Question about 2001 Toyota Corolla

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2001(and earlier) Toyota Corolla Traction Problems

I have had 2 Toyota Corollas with 4 sets of tires, and yet every time I try to enter a highway on wet or snowy pavement the wheels spin for about 10-25 seconds, so I have to wait until there is no traffic and then ease into the road at about 5 mph to avoid this. I spoke with several other Corolla owners who have the same problem. Is there anything that can be done to avoid this?

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  • rtsk Jan 26, 2009

    I put new tires on the car in May 2004, and the problem has persisted to this day in snow, rain, or just slightly wet pavement. It also happened with my 1994 Corolla with the new set I put on after buying it used. It has nothing to do with the amount of tread on the tire. If you have to get on a highway from a complete stop, especially if you have to make a right turn from a stop sign, then the car's wheels spin for 5-20 seconds before it catches the road.

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Do you have winters on? Check how much tread is left on your tires or get somebody at a tire shop to check. My old car would do that and it was because I had barely any tread left on my tires. I just bought an older corolla and haven't had any problems with traction yet. I think it has fairly new blizzak winters on it.

Posted on Jan 19, 2009

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1 Answer

When I select 4 wheel drive, why does it feel as though it is binding or dragging and whining while driving?


Depending on the specific vehicle many 4WD have a transfer case that will lock the front and rear drives shafts together. This configuration is only for slippery conditions like ice and snow or very wet or off road. When turning the radius is different between the front and rear so there is a lot of feedback to the steering wheel. This is created by the fact the front set of wheels and the rear set of wheels must make the same number of turns because of the locked transfer case.

If you attempt to drive on high friction surfaces the stress to the drive train is excessive and will cause damage. The whine and the bunny hop is the drive train attempting to release this tension. If you were on a slippery surface the tires would have much less resistance turning at slightly different rates.

Also critical is the tire size need to be the same. However even with perfectly matched tires the problem on dry surfaces remain the same.

The AWD vehicles are equipped with a third differential that allows for the difference between the rotation of the drive shafts so it can drive on dry pavement no problem. Some configurations allow the AWD to have the transfer case locked which falls into the first category where dry pavement is prohibited.

Some Jeeps have a viscous coupling in the transfer case that permits limited slip between front to rear but the resistance to slip increases as the deference increases as in the event one tire is slipping
These Jeeps still have the lock up option in the transfer case requiring dry pavement when engaged.

Hope this helps?
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Jan 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2003 cadillac cts stability control and traction control


Get your system checked for malfunction codes. Sounds like there is water entering the sensor harnesses under the vehicle. Doesn't take much to set off the malfunction light.

Aug 24, 2015 | 2003 Cadillac CTS

2 Answers

Are there damage to any 4wheel drive components shifting from 4wheeldrive setting still with transmission is indrive


Most 4WD systems are designed to be shifted in and out "on the fly". It is less stressful for the drive train doing it while in park however. 4WD does not like cornering - especially on "grippy" surfaces such as dry asphalt (why would you need 4WD on dry asphalt, anyway?). Dry asphalt is really tough on 4WD as the the tires may have minute differences in circumference as a result of wear and since all are spinning at the exact speed (even going straight ahead), those difference add up and strain the drive train. Slippery surfaces allow the tires to slip away those differences as soon as they begin to appear. Even wet pavement allows this to happen, tho not as easily as grass, dirt, snow or ice.

Drive in a tight, complete circle on dirt and you'll see that there's a shorter path of tracks for the inside tires than those on the outside. Yet, the 4WD locks all wheels to turn the same amount. The jerking during the cornering that you're feeling is the inside tires trying to spin to "catch up" to turning at the same rate as the outer tires. See the video linked below.

Check your manual and you'll likely be cautioned against running 4WD on dry pavement for these reasons.


Mar 03, 2015 | 2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Why does my 4 wheel drive not work all the time?


Elaine,

not work, do tell what makes you think it dont work (a lamp) or tires slipping or dead tires. (by tires mean that and traction)??????????

what mode fails, of the many, and where.???????



first off, we dont know what your tires are touching.

on road, or off road. pavement or ICE or snow.

that matters big time . (you read manual and match MODE to Road)

your lost operators guide explains all that, right?

eg: how and when to use, 4wd, its all there. I promise.

ControlTrac 4-wheel-drive system



here are the mode. which one , gives you problems.



quote ford with comments.



What are the modes, and how do they differ?

(note this is the operational behavior of a 2008 Ford Expedition. Newer and older Expeditions will vary only slightly)



2H 2-wheel-drive with high range gearing (1.00:1) Rear-wheel-drive capability,

2-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4A 4-wheel-drive Auto with high range gearing (1.00:1) Full-time all-wheel-drive capability, ((best on pavement or any time)

Electronically adjusted torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically variable center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft allowed rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4H 4-wheel-drive with high range gearing (1.00:1) Part-time 4-wheel-drive capability, (not for dry pavement EVER)

Continuous 50/50 torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically locked center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft mechanically locked with no rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled



4L 4-wheel-drive with low range gearing (2.64:1) Part-time 4-wheel-drive capability, (off road usage, mostly)

Continuous 50/50 torque split to front & rear wheels, Electronically locked center differential,

Front driveshaft & rear primary driveshaft mechanically locked with no rotational speed difference,

4-wheel electronic traction control system is enabled, ESC and RSC are disabled



In 4A mode the center differential is electronically-controlled and rear drive wheel bias. The on-board computer monitors for any sign of rear drive wheel slip (loss of traction)

If loss of traction is detected, the center differential is told to send a share of the engine\'s torque to the front drive wheels. It will not let the front driveshaft turn at the same speed as the rear driveshaft.



What about traction management?

1997-2002 model Ford Expeditions offered an optional limited-slip rear differential (LSD). A conventional open rear differential was standard along with the conventional open front differential and the electronic locking center differential.

comment with out LSD, one tire can spin, on say ice.

but the other 3 tires dont, in full time.

Jul 04, 2014 | 2003 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

How do i check the front axle vacuum selonoid on a 2002 jeep wrangler


02 , just sold mine, best car ever. had, of many.

how do you know that.?

and what are the tires, touching, (dirt, snow,ice, grass , pavement)

what?

this car has part time 4wd, it is not AWD

its not a Grand cheerokee with AWD.

engaging 4wd on ice free pavement is wrong.

http://www.rubicon-trail.com/4WD101/driveline-bind.html



and my fsm states.

read the operators guide in the glove box, it will say....

"2WD is intended to be driven on normal street and highway conditions, such as HARD surfaced roads."

Then

"4H & 4L positions are intended for loose slippery road surfaces only and not intended for normal driving" (They assume paved streets are normal.)

"Driving in 4H or 4L positions on hard surfaces roads, will cause, increased tire wear, and damage to the drive line components."

Unqual tire sizes, will do the same damage. "circumference mismatched"

Last: "do not attmpet to make a shift, while only the front or rear wheels are spinning" No transfer case synchronizer exists and damage will result."
(kill the gear dogs, you will)

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1 Answer

When my car is stuck in the snow and doesnt seem to get traction only one wheel spins and not the other and its front wheel drive wouldnt both spin?


No, even a 4x4 will have only 1 wheel that will spin on each axle in this instance. It's called a floating differential. For stock vehicles with non locking differentials like you have, both cannot spin or have full power at the same time. Hard to explain on this, but picture your car making a hard right turn. Both front wheels would be spinning at different speeds because of the turn. The passenger side tire is spinning much slower than the drivers side tire, therefore if both were spinning at the same time, your tires would chirp and skip on the pavement which would eventually ruin your differential. In offroad applications, we WANT the differentials locked and turning at the same time with true 4x4. But in normal everyday vehicles, even standard stock 4x4's, only 1 tire will do the spinning per axle unless it has possitraction or full locked axle. Clear as snow?

Mar 13, 2014 | Ford Taurus Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Wheel hop rear wheels


you have bad shocks-and- or tires that need replaced-while car is setting try to push down on the rear and see if it goes down easily and then bounces when released-jack rear end up-try to spin tires and see if they spin freely-check tires for cupping or funny wear patterns-you also may have brake shoe that are coming apart and locking a wheel up without putting on the brakes-so lots of options here-hope you get it solved-cheers Denny

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2 Answers

Front wheels making growling noise and try to lock up when put in four wheel drive


first question we ask is this. are all 4 tires the same diameter??? if two are newer than the other two it will do as you describe. also if you are trying to drive it in 4 wheel on dry pavement dont. youll break things to dont want to know about and they are expensive.

Feb 01, 2018 | Chevrolet Silverado Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2005 Kia Sorento - in 4 wheel drive, on dry pavement, going slow in forward, turning a corner to the left the rear drivers side wheel tries going in reverse and when turning right the passenger side wheel...


Hi,
Yes, this is normal while in four wheel drive on pavement.
I will try and explain why.
In four wheel drive the front and rear drive axles are linked together by a chain in the transfer case and gears in both axles. This is a direct link with very little play between the front and rear axles.
When cornering a rear wheel will spin faster, or slower depending on the direction of the turn. this causes a binding in the drive line because the drive line wants all the wheels to turn at the same speed. So the wheel "skipping" going in reverse, is the drive lines way of compensating for the different speed of the wheels turning.
Never should a four wheel drive be used on dry pavement. I could cause a break in one of the drive line components. On a slippery surface , snow, mud, gravel, grass, There is enough slippage in the surface to aloow the driveline to compensate for the different speeds of tire rotation.
So do not try at highway speeds on dry pavement.
Your four wheel drive system is working just fine.
Wayne

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1 Answer

How do I know if my 2004 Rav4 has 4 wheel drive


check under the front and rear see if it has a transfer case with a drive line going to the front and rear. If there is no 4/4 button it would be full time 4 wheel drive. you can also check by jacking up the front and rear to see if the tires spin, If it was snowy out someone can stand outside the car and see if tires are spinning.

Feb 16, 2010 | 2004 Toyota RAV4

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