Question about 2004 Dodge Stratus

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2004 Dodge Stratus Transmission

I am having trouble with my transmission.  It seems to be **** when it shifts down to the lowest gear.  It is worse the faster that I am going when I slow down.  I got the full flush done to the transmission and it has not made it a difference.  Any other ideas?  Thanks

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  • saturg Feb 05, 2009

    I'm also having tranny problems in my 2004 Dodge Stratus. Recently it has been sluggish on cold mornings even after I let it warm up a bit. After I make a stop it is extremley slow to accelerate. It just revs and then shoots me forward. I'm no expert, this may be something other than the transmission.

  • Anonymous Feb 27, 2009

    My 04 stratus does not go in gear at 1st. its takes some time move.

  • adam41583 Mar 15, 2009

    I have the exeact same problem in my 2004 stratus when down shifting to last gear I just recently did a flush too .



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Flushing your transmission will actually do more harm than good. Sure, it stirs up everything so that you can pull out the contaminants, but stirring up the debris will clog the valve body and can damage the filter. The best thing to do, if you are looking at changing the transmission fluid is to drop the pan and drain it, then you can replace the filter too and then put a new gasket on there and refill it.

Posted on Sep 12, 2012

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  • Amclaussen
    Amclaussen Mar 10, 2014

    Sorry John Givens, I do not agree with your statement. Of course, a poorly done transmission Flushing can certainly cause more harm than good, but a PROPERLY made one can FIX problems with the Tranny.

  • Amclaussen
    Amclaussen Mar 10, 2014

    The main concern here with a Chrysler product, is that too many people simply don't read the manual and add a generic or common ATF that is NOT the one REQUIRED by Chrysler Transmissions on these cars. The Stratus and Sebring sedans, Minivans etc, all REQUIRE using Chrysler's "ATF+4" to work properly and happily BY DESIGN...

  • Amclaussen
    Amclaussen Mar 10, 2014

    The used ATF cannot mix properly with other more common fluids like MERCON or DEXRON, independently of what fluid vendors may say. Even extra "additives" supossedly meant to "convert" a common DEXRON/MERCON type of fluid, WON'T make the proper ATF+4. In order to correctrly perform a complete Flushing, one has to remove the transmission pan, let it drain completely, replace the felt filter and O-Ring, then replace the pan volume contents to approximately the proper level BUT, as the torque converter houses about half of the used and degraded fluid, it is IMPERATIVE that the technician connects a pair of transparent vinyl lines going to the transmission cooler, so that the proper procedure can be done: the engine is started in PARK, having previously prepared enough extra new ATF+4 bottles to perform the flush. As the engine turng the input trans shaft, the internal pump starts to feed new fluid from the pan through the entire trnasmission, pushing out the old degrades fluid and contaminants from the large capacity of the Torque Converter.

  • Amclaussen
    Amclaussen Mar 10, 2014

    Therefore you need to have READY and opened several more ATF+4 quarts because you haveto add them at the same rate the transmission in park and with the engine running at idle pushes the old out. There is a little intermixing, that is the reason you use abour 14 quarts ATF+4 when the total contents are about 9.5 quarts, as I said, you are flushing with some extra quarts. You can even SEE tha notable change in color through the transparent vinyl line going to the large (16 quart) disposal catch pan, you can even place a white cardboard piece behind and use a 100W bulb to hepl notice the exact moment the old fluid goes out completely, then use a full extra quart or two to leave a 99% new fluid at the proper level (VERY IMPORTANT!).

  • Amclaussen
    Amclaussen Mar 10, 2014

    Unless the transmission has received damage from long neglected maintenance, hard shifting or overheating, hard "launches" and so on, a proper and COMPLETE flush as described cannot cause more harm. The key issue os to replace the frequently forgotten volume of the Troque Converter, thus people and quick oil-change places leave abour 45-55% of old fluid because they ONLY REPLACE the pan contents, leaving crud and degraded fluid inside the Torque converter!

  • Amclaussen
    Amclaussen Mar 10, 2014

    I have done several complete and through ATF changes with full flushing, even addinga small bottle of a product called "WYNN'S Oil System Cleaner" (a violet color little bottle) that helps in dissolving, suspending and lowering a little more the used ATF viscosity, added before the Flushing procedure, and let it work for 5 minutes at idle while manually shifting throuh all shifts in order to circulate the cleaner through the valve body and all conducts. this only needs to be done for 5 minutes and helps speed-up the old fluid drainage too.

  • Amclaussen
    Amclaussen Mar 10, 2014

    It is important to carefully clean and inspect the small magnet inside the pan, and usually a teaspoonfull of metallic debris is normally found attached. More than a teaspoonful and it means wear components coud be ready to be neeed to be replaced, so the Flush cannot eliminte wear, but it will return proper lubrication, hydraulic behaviour, unstick valves, free solenoids and improve shifting quality. But Cghrysler's fluid MUST be used! Again: NO SUBSTITUTE or additive will "convert" a DEXRON/MERCON or ANY other into proper ATF+4!! GOOD LUCK, you cannot go wrong IF you follow this procedure properly. Amclaussen.

  • John Givens Mar 10, 2014

    Flushing and Replacing the fluid are two different things. Flushing, the place (like JiffyLube) will hook up your transmission cooling hoses to a machine that cycles the fluid, where as replacing is dropping the pan and actually draining the fluid.

  • John Givens Mar 10, 2014

    Flushing and Replacing the fluid are two different things. Flushing, the place (like JiffyLube) will hook up your transmission cooling hoses to a machine that cycles the fluid, where as replacing is dropping the pan and actually draining the fluid.

  • John Givens Mar 10, 2014

    Stupid double post. Anyway, to continue, If you drain and replace the filter and fluid, you'll be better off than going to a Jiffy Lube and having them cycle the fluid through a machine. That's what harms the tranny. I am speaking from experience on this one. I had an LHS that, like the Status et.al. only takes ATF+4. I had to drop the pan and drain the fluid, as all the shops that I went to (short of an actual transmission shop, as they were very pricey) just wanted to cycle the fluid, which does pull debris up in to the valve body, causing potentially major damage. Best bet, as already stated, drop the pan, drain the fluid, inspect things, put on a new filter and gasket and refill with the proper transmission fluid based on the owner's manual to determine exact type of fluid to use (Most likely AFT+4), and as also already stated, be sure to have several quarts on the ready, but start with the recommended amount to fill, put in the fluid, and then after you have that amount in, start it up, let it warm up and determine if you have to add more, while also checking for leaks.

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SOURCE: MAF Sensor 2004 Dodge Stratus

If your car has a MAF (Mass Air Flow) sensor, it would be located in the air delivery tube that runs from the air filter box to the throttle plate assembly on the intake manifold. It will have a wiring connector going to it, also. The MAF does exactly what it is called: It "senses" the volume, or "mass" of the air-flow; thusly it needs to be in the intake air tube. If you do NOT have such a device in the air-tube, you have a MAP sensor, (Manifold Absolute Pressure); this is another way of measuring the same air volume, albeit older technology. You will commonly find this device on the firewall, with a vacuum line running to the intake manifold.

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Posted on Mar 06, 2009

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SOURCE: changing thermostat on 2004 dodge stratus

my car just cut off and wont start back

Posted on Dec 18, 2008

emissionwiz
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SOURCE: 2004 Dodge Stratus 2.7 thermostat location

Finding the thermostat: Follow the LOWER radiator hose to where it meets the engine. It's in there. Most cars that I've worked on have the thermostat at the end of the upper radiator hose, but not this car. Replacing the thermostat: You need to remove the thermostat housing. (It's the piece that the lower radiator hose connects to.) - You do not need to remove the radiator hose from the housing. - First remove the bolt that is holding a bracket. This bracket just holds some wires in place. - Now remove the three bolts that hold the housing to the engine block. These bolts can be fairly hard to turn, but just keep trying. - Gently pry the housing away from the engine block. You can use a flat-head screwdriver to help pry, but do not scratch the mating surfaces of the housing and the block. - Pull out the thermostat, noting that the spring end goes into the engine. - When you put the new thermostat in, you probably want to use a new black rubber gasket, but you might be able to use the old one if you have no choice. Also, I didn't add any permatex or anything and it seems fine. - I tightened the bolts to 22foot pounds, but this might be a little high. Whatever you do, DO NOT overtighten the bolts. Couple other notes: I first removed the air cleaner cover and tubes to get a little more working room. I also unplugged one wiring harness to make more room. Otherwise, I was able to get my big hands in there. A new thermostat did not fix my problem. Here is a description of the problem I was having and the solution: Problem: The temperature gauge was spiking occasionally, all the way into the red. It would spike up and come back to normal. It would spike usually while in idle, but sometimes while driving. Usually about once every twenty minutes. Things I checked first: - The plastic reservior for the radiator was full to the top. - The electric fans were running, and running on high speed. - The car had working heat. - Replaced the thermostat. Did nothing to help the problem. Problem Found: - Vapor lock. Even though the reservior was full of fluid, it had previously gotten too low and the system sucked in some air. Once that happens, it doesn't matter if the reservior is full, the cooling system will not draw in the coolant. This is because filling the plastic reservior does not pour coolant directly into the cooling system. The coolant is sucked into the cooling system through a tube, like drinking soda through a straw. So the reservior, where they tell you to add coolant, was full but the cooling system (radiator, engine, pump, etc.) was almost out of coolant and wasn't able to draw in any more. Solution: When the engine is cool, open the metal radiator cap that's sticking right up out of the engine. It can be found by following the upper radiator hose to the engine. There is a tall metal tube with a metal cap on it. Pull that cap off (when it not hot) and fill it up with radiator fluid. (I use radiator fluid that's pre-diluted and designed for all makes and models of cars). Idle the car, in park, for about thirty seconds. Stop the engine and put the cap back on. If you're lucky, all the air bubbles are out of the system and you're all set.

Posted on Dec 02, 2008

polarcycle
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SOURCE: 2004 DODGE STRATUS 2.7L, Location of Crankshaft Position Sensor?

it is located on the right side of the motor, in the trans area. Actually in the bell housing.

Posted on Jun 23, 2009

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SOURCE: replace water pump on 2004 Dodge Stratus 2.4L DOHC

First, I'd recommend you buy a manual, because the water pump is internally mounted, driven by the timing belt. You will also need a puller to remove the crankshaft pulley. You can usually rent/borrow this from the same place you bought the manual. The manual will also show you how to properly install the timing belt and compress the tensioner.
You will need to drain the cooling system, raise the car (safely), remove the right tire, right inner fender, right engine mount (aka front mount), accessory drive belts, timing belt cover, timing belt and tensioner (which needs to be recompressed correctly), and now you are at the water pump. Since the timing belt has to be removed, you should also replace it.

Posted on Sep 19, 2009

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