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Toyota townace noah 3sfe head cam timing

Position of can timing

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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solveditnow
  • 39 Answers

SOURCE: Overheating

Having the radiator rodded is a good move. Retest. If it has an electric radiator fan check temp sensors. If the fan has a clutch it may need to be replaced if its slipping with the engine hot. Check bellts. Its likely a fan air flow issue if the engine overheats when the care is not moving or is moving slowly. If the engine overheats only with AC on that narrows it down. Write back if that's the case. Lots of things can cause this. Antifreeze and a good radiator cap discourages boiling. Pressure in the radiator raises the boiling point but it can't build up pressure if the cap is bad. Antifreeze also raises the boiling point. If actual boiling happens in the engine then steam builds up in critical places and drives the collant out of the block making the engine even hotter than it already is. Replace the cap. Check the antifreeze.

Posted on Jan 06, 2009

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fknstart
  • 404 Answers

SOURCE: I need to find out where the thermostat is on my toyota townace

is it in the lower radiator hose

Posted on Jul 03, 2009

  • 156 Answers

SOURCE: Where do you refill the oil in a Toyota Townace

Dipstick, oil filler , filter etc are under the passengers front seat.
If you lift the carpet immediately in front of the seat, you will see a pair of clips holding down the seat, unlatch them and lift the seat ( in some models they hide a clip in the centre console).
The brake fluid is under a cover in the dash.

Posted on Mar 27, 2010

ftw1952
  • 10319 Answers

SOURCE: have flashing light on toyota townace not sure why

Try this website for resolving car problems by downloading a FREE service manual for your vehicle. This is not an owners manual but a factory mechcanic's manual.

http://ezinearticles.com/?Find-the-Free-Auto-Repair-Manual-You-Need-Online&id=92717

Posted on May 01, 2010

  • 4102 Answers

SOURCE: Toyota Noah overheating

hi the problem you are having could be down to a few problems, now the first thing i would try is the thermostat you can remove this and place it in boiling water to test if it opens up or not if it dont open up the getting this replaced should solve your problem.

now another thing that could be causing you problems is going to be the water pump now if the bearing has gone it wont be pumping the water properly and this can cause the engine to over heat, it can also over heat if the water pump is leaking and letting in air as the air would cause an air lock and the water would not circulate around the cooling system properly.

you should be able to test the thermostat by trying the heater in the car if you get the engine warm then turn the heater on to hot if the air comes out cold then this indicates the thermostat is stuck in closed possition.

your problem could also be water leak so check your coolant level and see if you are losing any water.

another cause could be that your fan is not cutting in when it should you can test this by leaving your car parked up with the engine running and then when the temp reaches near the red or top of the gauge the fan should cut in and then this should cool the coolant and bring the temp down.

I know you say you have had the head gasket checked but check the oil for signs of water take out he oil level stick and check for signs of a whitish liquid like mayonaise if this is present then this points towards head gasket failure.


I hope i have given you some things to check and look for, you should find your problem if you check the things i have told you, if your fan dont cut in then you need to replace the switch that powers the fan so if you follow the wires from the fan they will go to a switch on the engine's coolant system so if your engine boils up before the fan cuts in then this switch will need replacing.

please bare in mind that the engine over heating can cause the head gasket to fail and even worse it can crack the head, so you need to find the fault as soon as you can to prevent further damage being done to your engine

Posted on May 23, 2010

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I m looking for torque settings for Toyota 3s fe main bearings,bigend bearing and cylinderhead bolts


A-series: 1.5L, 1.6L and 1.8L, belt-driven overhead cam motors used in Corollas, later Celicas, early Tercels, Chevy Novas (NUMMI-built), and Geo Prizms;
E-series: 1.4L and 1.5L overhead cam, belt-driven engines used in '88 and up Tercels and Paseos;
F-series: 3.9L, 4.0L, 4.2L, pushrod straight six engines used in Landcruisers;
R-series: 1.8L/2.4L, overhead cam, chain-driven engines used in rear wheel drive only Coronas, older Celicas and pickups;
M-series: 2.2L through 3.0L overhead cam straight six engines used in Cressidas and Supras;
S-series: 2.0L and 2.2L belt-driven OHC engines used in Camrys, Celicas and MR2s;
VZ-series: 2.5L, 3.0L and 3.4L V6 engines used in Camrys, pickups, Lexus ES and T100s;
UZ-series: 4.0L V8 engines used in the Lexus LS400 and SC400.
Toyota manufactures motors from the very small up to large industrial diesels, so this is only a partial listing of the more common engine families. However, hopefully this information will bring some sense of order to the confusing alphabet soup of Toyota engine classifications.
The 2.0LLet's take a look at the 2.0L used in the late '80s Camry & Celica. The code for this engine is 3SFE. The S-series engines are a mid-sized, transverse mounted four-cylinder used in Camrys, Celicas, some MR2s, and other Toyota vehicles. The first letter (after the initial numeral) is an "S" and means that this engine belongs to the "S" group of motors. The "3" signifies the third change in bore/stroke to the S-group of motors.
So, what about other motors? A 3SGE used in the Celica GTS ('86-'89) is the same as the 3SFE in bore and stroke, uses the same block, is also fuel injected, but the cylinder head is a true dual overhead cam with both cams being externally driven. There was also a 3SGTE used in Celica turbos, and MR2 turbos. This is basically the same motor as the 3SGE with the exception of the "T" which stands for turbocharged.
In the S-family of motors that were available in the U.S., there was also a 2SE used in the early Camrys. They had a different bore and stroke and single overhead cam design (no "F" or "G"). Current Camrys are using a 5SFE - externally identical to the 3SFE - except that the bore and stroke have been upped to 2.2L from 2.0L, and a pair of balance shafts were added to the lower end. Toyota's other engine families follow the same pattern. Now for a little more detail on "S" family differences.
The 2SEThe 2SE belongs to the "S"-series engine family. The 2 signifies the second revision of that group of motors. (So where is the 1S-motor? I'm assuming either it was not available in the U.S. or maybe was just a prototype that never entered production). The "E" stands for fuel injected.
The 2SE was first used in the U.S. with the introduction of the front wheel drive Camry. This was a single overhead cam 2.0L motor with bucket tappets with "hockey puck" adjusting discs. Bore and stroke were 84mm (3.307") x 90 mm (3.540"). In 1986 the Celica moved to a front wheel drive platform and it also used the 2SE motor in '86 in the ST and GT models.
The 3SFEFor 1987, the Camry and Celica base motor was changed to a square bore 86mm x 86mm and a "twin cam" head. It was still 2.0L, but the designation was now 3SFE. The 3 obviously meant the 3rd revision of the "S"-series engine family, and the "E" we know to mean EFI.
The "F" code that Toyota uses stands for twin cam or dual overhead cam, however, only one of the cams is externally driven. (Don't confuse this "F" with Toyota's F-series family straight six engine used in Landcrusiers). The 3SFE was used in Camrys from 1987-'91, and in Celicas from '87-'89.
Toyota has actually brought this motor back and it is used in the new mini-sport utility RAV4. I haven't seen any of the motors from the RAV4, so I'm really not sure what differences there are.
For now let's focus on the '87-'91 Camry/Celica version. There are some 4WD Camrys out there, Toyota called them All-Trac, and there should be some differences in the block and head. However, those vehicles should be few and far between. So other than the 4WD cars and the RAV4, the 3SFE application will pretty much fit all years.
There are a few things you should watch out for. These include the following:
•The number of flywheel bolts in the crankshaft. In 1987 there were six, and in '88 and up there were eight. There may be, however, some overlap within those two years;
•The cranks and flywheels are interchangeable. You can either have the customer visually verify the number of flywheel bolts, or you can just furnish the appropriate flywheel (automatic or manual) and not worry about the number of bolts;
•Stiffening ribs were added to the block in '89. The ribs may interfere with the larger older style oil filter. Make sure the new smaller oil filter is used if you use a newer block in an older vehicle.
The 3SGEThe Celica GTS from '86-'89 used a 3SGE motor. Still an "S"-series, it has the same bore and stroke as the 3SFE. The big difference is in the head, hence the "G" instead of the "F". The "G" is a true DOHC with both cams being externally driven, and the valves splayed outwards at a wider angle giving more of a pent-roof design to the combustion chamber. In the lower end, 3SGEs used a steel crankshaft and bushed rods along with different pistons.
The 3SGTEThere is also a 3SGTE used in the All-Trac turbo Celica ('88-'93) and MR2 turbo ('91-'95). The "T" stands for, you guessed it, turbocharged. There are some differences in the block, head, and some of the internal parts that are specific to the turbo motor.
The 5SFEThe 5SFE is a 2.2L with a bigger bore and stroke (87mm x 91mm). This motor was introduced in the Celica and MR2 in 1990 and the Camry in 1992. It was still being used in the Camry in 1997. The 5SFE added a pair of balance shafts in the oil pan driven off of the crankshaft in 1992.
That's a very quick tour of Toyota's "S" series engines. Remember the first number is the revision number of that group. The second digit (letter) is the engine family/grouping. The third digit, if an F or a G, stands for which type of OHC design.
Here's a quick rundown on what parts you can and can't interchange on the 2S and 3S engines:
CRANKSHAFTS•The 2SEs are all six-bolt. The 3SFEs are cast and may be either 6- or 8-bolt.
•The 3SGEs are steel and eight-bolt.
•The 3SGTE: I'm not sure if the turbo motor used the same crank as the non-turbo 3SGE. I think it did, but I'm not 100% sure because I haven't seen any turbo motors.
CONNECTING RODS•The 2SE and 3SFE both use the same press fit rod.
•The 3SGE and 3SGTE both use the same bushed rod.
BLOCKS•The 2SE is a block by itself. It has a unique 84 mm bore.
•The 3SFE and 3SGE blocks may be interchanged, however, be aware of the differences in the later strengthened blocks with additional ribbing.
•The 3SGTE. It would be a good idea to custom build the turbo blocks unless you know specifically more about the differences of the
VZ-FE 2.0L (78mm X 69.5mm): This 2.0L engine was used in the Japanese home market Camry/Vista models and was not available in the United States.
2VZ-FE 2.5L (87.5mm X 69.5mm): This engine was available for Camry 1988-'91 and the Lexus ES250 1990-'91. The 2VZ-FE is a 2.5L version of the "VZ" family. This motor has Toyota's twin cam per head set up, hence the "FE" designation.
North America saw this motor introduced on the FWD 1988 Toyota Camry and 1988 Lexus ES250 (which was really a dressed up Camry). Featuring four valves per cylinder; it put out 156 hp @ 5600 rpm and 160 ft.lbs. of torque @ 4400 rpm.
The design of the motor is basic Toyota from the 1980s, with cast iron block, a one-piece main bearing cradle, aluminum heads and a timing belt driving the intake camshafts, which operate bucket lifters with adjusting discs. The buckets and discs are the same ones used in Toyota's 16-valve A-, S- and M-series.
four camshafts

Sep 30, 2016 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My toyota noah refuses to revv and the fault code is p1632


Head over to this site please ~~> http://1999-toyota-noah.enginecodedb.com/p1632.html

Nov 24, 2015 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Toyota noah


loose ignition run wires at the switch, position sensors, faulty ignition switch, too many heavy items hanging from the key

Aug 27, 2014 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What is the number that is on ribs of timing belt from cam to crank on 89 camry 3sfe 2.0L


You are doing this wrong.
read the FSM for the correct way or fail,
failure can mean bent head valves or worse.
the 3sfe may be free running, id not risk it
why not log in to alldata.com and RTM
read all steps, not skipping any!!!!
getting timing right and tension is very important.

here they all are in FSM
12b gets tension right, as does the audit steps for timing
RTM its amazing how clear the FSM is .
is see the top 5 youtube posts are all wrong.
even to the point of copying the wrong timing from old belt setup.
sad. to watch.


Feb 26, 2014 | Toyota Camry Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No spark, 1988 Toyota Camry 3SFE 4cyl, 5 speed.


there is no crank sensor on this vehicles 2.0L. If you have power to the coil, new coil, cap and rotor try this if not done yet>>>Unplug coil power first....Try pulling off the distributor cap, and make sure the rotor is spinning with the cam...If this fails to spin, inspect the entire distributor assembly. If it passes, Inspect all the power circuit and wiring to the dist assembly, if ok possible ecu. i recommend having a mechanic check it out!! Hopefully this helps...please rate...thanks

Aug 11, 2009 | 1988 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

How do you replace a water pump on Toyota Camry


the pump is connected to the cam belt and is very tricky you could do a lot of damage if you set the timing wrong. when is the timing belt due for changing it would be done then or get it done now and save money incase you run out of water and blow your head gasket

Nov 21, 2008 | 1990 Toyota Camry

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