Question about 1998 Volkswagen Jetta

11 Answers

GLOW PLUGS DO NOT WORK on 1998 jetta tdi

I replaced glowplugs. relay,fuses and temperature sensor,but glow plug lite will flash for one second and will work if I disconnect the plug from the temperatue sensor

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  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    With respect to your answer which was not satisfactory I switched the temperature sensor from one vehicle to another and it worked on the previous one but will not work on the vehicle in question

  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    It would be unsusual for 5 different temperature sensors to be defective.

  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    I checked the glow plug harness and I get power at the connectors all 4 with the temperature sensor un plugged

  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    I did replace the temperature sensor with new ones I had in stock.I did this after your last answer to replace it, same results, light will stay on for a second only

  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    As I had indicated earlier I did replace the 2 fuses one on the fire wall and one on the fuse/ relay panel

  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    I think we are talking about two different cars the 99.5 and up had the fuses on top of the battery, this car is a 1998 tdi old style body that is the subjest of discussion

  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    Could someoneexplain where the glow plug control module is situated on the 1998 vw jetta tdi also can someone send a diagram of the fuse/relay panel

  • burgemik Jan 17, 2009

    Could someone explain where the glow plug control module is situated on the 1998 vw jetta tdi also can someone send a diagram of the fuse/relay panel

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11 Answers

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  • Master
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If the resistance reading is nominal at the sender, check it under the dash at the glow plug relay socket. This signal is present at the connector labeled "T", read resistance from there to ground. If you get a different value than you read at the sensor, there is a problem in the wiring or the connector itself.

If you need more info, this is a perfect site with all the info you need. Copy and paste in browser;
http://www.4crawler.com/Diesel/CheapTricks/GlowPlugs.shtml#TemperatureSensor

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

  • 1 more comment 
  • Nate Stansfield
    Nate Stansfield Jan 17, 2009

    I was wondering if you got any engine codes with this problem. The dealership can updated your cars computer software also. I've read that some sensor can be to sensitive and they need an update.


  • Nate Stansfield
    Nate Stansfield Jan 24, 2009

    The North American market 1998 A3 has the "180" glow plug relay
    attached above the main relay block. The glow plug fuse is mounted just
    above the glow plug relay, not separately on the inner firewall as on
    the B4. Also note in the image below that there is nothing in the lower
    right relay socket (location #12). This is a difference from the 97 B4
    TDI which needs a jumper to feed power to the glow relay 180.

    Note: The installation of a #12 jumper relay from a 1997 B4, or the
    installation of a "103" or "180" glow plug relay in this vacant
    position with the 1998 A3 wiring harness can also cause damage to
    electrical components and possibly fire from dead shorts.


    In the 98 A3 the socket #12 is empty. The glow plug fuse is before the
    glow plug relay. The fuse is always hot. Again there is no easily
    accessed test point for either.



  • Nate Stansfield
    Nate Stansfield Jan 24, 2009








    Hello – Denise





    I have attached the info on the fuses.





    Also, if you need more info please indicate your engine by
    liter….1.8L, 1.9L, or 2.0. Also is the model a GL, GLS, GLX, GT or
    TDI.





    As for the alarm…I would prefer to have the above info first to make sure I had the correct vehicle to review.




    If I may ask, what is the reason you want to disconnect the alarm
    system?? Is it not working correctly…..something we may be able to
    assist with fixing?





    Thanks for the donation





    Please let us know if what the final fix was for your car so we can better assist others. Thanks!





    Find a car repair manual for your car repair questions.














    Fuse locations for options not shown can be found in the corresponding wiring diagrams.


    Amp.








    1 - Headlight, Low Beam, Left (56b) 10


    2 - Headlight, Low Beam, Right (56b) 10


    3 - License Plate Lights (5 10


    4 - Rear Window Wiper And Washer System 15


    5 - Windshield Wiper/Washer 15


    6 - Fresh Air Blower, A/C (X) 20


    7 - Tail Lights, Right (58R) 10


    8 - Tail Lights, Left (58L) 10


    9 - Rear Window Defogger 20


    10 - Fog Lights 15


    11 - Headlight, High Beam, Left (56a) 10


    12 - Headlight, High Beam, Right (56a) 10


    13 - Horn (15) 10


    14 - Back-Up Lights 10


    15 - Engine Electronics (15) 10


    16 - Power Sunroof, Front Map/Reading Light 15


    17 - Emergency Flashers (15) 10


    18 - Fuel Pump (FP), Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S)


    Control Module 20


    19 - Coolant Fan, A/C Relay (30) 30


    20 - Brake Lights (30) 10


    21 - Interior Lights, Clock, Luggage Compartment


    Light (30) 15


    22 - Cigarette Lighter, Radio, Luggage Compartment


    Release 10





    Separate Fuses





    (Located above the relays)











    - Fuse for ABS hydraulic pump relay 30


    - Fuse for ABS main relay 30


    - Fuse for A/C 30


    - Fuse for power windows 20


    - Fuse for cruise control 5


    - Fuse for cigarette lighter 15





    In the engine compartment above the brake booster:








    - Glow plugs 50





    Note: The Glow plug fuse should be changed by your authorized Volkswagen dealer only.


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Hey I have a 1998 jetta tdi and I cant seem to find the starter relay some help plz

Posted on Nov 26, 2014

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  • Master
  • 1,596 Answers

With Your Email Address I can Send you ANY & ALL Technical Info / Diagrams To Your GLO-PLUG
System, What I Have is too Larg to send through "FixYa's" little Channels

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

  • Ronnie Wilson Jan 17, 2009

    RE: Diagrms / INFO My E mail Is the nickname here @aol.com

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  • 199 Answers

Pull the harness off. turn the hand toward the engine and put the fingers under the harness and pull up gently. On the glow plug their is a place to insert an open end wrench. It's about 10 millimeters, Turn to the left. That is about all their is to it.
---------------
Glow plug shorted to ground causing the internal fuse of the glow plug control module to burn out. Replace the shorted glow plug as well as the glow plug control module. The following test procedure should be used to identify the shorted glow plug: Disconnect the 6-pin output connector of the glow plug control module. Use a 12 gauge wire and a 15 Amp in-line fuse to connect the positive side of the battery with one pin of the connector going to the glow plug. If the fuse burns out within 10 seconds, the glow plug is shorted and must be replaced. Repeat that procedure for every pin going to each glow plug. It is necessary to check each of the glow plugs for being shorted. If this is not done, the shorted glow plug will damage the new glow plug control module.
----------------
for how to check out the glow plug wiring just click this link and read the instructions with diagrams and follow the steps properly
http://vincewaldon.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=30&Itemid=28

thanks.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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  • Master
  • 6,966 Answers

Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Would it have a Glow plug Control Module? If yes and it is faulty, that would explain why "power at the connectors... temperature sensor un plugged".

Good luck and Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

  • Louie  Role
    Louie Role Jan 18, 2009

    My apologies for not being more specific. The wiring, the modules and the general electrical layout of most Jetta TDIs would be specific to:


    • country of origin/manufacture;

    • region of intended use.
    That beings said, then possibilities for your Jetta would be:


    • Glow plug Control Module, in the windshield wiper motor area, made by Bosch;

    • part of the ECU.
    As VW only made a comeback in my country mid 2000, earlier models are rather rare. On models that has the Glow plug Control Module integrated with the ECU, most mechs (at least here) simply hardwire a manual switch to override the relay and switch the glow plugs longer (as to one's preference). This is due to ECU cost and availability. Some enterprising mechs incorporate an electronic time delay. Again, since most early models were purchased in the gray market, tech support is non-existent and the modifications to the wiring have to be "winged".

    Here is an example of a modification that might interest you.

    Cheers.


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  • Master
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Hi!
The glow plug relay is not powered directly by the ignition switch. Power comes from fuse S176 on top of the battery for the glow plugs. The coil of the relay is powered from relay 109 and switched by the ECU. However, it is safe to say that the ignition switch is not intended to power the glow plugs, the relay contacts are supposed to carry the load. The ignition switch might power the relay coil, but that load is less than 0.2 amps--very low.

Some of the relays in the VW can be plugged in up-side-down. In other words there is nothing to orient the relay contacts to the socket in which it is plugged into. Can you be certain that you are not orienting the relay incorrectly.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

  • Rylee Smith
    Rylee Smith Jan 17, 2009

    Hi



    Check the amp draw on each individual glow plug. A normal glow plug will show a draw of about 9 amps (On initial application of power, the amp draw will spike high until the glow plug begins to heat. A typical spike can run as high as 19 amps).

    Check the glow plug wiring and connections for damage, looseness or corrosion.

    A difference in amperage draw of 3 amps between glow plugs can cause a code P0380 to set. Be sure that all glow plugs are within 3 amps of each other on initial application of power and also during normal glow period.

    If glow plugs fail testing, always replace them as a set.

    If you have further questions please post back

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Check the fuses if they are blown out this can be the problem.Follow the glow plug supply wire from the engine to the firewall. The small box mounted there has the fuse mounted under the cover. replace the fuse if seems to be faulty.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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  • 108 Answers

And again, defective temp sensor. Not uncommon occurance.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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A panel just above the gas and brake pedals needs to be removed. Follow your steering wheel down. There are about 3 torque-head screws that hold it on. When the panel is off, you must look up inside. I believe the glow plug relay is (150). There is also a (109) relay that make give you problems down the road, consider changing this also. The 150 relay tends to be a expensive. Before you replace it, make sure your glow plug harness is not to blame.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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  • Master
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Welcome to Fixya! You have gotten a bad Temp. Sensor. It is not unusual for this to happen. Replace it with another one and it will work.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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The new temperature sensor would appear to be defective

Robert

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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  • Roberta Smith
    Roberta Smith Jan 17, 2009

    Have you checked the fusable link located about dead center on the firewall ?



    Robert

  • Roberta Smith
    Roberta Smith Jan 17, 2009

    further this... there are two sensors on the heater outlet... are you changing the one with the blue/white wire ?



    Robert

  • Roberta Smith
    Roberta Smith Jan 17, 2009

    Do all of the glow plugs heat up... one may be bad

    also check the relay for corrosion and that the pins inside the fuse box haven't pushed in... easliy done by checking for signal to the relay...

  • Roberta Smith
    Roberta Smith Jan 17, 2009

    And one more thing to try... unconnect the temperature sender lead and leave unconnected... turn on the key and wait about 7 to 10 seconds... try and start the motor



    Robert

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1 Answer

Colt diesel takes a long time to start. glow plugs and battery are new. some one suggested glowplug relays or the black box. what can i do to check if its any of the two or what do you recommend i do


if the ignition controls the amount of time glow plugs are on for flick the ignition off and on 3-5 times each time letting the glow plug symbol glow untill it turns off then try starting. if its still slow to fire your glow plugs are not working at all. start by backtracing the glow plugs from the adjoining bar back to wherever it comes from for breaks, then replace your glow plug relay in the fuse box usually.

if its manual glowing just glow it for 10-12 seconds and try.if its not firing then the glows arent getting the power they need

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MY 93 FORD 350 7.3 I PUT SWITCH ON AND START CLICKING RIGHT AWAY BEFORE WILL TAKE FEW MINUTES SEEMS LIKE T GLOW PLUG IS NOT WORKING RIGHT IF I PLUG THE ENGINE WILL START WITH NO PROBLEM ,SOME PEOPLE


This is not to hard to solve. The outside airtemp determines how long the Glowplug timer works for absolute cold starts. Starting a warm engine is affected by underhood temps.

The Timer Relay will pulse power to the glowplugs. If the glowplugs are good, it is enough to preheat the cylinder for firing.

To tell if a glowplug is good is a matter of comparision between a new glowplug and a worn glowplug. YOU CAN MELT A GLOWPLUG WITH THIS TEST, but you remove the glowplugs, get a set of battery jumper cables and place one jumper to the base of the glowplug USING CARE not to ruin the threads on the glowplug.

You do not want to arc the spark on the glowplug threads. You want your fixed jumper connector locked on the base of the glowplug. The other battery cable jumper is touched to the top of the glowplug where the arcing occurs. This will not hurt the contact point if done properly.

You compare the "glow" of the old glowplug to the "glow" of the new glowplug. Bad glowplugs stay dark or operate at a darker color.

The Timer Relay gives you pulses and that is all the glowplugs get to heat up. This is what you simulate in your test. If a glowplug operates in a dull or dark condition, it is bad and throw it away. You want all glowplugs to readily light up when power is applied.

The other 2 parts to the system are the Timer Relay and the Power Relay. The timer gets its power from the Power Relay and the Power Relay is like a starter solenoid. The Power relay gets a tickler charge when the keyswitch is held to Start.

There are sometimes extreme cold Timers that hold the power longer tothe glowplugs. I do not have the Specs to tell you if your Timer is kicking out to soon.

I hope my solution helps. I have told you how to test your glowplugs. The timers are affected by air temperature and that makes it difficult to say if it is working long enough. If you know the glowplugs are good, and the timer shuts off before the glowplugs heat up, then you need a new or different type of timer.

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1 Answer

How to change glow plugs


Quick lesson Diesel 101, repair only what is broken. There is no reason to replace glowplugs if they work. There are other things that make the glowplugs work or fail to work.

You should be able to follow the wires from the glowplugs up to a box or module. This module is a timer. Its job is to vary the length of time the glowplugs work depending on atmospheric temperature and engine temperature. Then follow the wires from the timer module to a power relay. This part receives the signal from the ignition switch and transfers high power to the timer module.

Only when these are checked, should you blame the glowplugs. For glowplug testing you take them out and use battery jumper cables. You hook one terminal to the base and avoid crushing the threads. You then touch the other battery cable to the top of the glowplug. You can melt them, so do not overdo it.

When you find the brightest, that is your benchmark. Bad glow plugs only have as long as the timer allows for them to glow. Replace the darker ones, use the brighter ones.

Other than that point, glowplugs have no adjustment and come out like regular sparkplugs.

I hope this was helpful.

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1 Answer

Glowplugs dont work


check glow plug fuse, glow plug relay, glow plug switch, or replace glow plug.

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1 Answer

1987 Ford f-250 6.9 liter diesel. Glow plugs are good, Relay is new, glow plugs don't work... is there a glow plug relay controller or timer that can be replaced, and what is the part's proper name?


Check for fuses first. The Glowplug timer is the proper name for the part that responds to Temperature when starting your engine. When the engine is cold, of course it is on longer and can cycle making a click and intermittently dimming the lights on your truck. When the engine is warm, your gowplugs may not even fire as the engine is using compression alone to fire up.

Also, Ford did make a Severe Weather model that kept the glowplugs on longer. If you stay in Alaska or a climate with consistent subzero temperatures you may need it.

Nov 16, 2010 | 1987 Ford F 250

2 Answers

Glow plugs stopped working on a pajero 2.8td 1994 model, plugs and buzz bar are ok.


My glow rail would come on for a very short time, then turn off (less than 1 second).
Replaced the control wire for the glow relay, with a test lead from battery to relay control terminal - relay was working fine (relay is between batteries).

Checked the engine temperature sensor (located on top of the housing where the top radiator hose attaches to the engine).
Take out and test in a pot of water (need a 19mm deep socket to remove).
At 0 deg C should be 8.6K ohms
At 20 deg C should be 3.25K ohms
At 40 deg C should be 1.5 K ohms
At 80 deg C should be 300 ohms
I replaced the temperature sensor with a 8.2K ohm resistor (engine cold).
Then tried with a 1.2K ohm resistor (engine hot).
Each time I tested the glow rail at the relay (with a multimeter) it would turn off after about 12-14 seconds, which is normal, to protect the glow plugs and battery drain (they come on again when engine is starting).

When I put the temperature sensor back in, the glow rail was working fine again - only thing I can think of is that the contact between the sensor and the plug, may have had a oxide formed and caused a high resistance or open circuit, indicating to the glow controller that the engine was hot and did not need glow activation.
So try taking the plug off the temperature sensor, and reattaching it again it might be all it needs, to clean its contacts.

Feb 01, 2010 | 1994 Mitsubishi Montero

1 Answer

No power to glow plugs...relay replaced...still no power...jumped 12 v to glow plug side of relay and glow plugs then energize. Can ignition be at fault?(1999 jetta alh)


There is a big fuse in the engine room for the glowplugs.
You'll find it just near the brake vacuum cilinder under a black cap...
Hear if the glow relay ticks when you'll put power on. Does the glow light lights on?

Oct 30, 2009 | 1999 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

Glow plugs causing starting problem


if you need connectors and terminals for the glow plug connections under the valve cover, Ford sells then so you don't need a whole $600 harness.

info for your use

Section 03-07B: Glow Plug System 1996 F-250, F-350, F-Super Duty Equipped with 7.3L Diesel Engines Workshop Manual
DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION Glow Plug System The 7.3L diesel engine uses a glow plug system which preheats air in the combustion chamber to improve cold engine starting. The system consists of eight glow plugs, the glow plug control module (12B533), powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650), engine oil temperature (EOT) sensor and barometric pressure sensor (BARO sensor) (12A644). The glow plug system is electronically controlled by the powertrain control module. The powertrain control module energizes the glow plugs immediately after the key is placed in the ON position and then determines how long the glow plugs will be on according to the engine oil temperature and the barometric pressure. The required time for the glow plugs to be energized decreases as the engine oil temperature and barometric pressure increase. The glow plugs are self-regulating, and the powertrain control module controls relay ON time. The powertrain control module protects the glow plugs by energizing them for short durations if the battery voltage is abnormally high.

Possible Causes: Insufficient glow plug ON time will not allow enough heat to accumulate in the combustion chamber to easily facilitate starting. If the glow plug system ON time does not meet any of the specifications in the accompanying chart the problem is most likely a faulty wire harness connection, ground connections or glow plug relay.

If the glow plug resistance to ground is high, the most likely causes are an open UVC (under valve cover) harness or open glow plug.
--------------------------------------------------------
Relay Operation
Install a DVOM on the glow plug feed side of the glow plug relay (large stud with two wires connected). Turn the ignition key to the ON position but do not attempt to start. Note the time in seconds from when the key is turned on and the glow plug relay energizes until the glow plug relay de-energizes. The glow plug relay makes a loud click noise which is easily heard when it energizes and de-energizes. The dome light will dim and the dash voltmeter will dip when the glow plugs are drawing current from the battery. Compare the times measured to the table (time will be affected by engine temperature, battery condition and vehicle altitude). The voltage at the glow plug feed terminal may vary from 9 to 12 volts depending upon battery condition.
--------------------------------------

-----
If battery voltage not present check for B+ at power supply terminal (terminal with single large wire). Power for glow plug power supply is supplied from starter relay through two fusible links at solenoid.
Glow Plug Operation
Disconnect all of the glow plug/injector harness connectors from the valve cover gaskets. With the pigtail installed, measure glow plug resistance to ground (preferably B-). A resistance measurement of .1 to 6 ohms indicates a good glow plug.



Glow Plug Harness Continuity
Measure for continuity from the connector harness to the glow plug feed terminal on the glow plug relay. Resistance should be less than 5 ohms.
Incorrect measurements will result if all glow plug/injector connectors to valve cover are not disconnected.

---------------------------------------------------
Glow Plug Relay The glow plug relay (12A343) has a plastic base and two mounting bolts. It is operated by the powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) which senses engine oil temperature, PCM voltage and barometric pressure. When the engine oil temperature or the barometric pressure is low, the PCM activates the glow plug relay and the glow plugs. If the PCM voltage is too high, the powertrain control module deactivates the glow plug relay and the glow plugs immediately energize for a shorter duration, decreasing the modulation of the duty cycle.
-----------------------------------------------
Glow Plug Removal
  1. stj~us~en~file=ani_caut.gif~gen~ref.gif WARNING: THE RED-STRIPED WIRING HARNESS CARRIES 115V DC. SEVERE ELECTRICAL SHOCK MAY BE RECEIVED. DO NOT PIERCE.
    Remove valve cover (6582). Refer to Section 03-01D .
  1. Disconnect glow plug electrical connector using a pair of pliers.
  1. Remove glow plug using 10mm socket.
  1. Clean and inspect glow plug tip for damage. Replace if damaged.
Installation
  1. Install glow plug and tighten to 19 Nm (14 lb-ft).
  1. Connect glow plug electrical connector. Make sure glow plug wiring is routed to avoid moving parts.
--------------------------------------------------------------
Glow Plug Control Glow plugs are used to warm the cylinders to improve cold-engine starting. The PCM uses the engine oil temperature (EOT) sensor and barometric pressure (BARO) sensor to determine how long the glow plugs will be on. The PCM energizes the glow plugs longer if the engine is very cold or if the barometric pressure is low at high altitudes.
The PCM controls the relay that supplies power to the glow plugs with the glow plug control (GPC) signal. When the GPC signal is grounded by the PCM the relay closes, turning the glow plugs on.
The glow plugs are controlled by the following sequence:
  1. PCM energizes the glow plugs.
  1. The PCM energizes the glow plugs immediately after the ignition is placed in the ON position.
  1. The PCM then determines how long glow plugs will be on based on EOT sensor and the BARO sensor. The required time to warm up the cylinder decreases the engine oil temperature and barometric pressure increases at low altitudes.
Glow Plug Lamp Control The glow plug lamp (GPL) signal controls the WAIT TO START light located on the instrument panel. This light is used to indicate when to start the engine. The cylinders are being warmed by the glow plugs during and after this light is lit. The PCM energizes the glow plug lamp longer if the engine is very cold or if the barometric pressure is low.
When the GPL signal is brought low, the "Wait to Start" lamp is turned on.
The glow plug lamp is controlled by the following sequence:
  1. PCM lights the WAIT TO START light after a key on reset occurs.
The PCM determines the glow plug lamp activation time based on engine oil temperature, barometric pressure and battery voltage.
  1. PCM turns off the WAIT TO START light.
The glow plug lamp is turned off when the timer counts to the number of seconds specified by the PCM. The glow plugs will normally remain on longer than the "Wait to Start" lamp.
-----------------------------------

Mar 14, 2009 | 2004 Ford F350

1 Answer

Nissan vanette not starting from cold


it sounds like there is a short in the glow plug suply circut if they dont work when installed into the engine you might try wiggling the connectors

Dec 01, 2008 | 2002 Nissan Altima

3 Answers

Nissan vanette not starting from cold


My vanette had exactly the same problem yesterday. The glow plugs have a timer and a relay. I think that if the light on the dash goes on and off as normal then its probably the relay not the timer. So I have replaced the relay (£50 nissan dealer only) which is located in the center console below the radio/heater controls. Until its really cold again tomorrow I wont know if its really cured it but I'm fairly certain that will be it.

Oct 21, 2008 | 1990 Nissan Minivan

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