Question about 2004 Ford F250

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Heater blowes hot when engian is revved up

Blowes cold air when pickup idles

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  • Master
  • 937 Answers

The best and faster way to heat a car up is to drive. I know that it is a cold ride but that is the fastest way.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Posted on Jan 07, 2013

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 185 Answers

SOURCE: 2003 Ford explorer heater blowes out cold air

Check your anitfreeze level,.

and your thermostat if the level is OK.

Posted on Mar 14, 2010

vmhreha
  • 77 Answers

SOURCE: air condition/heater

sounds like the air-conditioning expansion valve is probably not working correctly here is a way you can fix your air conditioning:

  1. Realize that auto AC is basically a refrigerator in a weird layout. It's designed to move heat from one place (the inside of your car) to some other place (the outdoors). While a complete discussion of every specific model and component is well outside the scope of this article, this should give you a start on figuring out what the problem might be and either fixing it yourself or talking intelligently to someone you can pay to fix it.
  1. Become familiar with the major components to auto air conditioning:

  2. the compressor, which compresses and circulates the refrigerant in the system
  • the refrigerant, (on modern cars, usually a substance called R-134a older cars have r-12 freon which is becoming increasingly more expensive and hard to find, and also requires a license to handle) which carries the heat
  • the condenser, which changes the phase of the refrigerant and expels heat removed from the car
  • the expansion valve (or orifice tube in some vehicles), which is somewhat of a nozzle and functions to similtaneously drop the pressure of the refrigerant liquid, meter its flow, and atomize it
  • the evaporator, which transfers heat to the refrigerant from the air blown across it, cooling your car
  • the receiver/dryer, which functions as a filter for the refrigerant/oil, removing moisture and other contaminants
  1. Understand the air conditioning process: The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again.
  2. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) poke a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem.
  3. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pumplike thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system).
  4. Look for other things that can go wrong: bad switches, bad fuses, broken wires, broken fan belt (preventing the pump from turning), or seal failure inside the compressor.
  5. Feel for any cooling at all. If the system cools, but not much, it could just be low pressure, and you can top up the refrigerant. Most auto-supply stores will have a kit to refill a system, and it will come with instructions. Do not overfill! Adding more than the recommended amount of refrigerant will NOT improve performance but actually will decrease performance. In fact, the more expensive automated equipment found at nicer shops actually monitors cooling performance real-time as it adds refrigerant, and when the performance begins to decrease it removes refrigerant until the performance peaks again.

Posted on Jun 05, 2008

duane_wong
  • 6826 Answers

SOURCE: my heater is blowing cold air, and it wont blow

OK, a vacuum controlled blend door is the problem.


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION


See Figure 1



0996b43f8020d980.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

Fig. Fig. 1: Plenum door vacuum motors

  1. Disconnect the vacuum hose at the motor.
  2. Remove the 2 motor attaching screws.
  3. Rotate the assembly so that the slot in the bracket is parallel to the tee-shaped end of the door crank arm, and pull the motor and bracket off the crank arm.
  4. Installation is the reverse of removal.
--- Search for other vacuum motors under the dash to see if the vacuum hoses have somehow deteriorated or become detached. --- Try to look up your vehicle on autozone.com for other vacuum motors under the 'heater' section of the 'chassis electrical' section of the 'repair guide' after selecting your 1996 Ford f250 crew cab vehicle. http://www.autozone.com/autozone/repairinfo/repairguide/repairGuideContent.jsp?pageId=0996b43f8038ebd8

Posted on Oct 29, 2010

  • 202 Answers

SOURCE: heater blowes cold air clamping the hose worked

Could be a cooling system problem; Ranges from a leak in the radiator, radiator hoses, coolant reservoir, low coolant, even a bad coolant reservoir cap could cause it. Also water pump is a possibility. If not those, could be a bad blend door actuator.

Posted on Jan 04, 2011

  • 4369 Answers

SOURCE: heater blowes cold air in 2008 ford ranger

air trapped in cooling system. need to burp it out.

Posted on Oct 26, 2011

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The heater in my 1999 Land Rover Discovery Series 1 won't blow cold.


As per your problem mentioned.There are few solved help links to troubleshoot these problems.Go through the list and Click the link below:----
Air conditioner blows air but not cold air http://repairhelpcenter.blogspot.in/2012/07/air-conditioner-blows-air-but-not-cold.html

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Car overheats and Air blows hot at idle? http://howtobyme.blogspot.com/2011/11/car-overheats-and-air-blows-hot-at-idle.html

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Heater blows cold? http://schematicsdiagram.blogspot.in/2012/02/heater-blows-cold.html

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Heat blows cold on drivers side and hot on passenger side? http://schematicsdiagram.blogspot.com/2011/12/heat-blows-cold-on-drivers-side-and-hot.html---------- Hot air on the driver's side vents only? http://repairhelpcenter.blogspot.com/2012/01/hot-air-on-drivers-side-vents-only.html

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2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser: A/C Blows Warm? http://whoisbyme.blogspot.in/2012/06/2005-chrysler-pt-cruiser-ac-blows-warm.html

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1992 Toyota Camry: A/C Control light Flashing and A/C not Blowing Cold? http://technoanswers.blogspot.in/2012/04/1992-toyota-camry-ac-control-light.html

--------------
No heat, blower blows only cold? http://technoanswers.blogspot.in/2012/02/no-heatblower-blows-only-cold.html

------------
These will help.
Thanks.

Nov 22, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Nice tip! I replaced my heater core about a year ago so I don't really think...


f041a09.jpgWhen dealing with a clogged heater core causing poor or no heat situation, I've had good success doing it myself, for about $25-$30 . First thing to look at is if you can get to your heater hoses, as some may be a nightmare, others are easily accessible, but the closer you can get to the heater core, where the hoses go into the firewall, the better. Many will allow you to remove the heater hoses right at the firewall which is ideal.
With engine cool, I simply remove the heater hoses (after draining down the system and making sure I don't spill antifreeze on the ground where animals can get to it, which if ingested could more than likely kill them), and attach a drill pump, and hose to one of the heater core tubes, then get an extra piece of garden hose, and attach it to the other core tube, and cut it long enough to run it back into a pail, as a return line, to recover the cleaning solution. The hose on the suction side of the drill pump also goes in to the pail. Then add 1 or 2 jugs of CLR, (calcium, lime, rust remover) available at most hardware stores, into the pail as my cleaning solution. With pressure side hose from pump attached to heater core tube, and other hose(suction) from pump inside pail to draw liquid, as well as return hose from core in pail, start up the drill pump, which can be driven with electric, or cordless drill. I circulate it through for a while, then stop and let it sit in the core to work at the calcium etc inside the core for a few minutes, longer the better. After running it through a few times that way, I reverse the hoses at the core, and run it through again, like a reverse flush, and repeat as above, letting it sit in there for a while from time to time. I will normally do this when it isn't urgent that the vehicle be used soon, and if at all possible, I will let the CLR sit in the core overnight just to give it that extra time to break things down inside that core. Then next morning, I will run it through again, and reverse hoses again, run it some more, then I'm done. Remove all hoses, re-attach heater hoses to core, and start vehicle, re-fill cooling system, with heater turned on to remove air in system, and your done. I found this quite effective as well on vehicles that tend to blow cooler air when idling, but get warmer when RPM's are increased, just due to less restriction now in heater core, allowing coolant to flow through better at idle as well as higher RPM's. I've saved $100's if not $1000's of dollars this way, not to mention a lot of aggravation trying to change the heater core. Even if it doesn't get you back to the heat you were getting when vehicle was new, if money is tight, or your just trying to make the vehicle last a little longer before your ready to replace it, this will probably get you the heat you need to get you through until it's warmer outside. If you can't get to the hoses at the firewall location, try following them back toward engine to a location that may be easier to work from. There you would want to buy a couple of "Barbed" fittings (Joiners) the proper size to enable you to cut heater hoses, attach hoses from pump, then re-attach heater hoses together when done. Be sure to get good quality fittings, and re-check for leaks after/occasionally, to be sure. Be sure to check also, that there isn't some type of valve restriction or whatever in the hose between where your planning on cutting hose and the heater core where it's attached, that will not allow flow through, as well as out on return hose. Be sure to store or dispose of cleaning solution (CLR) in a safe place. It does have other cleaning abilities, as labeled on the jug, and a simple coffee filter in a funnel, to filter out the debris from core and poured back into jugs will allow you to re-use it elsewhere, but if you do, please remember it has been contaminated with antifreeze, and if re-used for cleaning or whatever, make sure it's not an application where it may be ingested by animals, or humans. Best bet for safety sake, is to dispose of it properly to avoid that risk. Good luck to all who try it, and please keep me/us informed of results.

on Apr 04, 2010 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Why would my heater blow out cool air when sitting still and then hot air when going down the road and then it's not all that hot


Try flushing or blowing high pressure air through the heater core lines. its sludge build up and need to be flushed through heater core only. check antifreeze fluid level. only put in straight antifreeze, do not mix. most people do not know what mixture should be, so be safe and add straight, it will not hurt it, i run 100% straight antifreeze and never had a problem or worry about it ever freezing and cracking my block, heads or radiator cracking.

Jan 29, 2012 | 2001 Daewoo Nubira

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Heater turns on but won't stay on. its a 99 jeep grand cherokee limited


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more likely it is the heater core, if your heater blowes cold air 90% of the time this fixes it!

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2003 Ford explorer heater blowes out cold air


Check your anitfreeze level,.

and your thermostat if the level is OK.

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'98 S-10 heater blowing cold air - not hot air


will the air flow switch from floor to the mid to defrost? if so then we have a problem with the tempature door actuator. easy to replace just in tight place. Keep me posted for more help or if this was any help thanks

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1 Answer

Heater blows cold air


the heator core has gone out this is a divise that uses hot coolent from the engine to heat the air that blowes tru your vents it is located behind the glove box some times it's tricky to reach look under the hood to find 2 hoses running side by side in to the fire wall on the passenger side to pin point the location

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