Question about 1999 Chevrolet Malibu

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My 1999 Malibu has had ice on the inside windows and windshield during these freezing temps. before the really cold weather they steamed up on the inside? This did not happen last winter?

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Try setting the recirculation option on the AC control to recirculate. Somtimes when set it to fresh air it lets moisture in from outside even when the car is not running. It's a long shot but I bet it works. Lone99star

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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This could be caused by a leak in your heater core,,do you notice the steaming up more on the passenger side,,then it will most likely be the heater core which is leaking coolant into the car.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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Power steering was leaking. I put in ps stop leak in Florida and came to Pa...in freezing temps. In the morning I found a large puddle of ps fluid. I fill resevoir with ps fluid but it doesnt stay in. Do...


every possibility that the stop leak increased the viscosity and the leaking hose could not handle the extra pressure in cold weather
Additives are really a waste of time as it is a stop measure that could have cost you a life when calling into a steering shop would have taken 1 hour and fixed the problem

Mar 13, 2015 | 1999 Dodge Durango

Tip

Deicing Your Windows


Summary: During the winter months, or even a freak spring storm, it isn't uncommon to find the windows of your car covered in ice. Deicing your windows can be a bitterly cold experience, so why not learn the best possible ways for both preventing ice from forming on your windows and removing it in a hurry when you need to. Here's how. I really don't like going outside every morning to deice my windows. If you live in cooler (or even colder) climates, then chances are pretty good that you know what I'm referring to.

Over the years I have tried many different methods for deicing windows. I discovered that some work (though at a risk) while others seem to work just fine at preventing ice from forming (what better way of deicing your windows-provided you remember to do it, and others work-but require you to get really cold. Here are some methods, and a brief description of what happened to me when I used them.
  • Defroster. Probably the most common method available. Unfortunately, this method also comes with risks. While a properly working defroster can quickly (no more than 20 minutes usually) remove icy build up, it can also worsen any preexisting cracks in your windshields if turned on too high. There is another drawback to this method, and that is its cost. You can't really run the defroster without turning on the engine, and that takes gasoline.
  • Scraper. The traditional method for removing ice from windshields, a scraper should be in every vehicle that is in a cold climate. In fact, many car rental companies include them in their cars when you rent a vehicle from them during the winter. On average, this method can take about as much time as the defroster method, and while you are not as likely to crack your windshield, you will most likely get cold.
  • Vinegar. One of the best ways for deicing your windshield and windows is to prevent the ice from forming at all. However, not everyone has a garage that they can store their car in. In those situations, it is best to use a 50/50 solution of vinegar and water. Use half vinegar (any kind, though I prefer white since it does not smell as much) and half water in a spray bottle and spray it on your windows at night. This helps prevent ice from forming. The only drawback is that you have to remember to use it at night, otherwise it doesn't do you very much good. Although you can still remove ice by spraying some on your windows in the morning, you'll just need a whole lot more.
  • Rubbing Alcohol. For those who really need to move, try putting about 5 tablespoons of rubbing alcohol into your windshield washer reservoir. This turns the regular windshield washer fluid into a deicing agent at a fraction of the cost, and works wonderfully. Simply spray and use your windshield wipers as normal.
  • Blanket. This is perhaps the easiest way to prevent ice build up on your windshield. Just place a blanket over your windshield at night, and remove it before driving anywhere.

on Feb 03, 2011 | Chevrolet Malibu Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I smell antifreeze and my heater is blowing cold air in my 97 eclipse


Hey there,

Your heater core is done. In cold weather the inner windshield area directly under your defrost vents will begin to frost over, and actually ice over in really cold weather. That is because of the nasty stuff being released. The part itself is not that expensive, but the service is due to having to disassemble the whole dash. Do yourself a favor and.avoid turning the fan or heater on until you get it fixed. Toxic stuff.

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Try Solution #1 First, Least Expensive, Non-Lethal Condition.

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Dodge caravan 1996 During cold weather wiper malfunction


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Sounds to me like the "parking" contacts inside the wiper motor have broken off / worn.
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My 1999 Malibu sunroof works when the weather is fairly warm but during cooler temps. the sunroof will partially open and not close.


Its probably sticking on the rubber seals, when warm the rubber is pliable, when cold it stiffens up, try cleaning the rubber seal with alcohol, when cleaned put some armor-all on a rag and wipe the seal down with it, also some silicone spray helps...

Aug 22, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Malibu

2 Answers

Side windows frost up bad in cold weather.


They sell a spray in auto store or walmart car section that you can spray on the window and it automatically defrosts it.

Aug 12, 2009 | 1994 Mazda MX-3

1 Answer

Windows won't stay defrosted.


I suspect you're having the same or a similar problem that I have - that your heater core might have a pin-hole leak. It'd be somewhat confirmed if you're finding that you have to replace antifreeze more than once every couple of weeks or so. If you haven't been checking that regularly, next time the engine is cold, take off the radiator cap. If the coolant is up to right below the cap, and the coolant tank is shows you have coolant (and someone hasn't been maintaining this on a frequent basis) then I'm wrong. What happens if you have the leak is that every time you stop the car, the engine-heated coolant vapor rises out through the defog/defrost ducts and condenses on the cold windshield. Worse is that the water evaporates, leaving the coolant on the windshield, and it has an affinity for water - so the next time you stop, the problem is a little worse - more water on the inside of the windshield. Enough of that, and cold enough weather, and it freezes. Another possible problem is that the heater core is becoming plugged, and isn't able to move enough heated water to make enough warm air. Either one of these means that you get the priviledge of having the heater core replaced. From what I've seen on other pages, changing this involves draining the cooling system, removing the freon from the A/C, removing the dash (the whole thing) from the firewall, to gain access to the heater and A/C cooling coil, replacing the heater core, re-assembling the dash, replacing the coolant, and recharging the A/C. Standard shop time is 9 hours. Some have commented that if you're an experienced mechanically adept person, you might manage it in 6 hours. I'm waiting for the weather to warm up a bit, and learn more about the dash remove and replace process, before I take my wheels out of service.

Jan 23, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Durango

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