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2002 TAURUS DOHC P0351

P0351 CODE COMES UP ENGINE RUNS FINE THEN MISFIRES AFTER A FEW DAYS COIL WAS REPLACED IS IT FAULTY PCM?

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 99 Answers

SOURCE: Check engine light comes on. p0171 and p0351 codes found

From Lusty Kid:

I know the economy is bad, but change all of the plugs. Check your PCV Valve hose, 150 rottens them out allowing air to be sucked in, thus all kinds of codes.

Depending on mileage. Dismount the EGR valve and clean passages. If you are really good dismount the throtle position sensor body and clean out passages with Choke Cleaner., dismount where the EGR valves connects to the engine, clean out passages. Also check the hose thats behind this mounting to ensure is not clogged. If clogged clean it out. If not replace it. Is about 1.5 ft. long, connects to the PCV Valve Hose.

When is the last time you change your harness. Can't remember??? Replace it. Good Luck

Posted on Dec 26, 2008

  • 91 Answers

SOURCE: check engine light is on 2002 taurus SEL DOHC

it could have been running bad with the bad plugs. reset the computer and see if the light comes back on. you may have already fixed it. to reset the computer take the positive cable from the car off the battery and give it 3-5min to discharge then touch the positive cable from the car to the negative cable (still attached to the battery) for about 5 seconds and then hook back up the positive post and that will reset the computer.

Posted on Mar 30, 2009

wyatt1582
  • 453 Answers

SOURCE: 2002 taurus SEL-5 engine codes to go with light and problems

Cylinders 2, 3 have coil packs change out located on back of motor. you will have to take the upper intake off to get to them. Very easy to do. #2 center plug on back of motor #3 is on drivers side of motor. Crank sensor you will have to remove tire on car passenager side next look at crank pulley on left side of block you will se two wires the heat cover running to it.
Change these first it might correct the O2 sensor problem.

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

  • 14036 Answers

SOURCE: loss of power on acceleration. engine bucking.

check transmission fluid.change fuel filter and air filter.try changing up on where you buy gas .because bad gas causes problems.

Posted on Jun 26, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: cannot locate the dpfe sensor

cannot find dpfe sensor on 2001 focus

Posted on Sep 24, 2010

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P0351 code loss of power 2.3L08ford ranger,it warms slow and really need to eliminate1~voltage regulator is where?) & 2~ ground through PCM) 3~knowing limits&threashholds{sensorsIGNcircuit}?Ty 0$


P0351 loss of power ? That's not what this code is about . P0351 - Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit ,you have a bad coil and possibly a bad coil driver inside the PCM . Do yourself a favor an take your vehicle to a qualified repair shop !
P0351 - Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Description: See the description for DTC P0350. Possible Causes: See the possible causes for DTC P0350. Diagnostic Aids: See the diagnostic aids for DTC P0350. Application Key On Engine Off Key On Engine Running Continuous Memory Coil-on-plug (COP) ignition testing - GO to Pinpoint Test JF . GO to Pinpoint Test JF . Coil pack ignition testing - GO to Pinpoint Test JE . GO to Pinpoint Test JE .
P0350 - Ignition Coil Primary/Secondary Circuit Description: Each ignition primary circuit is continuously monitored. The test fails when the powertrain control module (PCM) does not receive a valid ignition diagnostic monitor (IDM) pulse signal from the ignition module (integrated in the PCM). Possible Causes:
  • Open or short in the ignition START/RUN circuit
  • Open coil driver circuit
  • Coil driver circuit short to ground
  • Damaged coil
  • Coil driver circuit short to VPWR
Diagnostic Aids: Use the 12-volt non-powered test lamp to verify START/RUN voltage at the ignition coil harness connector.
Check the coil driver circuit for open, short to VPWR, or short to ground. Application Key On Engine Off Key On Engine Running Continuous Memory All GO to Pinpoint Test JE .

Feb 18, 2017 | 2008 Ford Ranger

2 Answers

Still having problems will not run good. 1997 ford 2.0 escort;new plugs&wires coil;fuel pump still codes 0351;


From a reputable repair website:


P0351 - OBD-II Trouble Code

Auto Systems and Repair

Ignition Coil "A" Circuit Primary/Secondary Malfunction Our emissions expert has put together the following information about the P0351 fault code. We have also included diagnostic procedures you can take to your repair shop if the mechanic is having difficulty analyzing the code.
OBD II Fault Code
  • OBD II P0351 Ignition Coil "A" Circuit Primary/Secondary Malfunction
What does this mean? The ignition coil or coils are responsible for igniting the air/fuel mixture inside the combustion chambers. Without reliable performance from the ignition coil(s) the vehicle will stumble and misfire.
Code P0351 indicates there's an electrical problem in either the primary ( the computer side ) or the secondary ( the spark plug side ) of the Ignition Coil "A" Circuit.
Symptoms
  • Check Engine Light will illuminate
  • Engine idles rough
  • Engine misfires on acceleration
  • In rare cases, the engine may not exhibit noticeable symptoms
Common Problems That Trigger the P0351 Code
  • Defective Ignition Coil(s)
  • Defective Spark Plug(s)
  • Intake Manifold Vacuum leaks
  • Carbon buildup in the Throttle Body air passages
  • Defective Idle Air Control Valve or Electronic Body
Common Misdiagnosis
  • Ignition coil(s) replaced when cause of the malfunction was a vacuum leak
  • Spark Plugs replaced when cause of the malfunction was a vacuum leak

Dec 21, 2014 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Miss fireing


Hi there:

P0351 Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
and
P0352 Ignition Coil B Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction

and
P0354 Ignition Coil D Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction


Work for all coil codes. The COP (coil on plug) ignition system is what is used on most modern engines. There is an individual coil for each cylinder that is controlled by the PCM (powertrain control module). It eliminates the need for spark plug wires by putting the coil right above the sparkplug. Two wires are dedicated to each coil. One is a battery feed usually from the power distribution center. The other wire is the coil driver circuit from the PCM. The PCM grounds/ungrounds this circuit to activate or deactivate the coil. The coil driver circuit is monitored by the PCM for faults



If an open or a short is detected in the driver circuit for coil number 1, a P0351 may set. Also, depending on the vehicle, the PCM may also shut down the fuel injector to the cylinder also.


Symptoms of a P0351 P0352 and P0354 DTC may include:
MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination
Engine misfire may be present or intermittent

Potential causes of a P0351 , P0352 and P0354 code include:
Short to voltage or ground on COP driver circuit
Open on COP driver circuit
Loose connection at coil or broken connector locks
Bad Coil (COP)
Faulty Powertrain Control Module


Possible Solutions:
Is the engine misfiring presently? If not, the problem is likely intermittent. Try wiggle testing the wiring at the #1 coil and along the wiring harness to the PCM. If manipulating the wiring causes the misfire to surface, repair the wiring problem. Check for poor connection at the coil connector. Verify the harness isn't misrouted or chafing on anything. Repair as necessary


If the engine is misfiring presently, stop the engine and disconnect the #1 coil wiring connector. Then start the engine and check for a driver signal to the #1 coil or #2. Using a scope will give you a visual pattern to observe, but since most people don't have access to one there's an easier way. Use a Voltmeter in AC Hertz scale and see if there's a Hz reading of between 5 and 20 or so that indicates the driver is working. If there is a Hertz signal, then replace the #1 ignition coil. It's likely bad. If you don't detect any frequency signal from the PCM on the ignition coil driver circuit indicating the PCM is grounding/ungrounding the circuit (or there is no visible pattern on the scope if you have one) then leave the coil disconnected and check for DC voltage on the driver circuit at the ignition coil connector. If there is any significant voltage on that wire then there is a short to voltage somewhere. Find the short and repair it.


If there is no voltage on the driver circuit, then turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM connector and check the continuity of the driver between the PCM and the coil. If there is no continuity repair the open or short to ground in the circuit. If continuity is present, then check for resistance between ground and the ignition coil connector. There should be infinite resistance. If there isn't, repair the short to ground in the coil driver circuit


NOTE: If the ignition coil driver signal wire is not open or shorted to voltage or ground and there is no trigger signal to the coil then suspect a faulty PCM coil driver. Also keep in mind that if the PCM driver is at fault, there may be a wiring problem that caused the PCM failure. It's a good idea to do the above check after PCM replacement to verify there won't be a repeat failure. If you find that the engine isn't misfiring, the coil is being triggered properly but P0351 is continually being reset, there is the possibility that the PCM coil monitoring system may be faulty.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Aug 07, 2012 | 2004 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Code 0300 ,0303,0351,and2302


Hi there:
DTC P0300 - RandomMultiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
Basically this means that the the car's computer has detected that not all of the engine's cylinders are firing properly.

A P0300 diagnostic code indicates a random or multiple misfire. If the last digit is a number other than zero, it corresponds to the cylinder number that is misfiring. A P0302 code, for example, would tell you cylinder number two is misfiring. Unfortunately, a P0300 doesn't tell you specifically which cylinder(s) is/are mis-firing, nor why.

Symptoms may include:
the engine may be harder to start
the engine may stumble / stumble, and/or hesitate
other symptoms may also be present


A code P0300 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
Faulty spark plugs or wires
Faulty coil (pack)
Faulty oxygen sensor(s)
Faulty fuel injector(s)
Burned exhaust valve
Faulty catalytic converter(s)
Stuck/blocked EGR valve / passages
Faulty camshaft position sensor
Defective computer

Possible Solutions:
If there are no symptoms, the simplest thing to do is to reset the code and see if it comes back.

If there are symptoms such as the engine is stumbling or hesitating, check all wiring and connectors that lead to the cylinders (i.e. spark plugs). Depending on how long the ignition components have been in the car, it may be a good idea to replace them as part of your regular maintenance schedule. I would suggest spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, and rotor (if applicable). Otherwise, check the coils (a.k.a. coil packs). In some cases, the catalytic converter has gone bad. If you smell rotten eggs in the exhaust, your cat converter needs to be replaced. I've also heard in other cases the problems were faulty fuel injectors.

Random misfires that jump around from one cylinder to another (read: P030x codes) also will set a P0300 code. The underlying cause is often a lean fuel condition, which may be due to a vacuum leak in the intake manifold or unmetered air getting past the airflow sensor, or an EGR valve that is stuck open.


DTC P0351 - Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
The COP (coil on plug) ignition system is what is used on most modern engines. There is an individual coil for each cylinder that is controlled by the PCM (powertrain control module). It eliminates the need for spark plug wires by putting the coil right above the sparkplug. Two wires are dedicated to each coil. One is a battery feed usually from the power distribution center. The other wire is the coil driver circuit from the PCM. The PCM grounds/ungrounds this circuit to activate or deactivate the coil. The coil driver circuit is monitored by the PCM for faults

If an open or a short is detected in the driver circuit for coil number 1, a P0351 may set. Also, depending on the vehicle, the PCM may also shut down the fuel injector to the cylinder also.


Symptoms of a P0351 DTC may include:
MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination
Engine misfire may be present or intermittent


Potential causes of a P0351 code include:
Short to voltage or ground on COP driver circuit
Open on COP driver circuit
Loose connection at coil or broken connector locks
Bad Coil (COP)
Faulty Powertrain Control Module

Possible Solutions:
Is the engine misfiring presently? If not, the problem is likely intermittent. Try wiggle testing the wiring at the #1 coil and along the wiring harness to the PCM. If manipulating the wiring causes the misfire to surface, repair the wiring problem. Check for poor connection at the coil connector. Verify the harness isn't misrouted or chafing on anything. Repair as necessary

If the engine is misfiring presently, stop the engine and disconnect the #1 coil wiring connector. Then start the engine and check for a driver signal to the #1 coil. Using a scope will give you a visual pattern to observe, but since most people don't have access to one there's an easier way. Use a Voltmeter in AC Hertz scale and see if there's a Hz reading of between 5 and 20 or so that indicates the driver is working. If there is a Hertz signal, then replace the #1 ignition coil. It's likely bad. If you don't detect any frequency signal from the PCM on the ignition coil driver circuit indicating the PCM is grounding/ungrounding the circuit (or there is no visible pattern on the scope if you have one) then leave the coil disconnected and check for DC voltage on the driver circuit at the ignition coil connector. If there is any significant voltage on that wire then there is a short to voltage somewhere. Find the short and repair it.

If there is no voltage on the driver circuit, then turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM connector and check the continuity of the driver between the PCM and the coil. If there is no continuity repair the open or short to ground in the circuit. If continuity is present, then check for resistance between ground and the ignition coil connector. There should be infinite resistance. If there isn't, repair the short to ground in the coil driver circuit

NOTE: If the ignition coil driver signal wire is not open or shorted to voltage or ground and there is no trigger signal to the coil then suspect a faulty PCM coil driver. Also keep in mind that if the PCM driver is at fault, there may be a wiring problem that caused the PCM failure. It's a good idea to do the above check after PCM replacement to verify there won't be a repeat failure. If you find that the engine isn't misfiring, the coil is being triggered properly but P0351 is continually being reset, there is the possibility that the PCM coil monitoring system may be faulty.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 29, 2012 | 2002 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

2004 Taurus DOHC; All COPs and spark plugs have been replaced. Intermittent problem (car may run great for weeks at a time) Then engine runs very poorly, and these codes come up: P0351, P0352,...


codes p0350-p0360 are all coil primary/secondary failure codes. could possibly be the pcm its self if you have already replaced all 6 coils and plugs. there have also been cases i have seen where a remote start system is the cause, if one is installed check the wiring where they tie into the ignition system

Sep 17, 2011 | 2004 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

I have a 02 dodge grand caravan sport with 0351,0352,0700 codes...car runs good then shakes and even stalls at times,but not all the time...i have replaced ignition coil,wires,plugs,and catalytic...


Do you mean P0351, P0352, P0700? (The "P" makes a HUGE difference - it could also be a "C" a "B" or a "U") When you post fault codes, please be sure to post the ENTIRE fault code.

Anyway, P0700 is a generic code that is output by the Engine Control Module (ECM) to let you know that there are transmission faults present in the Transmission Control Module (TCM). To find out what the problem actually is, you must have a scanner that is capable of accessing the TCM and retriving the codes. NOTE: a "generic OBD" code reader cannot do this.

P0351 is "Ignition Coil #1 Primary Circuit"
P0352 is "Ignition Coil #2 Primary Circuit"

The ignition coil primary circuit is monitored when battery voltage is more than 8 volts during cranking or more than 13 volts with the engine running at less than 3000 RPM, and no coil in dwell during testing. The Diagnostic Test Code (DTC) will set in the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) memory when the PCM senses peak current is not achieved with battery based dwell plus 1.5 milliseconds of diagnostic offset. DTC P0351 and/or DTC Po352 takes less that 3 seconds to set during engine cranking, or up to 6 seconds with the engine running. Possible causes for these DTCs are : Intermittent condition, defective ignition coil (or coils), defective connectors or wiring,defective PCM .

NOTE: Intermiitent failures or problems in the contacts/circuits of the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay can also cause these codes. Some aftermarket equipment , like remote starters and antitheft systems that are connected to the ASD relay circuits can also cause these codes. Any such equipment should be COMPLETELY removed from the vehicle before attempting to diagnose these codes.

Jun 14, 2011 | 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan

1 Answer

Codes p0351 miss and is goverened at 2800 rpms.


P0351 is Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction.
Possible causes: - Open or short in the ignition coil circuit - Ignition coil circuit shorted to ground - Ignition coil connector - Damaged ignition coil - Damaged PCM or
Possible solution - If damage, repair ignition coil circuit - Replaced ignition coil - Replaced PCM or ECM When is the code detected? The test fails when the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) or Electronic Control Module(ECM) does not receive a valid pulse signal from the ignition coil.
P0351 Description: The ignition signal from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) or Electronic Control Module(ECM) is sent to and amplified by the power transistor. The power transistor turns ON and OFF the ignition coil primary circuit. This ON/OFF operation induces the proper high voltage in the coil secondary circuit.
Hope this helps :)

Mar 07, 2011 | 2002 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

Miss fires and stots off when I give it gas as codes 1391 ,0351, 0352, 0353,


P1391 - Not a valid obd code.
B1391 - Oil Level Switch Circuit Failure
C1391 - Not a valid obd code.
U1391 - Not a valid obd code.
Its possible you may have misread this code. If it is B1391 that would be the only code with 1391 for your vehicle.

P0351 - Ignition Coil A Primary / Secondary Circuit Malfunction. The ignition signal from the Powertrain Control Module or Electronic Control Module is sent to and amplified by the power transistor. The power transistor turns ON and OFF the ignition coil primary circuit. This ON/OFF operation induces the proper high voltage in the coil secondary circuit.

Possible Causes:
- Open or short in the ignition coil circuit
- Ignition coil circuit shorted to ground
- Ignition coil connector
- Damaged ignition coil
- Damaged PCM

P0352 - Ignition Coil B Primary / Secondary Circuit Malfunction.
Same repair info as P0351.

P0353 - Ignition Coil C Primary / Secondary Circuit Malfunction.
Same repair info as P0351



Solutions:
- If damage, repair ignition coil circuit
- Replaced ignition coil
- Replaced
PCM or ECM

Jan 16, 2011 | Jeep Grand Cherokee Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine cuts out @2400 rpms


Check the crank sensor. This is very common for this problem. Best wishes!

Aug 16, 2009 | 2002 Dodge Stratus

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