Question about 1998 Mazda MPV

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No spark getting power to the distributor but no spark/how to test for resistance of distributor?

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  • rhorton Jan 21, 2009

    How do you test crankshaft sensor in 1998 mazda mpv?

  • Anonymous Jan 21, 2009

    No not getting fire at the plugs.

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  • Master
  • 2,920 Answers

Check the crankshaft sensor it may be bad

Posted on Jan 20, 2009

  • Ronnie Houston Jan 21, 2009

    i dont know that u can test it i think you just replace them. are u getting fire at the plugs? do you know ?

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2001 s10 no spark no power to fuel pumpe eng cranks over


Hello Gary,

Lets start with the no spark...


Diagnosis & Testing

http://www.autozone.com/repairinfo/repairguide/repairGuideContent.jsp?pageId=0996b43f803714e1


The Distributor Ignition (DI) system is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

The Distributorless Ignition System (DIS) is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

Testing The Ignition Coil

  1. Remove the ignition coil(s).
  2. Using an ohmmeter, check the resistance between the primary terminals on the underside of the coil. The resistance should be 0.50-0.90 ohms.
  3. Check the resistance between the secondary terminals. It should be 5000-10,000 ohms.
  4. If the coil failed either test, replace the coil.
If the coils(s) are good check the ignitions leads by measuring their resistance. (Multi Meter required.) If the coil(s) and leads are good

Secondary Spark Test
http://www.autozone.com/repairinfo/repairguide/repairGuideContent.jsp?pageId=0996b43f80371564


Please provide some details on your engine option 4 cylinder/6cylinder 2 WD 4 WD. Mileage...

Jul 24, 2016 | 2001 Chevrolet S-10

3 Answers

Engine stop


If theres no spark from the spark plugs then you would have to replace them?

Jul 12, 2008 | 1993 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

How to check ignition coil for proper operation


  1. Connect an ohmmeter between the TACH and BAT terminals in the distributor cap. The primary coil resistance should be 0 or nearly 0 ohms . If not replace the coil.
  2. To check the coil secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the rotor button and the BAT terminal. Note the reading. Connect the ohmmeter between the rotor button and the TACH terminal. Note the reading. The resistance in both cases should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms. Be sure to test between the rotor button and both the BAT and TACH terminals.
  3. Replace the coil only if the readings in Step 1 and Step 2 are infinite resistance or out of specification.
jturcotte_2418.gif





All tests included below.

The symptoms of a defective component within the HEI system are exactly the same as those you would encounter in a conventional system. Some of these symptoms are:


Hard or No Starting Rough Idle Poor Fuel Economy Engine misses under load or while accelerating.
If you suspect a problem in your ignition system, there are certain preliminary checks which you should carry out before you begin to check the electronic portions of the system. First, it is extremely important to make sure the vehicle battery is in a good state of charge. A defective or poorly charged battery will cause the various components of the ignition system to read incorrectly when they are being tested. Second, make sure all wiring connections are clean and tight, not only at the battery, but also at the distributor cap, ignition coil, and at the electronic control module.
Instruments designed specifically for testing HEI systems are available from several tool manufacturers. Some of these will even test the module itself. However, the tests given in this section will require only an ohmmeter and a voltmeter.

CAUTION The HEI ignition system can generate voltage of 30,000-50,000 volts. When testing the system, DO NOT hold a spark plug wire while the engine is running or cranking. Personal injury and or damage to the ignition system may result if this caution is not followed.
Since the only change between electronic and conventional ignition systems is in the distributor component area, it is imperative to check the secondary ignition circuit first. If the secondary circuit checks out properly, then the engine condition is probably not the fault of the ignition system.
If the engine won't start, perform this test. This will narrow the problem area down considerably.
  1. Remove one of the plug wires and insert a HEI spark tester tool in the plug socket.
  2. Ground the spark tester to the block and crank the engine. DO NOT touch the spark plug wire while the engine is cranking.
  3. The spark should be crisp and bright blue in color. If a normal spark occurs, try each spark plug wire until a no spark condition or a weak orange color spark is found. If all sparks are good, the problem is probably not in the ignition system. Check for fuel system problems, or fouled spark plugs.

If no spark occurs, check for the presence of normal battery voltage at the battery (BAT) terminal in the distributor cap. The ignition switch must be in the ON position for this test. Either a voltmeter or a test light may be used for this test. Connect the test light wire to ground and the probe end to the BAT terminal at the distributor. If the light comes on, you have voltage to the distributor. If the light fails to come on, this indicates an open circuit in the ignition primary wiring leading to the distributor. In this case, you will have to check wiring continuity back to the ignition switch using a test light. If there is battery voltage at the BAT terminal, but no spark at the plugs, then the problem lies within the distributor assembly. Go on to the distributor components test section.


If the engine runs, but runs roughly or cuts out, make sure the plug wires are in good shape first. There should be no obvious cracks or breaks. You can check the plug wires with an ohmmeter, but do not pierce the wires with a probe.
If the plug wires are OK, remove the cap assembly and check for moisture, cracks, chips, carbon tracks, or any other high voltage leaks or failures. Replace the cap if any defects are found. Make sure the timer wheel rotates when the engine is cranked. If everything is all right so far, go on to the distributor components test section.
DISTRIBUTOR COMPONENTS TESTINGSee Figures 2 and 3
If the trouble has been narrowed down to the units within the distributor, the following tests can help pinpoint the defective component. An ohmmeter with both high and low ranges should be used. These tests are made with the cap assembly removed and the battery wire disconnected. If a tachometer is connected to the TACH terminal, disconnect it before making these tests.
  1. Connect an ohmmeter between the TACH and BAT terminals in the distributor cap. The primary coil resistance should be 0&omega or nearly 0&omega . If not replace the coil.
  2. To check the coil secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the rotor button and the BAT terminal. Note the reading. Connect the ohmmeter between the rotor button and the TACH terminal. Note the reading. The resistance in both cases should be between 6,000 and 30,000&omega. Be sure to test between the rotor button and both the BAT and TACH terminals.
  3. Replace the coil only if the readings in Step 1 and Step 2 are infinite resistance or out of specification.

jturcotte_2419.gif

Fig. Fig. 2: Checking coil resistance. Ohmmeter 1 shows primary test. Ohmmeter 2 shows secondary test.
These resistance checks will not disclose shorted coil windings. This condition can only be detected with scope analysis or a suitably designed coil tester. If these instruments are unavailable, replace the coil with a known good coil as a final coil test.

  1. To test the pick-up coil, first disconnect the white and green module leads. Set the ohmmeter on the high scale and connect it between a ground and either the white or green lead. Any resistance measurement less than infinite requires replacement of the pick-up coil.
  2. Pick-up coil continuity is tested by connecting the ohmmeter (on low range) between the white and green leads. Normal resistance is between 650 and 850&omega, or 500 and 1,500&omega on 1977 and later models. Move the vacuum advance arm while performing this test (early models). This will detect any break in coil continuity. Such a condition can cause intermittent misfiring. Replace the pick-up coil if the reading is outside the specified limits.
  3. If no defects have been found at this time, and you still have a problem, then the module will have to be checked. If you do not have access to a module tester, the only possible alternative is a substitution test. If the module fails the substitution test, replace it.

jturcotte_2420.gif

Fig. Fig. 3: Pick-up coil testing

Oct 24, 2011 | 1989 Buick Park Avenue

2 Answers

No spark from coil 1991 chrysler labaron v 6


Start by testing the ignition coil primary, and secondary resistance.

To measure the primary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals (the terminals which are connected to the engine wiring harness) on the coil. To test the secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the positive (+) coil terminal and the high voltage cable terminal on the coil. Then, measure the resistance between the positive (+) coil terminal and the coil case; the resistance for the case should exhibit infinite resistance. For coils manufactured by Diamond, the primary resistance at 70-80°F (21-27°C) should be 0.97-1.18 ohms and the secondary resistance should be 11,300-15,300 ohms. Coils built by the Toyodenso company should exhibit a primary resistance at 70-80°F (21-27°C) of 0.95-1.20 ohms and a secondary resistance of 11,300-13,300 ohms. Replace any coil with a new one if it does not meet the specifications.

FAILURE-TO-START TEST Before proceeding with this test make certain that spark has been checked for at the coil. Refer to the ignition coil testing procedures. Failure to do this may lead to unnecessary diagnostic time and wrong test results. CAUTION
Be sure to apply the parking brake and block the wheels before performing any test with the engine running.
  1. Check the battery voltage. It must be at least 12.4 volts to perform the test. If the battery voltage is not at least 12.4 volts, refer to Section 1 for battery charging procedures.
  2. Crank the engine for 5 seconds while monitoring the voltage at the coil positive (+) terminal. If the voltage remains near zero during the entire period of cranking, refer to Section 4 for the On-board Diagnostic checks. The checks will test the PCM and the auto shutdown relay.
  3. If the voltage is at near-battery voltage and drops to zero after 1-2 seconds of cranking, refer to Section 4 On-board Diagnostic procedures. The problem is likely to be related to the distributor reference pick-up circuit to the PCM.
  4. If the voltage remains at near battery voltage during the entire 5 seconds, with the key OFF, remove the PCM 60-way connector. Check the 60-way connector for any terminals that are pushed out or loose.
  5. Remove the connector to the coil positive (+) and connect a jumper wire between the battery positive (+) terminal and the coil (+) terminal.
  6. Using the special jumper wire shown in the illustration, momentarily ground terminal No. 19 of the 60-way connector. A spark should be generated when the ground is removed.
  7. If a spark is generated, replace the PCM with a new one.
  8. If no spark is generated, use the special jumper wire to ground the coil negative (-) terminal directly.
  9. If a spark is produced, inspect the wiring harness for an open circuit condition.
  10. If no spark is produced, replace the ignition coil with a new one.
TESTING
  1. Check for stored trouble codes, then proceed as follows:
    • Fault code 11 - proceed to the next step.
    • Fault code 54 - proceed to step 6.
    NOTE: Before proceeding, verify that a minimum of 12.4 volts is available from the battery for operation of cranking and ignition systems.
  2. Test the distributor pick-up signal reference circuit as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Unplug the distributor pick-up connector.
    3. Remove the coil wire from the distributor cap and have an assistant hold it 1⁄4 in. (6mm) from a good engine ground.
    4. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
    5. Connect a jumper wire to the gray (GY) wire terminal and touch the other end of the jumper wire to the black/light blue (BK/LB) wire terminal on the distributor harness connector several times. While performing this, observe the coil wire.
      • If there is spark from the coil wire, proceed to the next step
      • If there is no spark from the coil wire, the problem is in the engine controller or wiring.
  3. Check the power supply to the distributor reference pick-up as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
    2. Connect a voltmeter between the orange wire in the harness connector and a known good ground.
      • If the reading on the voltmeter is 8-9.5 volts, proceed to the next step.
      • If the reading is anything but 8-9.5 volts, check for problems in the circuit between the reference connector and the engine controller.
  4. Check the mechanical operation of the distributor as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Remove the distributor cap from the distributor housing.
    3. Crank the engine while observing the ignition rotor.
      • If the distributor rotor revolves while the engine is being cranked over, replace the distributor pick-up coil assembly with a new one.
      • If the distributor rotor did not rotate, inspect the engine for a mechanical fault and repair as necessary.
  5. If fault code 54 (No distributor sync pick-up signal) is being received, or was received before performing this test, proceed as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Unplug the distributor pick-up connector.
    3. Connect a voltmeter to the tan/yellow (TN/YL) wire of the harness connector.
    4. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
      • If the reading on the voltmeter is at 4 volts, replace the distributor pick-up coil assembly.
      • If the reading is 0 volts, check for an open in the wiring harness between the reference connector and the engine controller.

Jan 30, 2011 | 1991 Chrysler LeBaron

2 Answers

2001 Nissan Frontier 4x4 crewcab supercharged. P0340. won't start. also p0325 power to distributor, no spark, resistor ok, coil resistance ok, distributor checks out ok on scope.


P0340....Camshaft Position Sensor 'A' Circuit (Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
P0325....Knock Sensor 1 Circuit (Bank 1 or Single Sensor)if you have no spark it your cam sensor

Nov 14, 2009 | 2000 Nissan Frontier

2 Answers

My 88 olds cutlass supreme FWD will not start. I have replaced the ignition module and ecm computer. I am getting fuel but no spark. The engine turns over fine.It just won't start. where do I go next?


If the engine won't start, perform a spark test as described earlier. This will narrow the problem area down considerably. If no spark occurs, check for the presence of normal battery voltage at the battery terminal (BAT) in the distributor cap. The ignition switch must be in the on position for this test. Either a voltmeter or a test light may be used for this test. Connect the test light wire to ground and the probe end at the BAT terminal at the distributor. If the light comes on, you have voltage to the distributor. If the light fails to come on, this indicates an open circuit in the ignition primary wiring leading to the distributor. In this case, you will have to check wiring continuity back to the ignition switch using a test light. If there is battery voltage at the BAT terminal, but no spark at the plugs, then the problem lies within the distributor assembly.
If the trouble has been narrowed down to the units within the distributor, the following tests can help pinpoint the defective component. An ohmmeter with both high and low ranges should be used. These tests are made with the cap assembly removed. and the battery wire disconnected. If a tachometer is connected to the TACH terminal, disconnect it before making these tests.
  1. Connect a ohmmeter between the TACH and BAT terminals in the distributor cap. The primary coil resistance should be less than 1 ohms.
  2. To check the coil secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the rotor button and the BAT terminal. Note the reading. Connect the ohmmeter between the rotor button and the TACH terminal. Note the reading. The resistance in both cases should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms. Be sure to test between the rotor button and both the BAT and TACH terminals.
  3. Replace the coil only if the readings in Step 1 and Step 2 are infinite.

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Nov 13, 2009 | 1988 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

2 Answers

I have no spark i replaced the spark plugs spark wires and the coil pack and still nothing my power distribution box is fine any ideas


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead. (don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark. It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens. Wiring tests ok. ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Sep 29, 2009 | 1992 Ford Ranger

1 Answer

Hi, 94 seville, no spark, how do I check crank and cam sensors? coil pack? ignition control module? I am trying to determine why no spark. Any help in explaining how to check these items would be great....


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Jun 27, 2009 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

No spark in my 1999 silverado 4x4 4.8 engine


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Jun 01, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

97 saturn sl1 drove in fine, won't start just crank. no spark


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Jan 12, 2009 | 1997 Saturn SL

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