Question about 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

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How often should ignition coil be replaced?

2.0 engine,i don t have problems with coils ,just wondering what is the maintenance time.thanks

Posted by Anonymous on

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  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: 2003 galant engine light - check coil

unplug coil 2 and inspect the spark plug.

Posted on Jul 23, 2008

  • 7 Answers

SOURCE: Re:1.8 gsr Turbo ignition coil problem

when you replace your ignition coil is it the right one spec from factory? Also when ever you replace a coil it is good practice to replace leads and spark plugs at the same time and test rotor and cap as these parts if worn or damaged will put your coil under extra load making its life shorter.

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: one coil won't fire

I have a 95 montero 3.0 with the same problem. no spark on coil #3 Replaced ecm and crank sensor
Did you ever get this problem fixed ?
Any ideas? Thanks,
Dave

Posted on Jun 23, 2009

  • 750 Answers

SOURCE: 1995 montero 3.0 no spark on coil #3

check the jack pins condition, check for brakes, check the harnhes for broken wires, try an other ecm from a junked or salvage or borrowed and see if it makes any difference

Posted on Jul 12, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: My car does not start. I changed the ignition

Check to see If you have power to ignition module,coil a good wiring schematic is needed to properly check you power supply to computer .factory repair manuals are availible on eBay about 10 bucks .computer is high failure item on these.

Posted on Nov 01, 2009

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2 Answers

The 3 and 6 is not fireing on coil pack


POSIBLE CAUSE O YOU NEED A NEW COIL PACK OR A IGNITION MODULE

Sep 02, 2014 | 2000 Buick LeSabre

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Spark plug and ignition coil problems.... plugged cat?


romove poping plug start engine if thier is major air pressure coming outyou have ahole in your piston replace piston overhaule kitand new piston possible thred damage on head,replace cat,and get a dog:) good luck.

Feb 22, 2013 | 1998 Ford Expedition

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98 mercury villager no start , code P 1320


Here is the entire description for the code -

When is the code detected?When the ignition signal in the primary circuit is not sent to Engine Control Module (ECM) during engine cranking or running.

Symptoms- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)

P1320 NISSAN Description The ignition signal from the Engine Control Module (ECM) is sent to and amplified by the power transistor. The power transistor turns on and off the ignition coil primary circuit. This on-off operation induces the proper high voltage in the coil secondary circuit
Possible causes - Faulty power transistor unit built into ignition coil
- Ignition primary circuit is open or shorted (circuit to ignition coils)
- Ignition primary circuit poor electrical connection (circuit to ignition coils)
- Faulty ignition system condenser
- Crankshaft position sensor circuit

help.png Help with this Tech notes The most common cause that will trigger the P1320 code is the ignition coils, one or more ignition coils may have failed. Even tough the coils may be working OK, the resistance for one or more of the coils is greater or smaller that what the Engine Control Module (ECM) is expecting. Measuring the resistance with the coil out of the vehicle may not show any failures, usually the coil fails under heavy conditions (hard acceleration) or certain temperatures.

The P1320 code means that there is problem with the "Ignition Coil" or the wire to the ignition coil. For some models without individual ignition coils the Ignition Coil is inside the distributor and the distributor need to be replaced to fix the problem.
Read more: http://engine-codes.com/p1320_nissan.html#ixzz2EJsrz4BZ

Read more: http://engine-codes.com/p1320_nissan.html#ixzz2EJsktmXX

Dec 06, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Miss fireing


Hi there:

P0351 Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
and
P0352 Ignition Coil B Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction

and
P0354 Ignition Coil D Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction


Work for all coil codes. The COP (coil on plug) ignition system is what is used on most modern engines. There is an individual coil for each cylinder that is controlled by the PCM (powertrain control module). It eliminates the need for spark plug wires by putting the coil right above the sparkplug. Two wires are dedicated to each coil. One is a battery feed usually from the power distribution center. The other wire is the coil driver circuit from the PCM. The PCM grounds/ungrounds this circuit to activate or deactivate the coil. The coil driver circuit is monitored by the PCM for faults



If an open or a short is detected in the driver circuit for coil number 1, a P0351 may set. Also, depending on the vehicle, the PCM may also shut down the fuel injector to the cylinder also.


Symptoms of a P0351 P0352 and P0354 DTC may include:
MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination
Engine misfire may be present or intermittent

Potential causes of a P0351 , P0352 and P0354 code include:
Short to voltage or ground on COP driver circuit
Open on COP driver circuit
Loose connection at coil or broken connector locks
Bad Coil (COP)
Faulty Powertrain Control Module


Possible Solutions:
Is the engine misfiring presently? If not, the problem is likely intermittent. Try wiggle testing the wiring at the #1 coil and along the wiring harness to the PCM. If manipulating the wiring causes the misfire to surface, repair the wiring problem. Check for poor connection at the coil connector. Verify the harness isn't misrouted or chafing on anything. Repair as necessary


If the engine is misfiring presently, stop the engine and disconnect the #1 coil wiring connector. Then start the engine and check for a driver signal to the #1 coil or #2. Using a scope will give you a visual pattern to observe, but since most people don't have access to one there's an easier way. Use a Voltmeter in AC Hertz scale and see if there's a Hz reading of between 5 and 20 or so that indicates the driver is working. If there is a Hertz signal, then replace the #1 ignition coil. It's likely bad. If you don't detect any frequency signal from the PCM on the ignition coil driver circuit indicating the PCM is grounding/ungrounding the circuit (or there is no visible pattern on the scope if you have one) then leave the coil disconnected and check for DC voltage on the driver circuit at the ignition coil connector. If there is any significant voltage on that wire then there is a short to voltage somewhere. Find the short and repair it.


If there is no voltage on the driver circuit, then turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM connector and check the continuity of the driver between the PCM and the coil. If there is no continuity repair the open or short to ground in the circuit. If continuity is present, then check for resistance between ground and the ignition coil connector. There should be infinite resistance. If there isn't, repair the short to ground in the coil driver circuit


NOTE: If the ignition coil driver signal wire is not open or shorted to voltage or ground and there is no trigger signal to the coil then suspect a faulty PCM coil driver. Also keep in mind that if the PCM driver is at fault, there may be a wiring problem that caused the PCM failure. It's a good idea to do the above check after PCM replacement to verify there won't be a repeat failure. If you find that the engine isn't misfiring, the coil is being triggered properly but P0351 is continually being reset, there is the possibility that the PCM coil monitoring system may be faulty.


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Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Aug 07, 2012 | 2004 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

I have a 2004 Toyota Vios Soluna. It has 130,000kms and I am wondering if and when I am supposed to change the timing belt? thanks for your help, steve


If it's not specified in the owner manual, and if it's not already been replaced, 90,000 miles (144,000km) is probably the longest you should wait before replacing it.

Mar 22, 2011 | Toyota Passenger Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Onley firin on 2 clynders


I would check the injectors for each cylinder, and check for spark in each cylinder.

If the injectors are not firing in all cylinders, it may be a computer.

If spark occurs in some but not all cylinders, it could be an ignition coil.

DISTRIBUTORLESS IGNITION SYSTEM General Information A distributorless ignition system is used on all 2.2L and 2.5L models. The system consists of a cam and crankshaft angle sensor, knock sensor, two ignition coils, an Electronic Control Unit (ECU) and assorted sensors. The system control features a quick response learning control method that compares data stored in the ECU memory to data received from the sensors. Thus, the ECU constantly provides the optimum ignition timing in relation to output, fuel consumption, exhaust gas and other variables. The ECU receives signals from the airflow sensor, water temperature sensor, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, knock sensor and other various indicators to judge the operating condition of the engine. It then selects the optimum ignition timing stored in the memory and immediately transmits a primary current OFF signal to the igniter to control the ignition timing. The ECU also receives signals emitted from the knock sensor. Ignition timing is controlled so that advanced ignition timing is maintained immediately before engine knock occurs. Two ignition coils are used, one for the No. 1 and No. 2 cylinders, and one for the No. 3 and No. 4 cylinders. A simultaneous ignition type is employed for each bank of cylinders. This eliminates the distributor and achieves maintenance free operation. Ignition control under normal conditions is performed by the ECU measuring engine revolutions. Using the data it receives, the ECU decides the ignition timing according to engine operation. Ignition control under starting conditions is set by the ECU at 10°BTDC. prev.gif next.gif

Sep 02, 2010 | 1995 Subaru Impreza

1 Answer

2001 dodge ram 1500 5.8l ignition coil going bad


Just go buy new coil its two screws and one wire problem done!

Mar 27, 2009 | 2001 Dodge Ram 1500 Truck 2WD

1 Answer

Re:1.8 gsr Turbo ignition coil problem


when you replace your ignition coil is it the right one spec from factory? Also when ever you replace a coil it is good practice to replace leads and spark plugs at the same time and test rotor and cap as these parts if worn or damaged will put your coil under extra load making its life shorter.

Jul 20, 2008 | 2002 Mitsubishi Lancer

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