Question about 1989 Volkswagen Golf

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Is it possible to fit a 1.4 blok to a 1.8 head but the blok has 1.6 pistons in..with a 40 weber.....but I am afraid to assemble because i dnt know what else to do ......HELP!!!!!

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Can you specify the engine codes from the parts?
You probably mean 1.3 engine (1.4 didn't exists for Golf '89), with 75mm bore. In this case barely think you could fit in the pistons from 1.6 (77.4 mm bore). Also, the 1.8 head fits ok on 1.6 but on 1.3 is not possible, due to physical differences, oil channels, etc

Posted on Jan 09, 2014

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1 Answer

What is the torque settings for polo bah motor big ends :mains and cylinder head


CHECK BELOW..
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Tightening torques
Bolted connections Tightening torque
Bolts, nuts M 6 10 Nm
M 8 20 Nm
M 10 45 Nm
M 12 60 Nm
Deviating from above
Exhaust pipe to manifold 40 Nm
Installation
Note
t Only remove the new cylinder head gasket from its packing immediately before installing.
t Handle the new gasket with extreme care. Damaging will lead to leaks.
- Place a clean cloth in cylinders so that no dirt or emery cloth particles can get in between cylinder wall and piston.
- Also prevent dirt and emery cloth particles from getting into the coolant.
- Carefully clean cylinder head and cylinder block sealing surfaces. Thereby ensuring that no scoring or scratches are formed (when using abrasive paper the grade must not be less than 100).
- Carefully remove metal particles, emery remains and cloths.
- Set No. 1 cylinder piston to TDC and then turn crankshaft back slightly.
- To centralize, screw guide pins from 3450/1 into front outer holes for cylinder head bolts-flechas-.
- Place the new cylinder head gasket in the centralizing pins -A-. Lettering (Part No.) must be readable.
- Fit cylinder head, screw in 8 remaining cylinder head bolts and tighten by hand.
- Remove the guide pins with tool 3450 by the bolt holes. To do this, turn the tool left until the pins are removed.
- Fit remaining cylinder head bolts and tighten hand-tight.
- Tighten cylinder head in tightening sequence as follows:
- Tighten all bolts to 30 Nm.
- Then tighten all bolts a 1//4 turn (90 °) further using a rigid wrench.
- Then tighten all bolts again a 1/4 turn (90 °) further.
Note
There is no requirement to retighten the cylinder head bolts after repairs.
The rest of the assembly is basically a reverse of the dismantling sequence.
Note
When the camshaft is turned, the crankshaft must not be at TDC. Danger of damage to valves or piston crowns.
Installing toothed belt and adjusting valve timing > Chapter.
Filling with new coolant > Chapter.
- Interrogate fault memory > Chapter.

Feb 21, 2015 | 2006 Volkswagen Polo 1.6

1 Answer

What should I do? Get another car?


Possible bad spark plug or coil pack. Weak compression could be bent valve, worn piston rings, or head gasket. Black at the tail pipe is from unburned fuel from your cylinder miss.

Aug 19, 2014 | 2000 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

What to do when there no psi on cyl 4 to get the psi up agan"?"


There are at least three possible reasons for no psi in cyl No 4.
1. Burnt or damaged exhaust valve in that cylinder
FIX Remove head and replace faulty valve
2. Blown head gasket (water mixed with sump oil shows milky on dipstick and steam or water coming out of exhaust tailpipe, radiator water disappears )
FIX Remove head, grind flat and assemble with new gasket.
3. Broken piston rings, or cracked piston or burnt hole in piston.
FIX replace faulty parts.
Squirt some sump oil ( 2 or 3 spoonfuls ) through spark plug hole,
spin motor , and if compression PSI improves then it is rings or piston, if no PSI then it is faulty ex valve !!!

Jun 26, 2014 | 2003 Mitsubishi Lancer

1 Answer

What are the correct jets for a vw 2L 8V engine with weber 40 side drafts hi. i have a vw 2L 8V engine (stock standard) and i have a set of weber 40 side drafts on it. i please need to know what are the...


VW what car?
what year>?
no model, no year,
no joy.
are these custom carbs? if yes, NO ONE CAN answer that.
because.
Jets are tuned for YOUR engine alone.
if all this is true,then get the weber book, huh? and read it.
it tells you how to tune any weber, and its not simple. not at all
the webers are the most difficult to tune but on the other hand they are the best. (less compromise , makes great racing carbs).
there are on line weber tunning pages, why not google that.

in the old days, we'd use spark plug readings for full week end (wasted ) to tune any custom carb,,

fast forward, 21st century, we have nice wide bad 0xy sensor tool.
its about, $150 now.
we put a 02 exhaust bug on the exhaust headers, (both if v8)
and we tune the carb. using this tool , in about 1hour.
way less for only idle , idle is very simple NO ENGINE LOAD.
I set it to stoich and drive.
end story, unless , issues driving or up hills.

on stock carbs the idle has a mixture screw.
we set it to max RPM and the unscrew 1/2 turn (rich)
not all carbs some use an air screw. (backwards)
contrats, the most complex question ever asked on fixya.
ever.
join a car forum for your car, then find custom carb section
then ask there. bingo,, must maybe 1 other person did this.
but i can tell you if the engine is different , with custom exhaust
all the tuning must be done over.
eg: custom cam, milled heads, exhaust, bored cylinders. or ported inakes. all change DEMAND for fuel and must be tuned to match it.
same is true with EFI. (speed density) but not air density EFI.
see.... ?


Jun 17, 2014 | Volkswagen Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2004 mitsubishi outlander 2.4 litre how do you get the timing right again after belt broke repaired head putting back together today and need to know what to do to get all points of timing right so I


The compression stroke is relative to the head (actually the position of the valves), so TDC is all the same on the block, the lower end. Just line it up at TDC on #1.

Have you checked for bent valves or broken pistons? If the timing belt broke while it was running, and you have an interference engine, there could be damage from a piston touching a valve.
I don't know if that 2.4L engine is an interference motor. google it to find out. I don't think the position of any mark on the oil sprocket makes any difference.

May 17, 2017 | 2004 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4

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Engine diagnosis and causes for spark plugs carbon deposits


common causes of carbon deposit in spark plug:

1. blown head gasket.
2. faulty piston ring.
3. cracks/leaks in the cylinder head. this is quite serious.

possible solutions for number 3 are:
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Aug 12, 2011 | Nissan Sentra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

V.w.jetta gas eng. timing belt broke ? .shut engine off then wood not start . dealer says needs head work ? bent valves? without disasembling is it possible valves never came into contact with pistons ?


Hi, im afraid i can only give you bad news im afraid, if the engine was running even on tick over when the belt snapped then this would have caused the valves to smash into the pistons as the top half of engine would have stopped spinning leaving at least 2 valves in the out position but what causes the damage is the bottom half of the engine, as their is no weight on the cams to keep them turning they stop at once but the bottom half the crank has a big weight called the fly wheel now when the belt snapped the cams would have stopped dead but the crank would have carried on turning under its own weight and this is what causes the piston or pistons to hit the valves this then causes the valves to bend and all the valves will need replacing and the whole top end rebuilding with new seals and the new valves and valve seats will need grinding in.

how ever as its only usually the top half that gets damaged you could save yourself some time and money by calling a local breakers yard and see if they have a cylinder head lying around or even a whole engine as the cost of rebuilding you head and engine would cost more than it would to get a second hand cylinder head or if you didnt want to take any chances look into getting a whole engine.

look at the costs involved get a quote off you garage for the head rebuilt and new valves, tell them worse case if it needed complete head rebuild with all new valves and valve seats and all the seals get a price on the whole job then ask them how much it would cost if you supplied a working cylinder head or even whole engine then compare the prices and check with some breakers for cylinder head prices or engine and you should find that a second hand head will work out cheaper than having yours stripped and rebuilt with new parts.

let me know how you get on or if you need further assistance ok

please rate this solution as i have a whole page of unrated posts, thanks

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1 Answer

The engine has blown. I need to replace it or change pistons and rings. How difficult is it to change pistons and rings?


It can be time consuming and the end result may not be desirable if you haven't done it before.
--- The following is just a sample of what to do once the engine is torn down: Pistons and Connecting Rods
  1. Before installing the piston/connecting rod assembly, oil the pistons, piston rings and the cylinder walls with light engine oil. Install connecting rod bolt protectors or rubber hose onto the connecting rod bolts/studs. Also perform the following:
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  3. Install all of the rod bearing inserts into the rods and caps. Fig. 7: Most rings are marked to show which side of the ring should face up when installed to the piston tccs3222.gif

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OHV Engines CAMSHAFT, LIFTERS AND TIMING ASSEMBLY
  1. Install the camshaft.
  2. Install the lifters/followers into their bores.
  3. Install the timing gears/chain assembly.
CYLINDER HEAD(S)
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  2. Assemble the rest of the valve train (pushrods and rocker arms and/or shafts).
OHC Engines CYLINDER HEAD(S)
  1. Install the cylinder head(s) using new gaskets.
  2. Install the timing sprockets/gears and the belt/chain assemblies.
Engine Covers and Components Install the timing cover(s) and oil pan. Refer to your notes and drawings made prior to disassembly and install all of the components that were removed. Install the engine into the vehicle. Engine Start-up and Break-in STARTING THE ENGINE Now that the engine is installed and every wire and hose is properly connected, go back and double check that all coolant and vacuum hoses are connected. Check that your oil drain plug is installed and properly tightened. If not already done, install a new oil filter onto the engine. Fill the crankcase with the proper amount and grade of engine oil. Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water.
  1. Connect the vehicle battery.
  2. Start the engine. Keep your eye on your oil pressure indicator; if it does not indicate oil pressure within 10 seconds of starting, turn the vehicle OFF. WARNING
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  3. Confirm that there are no fluid leaks (oil or other).
  4. Allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature (the upper radiator hose will be hot to the touch).
  5. At this point any necessary checks or adjustments can be performed, such as ignition timing.
  6. Install any remaining components or body panels which were removed. prev.gif next.gif

Oct 17, 2010 | 1995 Ford Thunderbird

2 Answers

How do you remove the rear brake caliper on 1996 mercury grand marquis


Removal & Installation
  1. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  2. Remove the rear wheel and tire assembly.
  3. Remove the brake fitting retaining bolt from the caliper and disconnect the flexible brake hose from the caliper. Plug the hose and the caliper fitting.
  4. Remove the caliper locating pins. Lift the caliper off the rotor and anchor plate using a rotating motion.

WARNING Do NOT pry directly against the plastic piston or damage to the piston will occur.



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Rear disc brake caliper removal


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Rear disc brake caliper installation

To install:
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2 Answers

1999 nissan quest brake pad replacement


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remove 2 torx bolts that go from the inside to the outside of the vehicle. They are on the inner side of the brake caliper.
lift the caliper out of the rotor.
remove the brake pads.
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Fit the new brake pads in the calipers and slide the assembly back over the rotor.
install the 2 torx bolts, size 40? head I think.
You are done.
If rotors are scored bad, replace them too.

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