 engine it did not start up change spark plugs


The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.
For a car to start you need compression spark and fuel. If you put a rag over the schrader valve (looks like a bike tire air valve) on the metal fuel rail and push the center down with a screw driver gas should shoot out if it doesn't you have a fuel problem.They make a spark tester that goes in line between the plug and wire see if you have spark when it cranks. Look up on line for a picture of the crank sensor at auto parts web site and look for sensor front of engine just above oil pan

Nov 29, 2011 | Chrysler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I am working on a 1999 olds alero that wont start just rolls over . The security light is not flashing. I have changed out the ign, & the crank sensor. I started once then i stut it off & tryed it...


IF YOU REPLACE CRANKSHAFT SENSOR IT HAS TO HAS TO BE RELEARNED USING TECH 2 SCANNER.FOR THE IGNITION KEY REPLACEMENT.TURN IGNITION SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION FOR 10 MINUTES WITH ENGINE OFF.WHEN SECURITY LIGHT TURNS ITSELF OFF.THEN YOU TURN OFF IGNITION SWITCH FOR 5 SECONDS.THEN START THE ENGINE.

Jan 20, 2011 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

2000 nissan sentra no ignition wont start


the problem could be with your battery, starter or the starter switch please have a look on them and if still it doesnt work check your starter relay....

Apr 14, 2010 | 2000 Nissan Sentra

1 Answer

I am trying to test the crank sensor on my 99 intrepid and need to know how to test


No-Start Diagnosis
The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.

Nov 10, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Intrepid

2 Answers

I have a 1991 chevy truck, I am getting no spark. I have changed the ECM, distributor and coil. still no results. I have no idea of what to do.


check to see if your truck has a crankshaft position sensor, its usually located behind the harmonic balancer or right near there, if the sensor went bad or if the wiring got messed up there will be no signal to the ecm telling the ecm when to send spark to the coil. the crankshaft position sensor is responsible for telling the computer when to fire the spark plugs based on rpm and timing. check the wires on the crankshaft position sensor, if they look fine, replace the sensor, hope this helps!

Jun 29, 2009 | 1991 Chevrolet Silverado 2500

5 Answers

I think i need to change the crankshaft position sensor.


yes the crankshaft position sensor can cause all these problems at once. they are fairly simple to change and not a really expensive part if you want to check it though you can unplug it and hook a multimeter to it and check ohms as someone cranks the engine. should see a square wave as in 0 ohs to infinity ohms and repeat.

May 20, 2009 | 2002 Kia Sedona

3 Answers

Won't start


NO SPARK OR FUEL PRESSUER

Sep 11, 2008 | 1996 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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