Question about 1995 Honda Accord

1 Answer

No fire just died

Had the coil and distributor checked they said power was going to both and there last thought was that it is the ignition key switch and electoral that goes with it. it has not been put on a diagnostic yet cause i don't have one here at home . But my first thought was the fuel pump they said there was power going to it but i don't here it make a noise and i do not smell any gas.

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1 Answer

I don't think you or anyone else understands the
meaning of diagnostics

There are no computers used at all in working on a car

The professional scan tools & note book type software,
only looks into the cars computer to what it thinks, it sees

Your only checking for codes,no big deal & no car diagnoses
it's self

When you have things checked & have conversations,why not
leave the car to be diagnosed,meaning- find the issues & have
them resolved

Posted on Jan 10, 2013

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 245 Answers

SOURCE: 1995 Civic Dies

you may have a faulty crank position sensor shutting the spark off. this will throw a code into the computer though my suggestion would be to have the ecm read for codes.

Posted on Jun 08, 2009

  • 84 Answers

SOURCE: 1993 honda accord won't start sometimes

Its not your fuel pump! Its the cracks on the soldering inside the main relay.

Posted on Jun 25, 2009

YellowNo5
  • 268 Answers

SOURCE: 1991 Honda Accord won't start

Could be the igniter inside the distributor (unless you have an external coil). Look on your distributor to see if there are 5 wires leading from it. If there are, you have an external coil that is likely bad... If you have only 4 wires coming from your distributor it is most likely the internal ignition inside the distributor ($50.+). AS SOON AS YOU GET IT STARTED CHANGE YOUR OIL. Your fuel pump has loaded your cylinders with fuel and it has probably leaked down into your oil pan making your oil thin and mixed with gas.

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

  • 7353 Answers

SOURCE: The car is not starting all the time. Fuel?

dont drop the tank, theres a access panel in trunk, or under back seat to get to the pump/wires. the MAIN RELAY's are problems on these cars. its a large relay in the drivers side of the dash.

Posted on Oct 19, 2009

  • 105 Answers

SOURCE: my 2001 honda civic will turn over but not start

most common problem with these civics are the rotor and ignitor. i would reccommend starting with a new dist cap, rotor, and ignitor.

Posted on Oct 26, 2009

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1 Answer

1967 GTO with starting problem.


kevin it sounds like its your ignition lock tumbler key and not your switch you can find it at an autozone store near you.

Apr 27, 2014 | 1967 Pontiac GTO

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1990chevy suburban 2500 350 died while driving and won't restart I can hear the fuel pump turn on I have changed the fuel filter and still nothing what's next


check for spark, no spark, no fire engine wont run, possible bad ignition coil, wire from coil to distributor cap, no power to ignition coil from ignition switch (rare) wire broken to ignition coil (even rarer)

Jul 09, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

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89 k1500 towed, now fuel injectors dont fire. read all wired to and from ecm, check good. ecm will start another truck.


Check the ECM fuse and then check for any loose wire connectors, especially at the fire-wall area, the ignition coil, and the distributor. Then check for battery voltage at the positive side of the ignition coil when the ignition key is in the "On" or "Run" position, and there should also be battery voltage running over from a wire that is also connected to the positive side of the ignition coil, and then that wire will run over from the ignition coil to the ignition module inside of the distributor, and if there is battery voltage there at the ignition module, then either the ignition module or the pick-up coil inside of the distributor will be the most likely suspects for the cause of the problem.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is actually what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like it could also be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.


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Sep 18, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

Twincam engine light comes on and kills motor


the engine starting only when doing a push start sounds like a bad ignition switch. the coil and ignitor are getting power with the ignition switch at "on" but not at the "start" position.

May 19, 2009 | 1990 Toyota Corolla

2 Answers

No spark to plugs or coil.


Do you have power to the coil with the key in the run position and when cranking? (ignition switch)

Mar 26, 2009 | 1987 Ford F 150

1 Answer

1995 Galant won't start


if it turn over, its not anything to do with the anti-theft system, neutral/safety switch or clutch switch. If your going to start it by pulling out the ignition switch and turning it with a screwdriver, remember that the steering wheel will lock if you try to turn. you can either drill out the tumblers from the key cylinder and turn it with a screwdriver or drill out the breakaway bolts that secure the wheel lock to the steering column.
First check for spark. if your getting spark, check the firing order.

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the distributor houses a built in ignition coil and ignition power transistor. so if either goes bad you need to change the distributor. to check the coil measure the resistance between the two terminals of the distributor. it should be 0.9–1.2 ohms. then measure the resistance between the secondary ignition coil terminal on top of the distributor cap and each of the 2 pins. 20–29K ohms.f53ce6e.jpg


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I have the same problem with my 86 GL 4WD. One day it started to turn, and then lost all power. I couldn't even turn on the lights. I have played with the ignition switch wires, and gotten it to fire. I think there may be a short somewhere in the switch or the wires to the harness, but I have not isolated it yet. You might check your ignition switch and wiring...

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1 Answer

I'm not getting any spark to the plugs. Wondering if it is the ignition coils.


I have the same problem... I replaced the distributor, distributor cap, button,control module, Ignition coil and even put a ignition/start switch on it.... and it finally fired up after the coil.. BUT..... it died 2 days later and i took the coil back for an exchange and it worked.... BUT.... it died on me when the truck warmed up and still does... Someone told me to check the CAMSHAFT POSITIONING SENSOR... makes sense so im gonna try that tomorrow and hope for the best.

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