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Oil pressure gauge won't read oil pressure - 1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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Check the oil sending unit its on the passanger side right by the oil filter.See if it is unplugged or broken.If the oil was change resently that could be your problem

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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Oil pressure


If the manual T gauge is giving a higher oil pressure reading than the gauge on your dash - believe the manual gauge.

The oil pressure gauge on your dash receives a signal from an oil pressure sensor. It may well be that the oil pressure sensor is faulty

Mar 25, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Oil level is normally at 40 however while driving it suddenly dropped to the 0 mark the it begins to read all over the gauge. Oil level is good I NEED HELP!!!!!


The reading on the gauge is not oil level, that is oil pressure. If you have lost oil pressure you either have a bad oil sending unit, bad gauge, or an actual pressure issue. If you can connect a manual gauge and verify if you do or do not have pressure is the first step. If you do have pressure with the mechanical gauge then you simply need to figure out if you need a sending unit or a gauge. If you do not have pressure with a mechanical gauge the only answer is internal with a clogged sump tube, failed oil pump, or spun bearing.

Jan 16, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Has 358000 miles, just had leaks repaired. Twice since my oil pressure gauge reads no pressure but not all the time? Why


1. Oil Pressure Gauge Not Working You will notice this happens when your oil pressure gauge is not reading, whether the engine is turned off, idle or running. Try to step on the gas to rev up the engine. If the oil pressure gauge still doesn't change its reading, your gauge is busted. It's best to replace it as soon as possible because you won't have any idea if your car is already overheating or not.
2. Oil Pressure Gauge Reading Too Low When your engine is idle, the oil pressure gauge will have a low reading. When the engine starts running or when you're already cruising or on the freeway, your gauge's reading should have increased. If it stays on a low reading, then you now your oil pressure gauge is broken.
3. Oil Pressure Gauge Reading Too High Another common oil pressure gauge problem is when your oil pressure gauge is reading too high when your engine is idle or when it's turned off. Rep

Oct 24, 2015 | 2001 GMC Yukon XL

2 Answers

My 2001 Ford Ranger Edge oil pressure gauge has been jumping around all over the place. Took it in today and they said pump needs replacing... and that they had to remove the engine to do so at the tune of...


Your oil pressure gauge works with the oil pressure sensor, which is screwed into the block, to transmit a reading. A faulty oil pressure sensor can cause the reading on the gauge to be erratic. You may have a bad oil pressure sensor. You should also inspect the wires going to the sender to make sure they are not loose, corroded, or shorted. If a new sending unit doesn't work, you can check the oil pressure with a manual pressure gauge. Testing for oil pressure involves fitting the oil pressure gauge with an adapter. Then you will need to determine if you have a gauge problem or an actual oil pressure problem.

Oct 22, 2013 | Ford Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How can i fix the oil pump


see this tips and fix it. God bless you
The oil pump supplies oil to lubricate your engine. If the oil pump is worn or is not turning, the engine will suffer a loss of oil pressure, which may result in engine damage or engine failure.
The first sign of trouble may be a low oil pressure warning light, a drop in the normal reading on you oil pressure gauge (if your car has one), or the appearance of ticking or clattering sounds from your engine.
As a rule, most engines only need about 10 PSI of oil pressure for every 1,000 RPM of engine speed. Oil pressure will read higher than normal when a cold engine is first started because the oil is thick. Oil pressure will gradually drop as the engine warms up and the oil thins out. So normal oil pressure on a warm engine cruising down the highway is typically 30 PSI up to 45 PSI.
SYMPTOMS OF OIL PUMP TROUBLE
The first thing you should do if any of these symptoms occur is to stop your car, turn off the engine, let it sit for a few minutes, then check the oil level on the dipstick. If the oil level is at or below the ADD line, add a quart of oil to bring the level back up to the full mark. Add as much oil as is needed to raise the level to the full mark. Then restart the engine. If the warning light remains on, or the oil pressure reading does not climb back up to its normal range, or the engine noise does not go away, you may have a bad oil pump.
The other possibilities include a bad oil pressure sending unit, or a problem with the oil pressure warning light circuit or oil pressure gauge.
OIL PRESSURE SENDING UNIT
If the engine is NOT making any unusual noises and seems to be running normally, and the oil level on the dipstick is FULL, but you are still getting a low oil pressure warning light or low gauge reading, the fault could be a bad oil pressure sending unit.
The oil pressure sending unit is mounted on the engine block. On some applications, there is a spring-loaded pressure-sensitive diaphragm with a switch inside the sending unit. This switch completes the circuit to the low oil pressure warning light if oil pressure drops below a certain threshold. The unit may stop working if the diaphragm inside fails, if the switch is stuck, if the small hole that allows oil to enter the sending unit becomes plugged, if there is a loose, corroded or broken wiring connector at the sending unit, or there is a fault in the wiring circuit between the sending unit and warming light.
On vehicles that have an oil pressure gauge (electronic, not mechanical), the oil pressure sending unit has a small rheostat inside that sends a variable voltage signal to the oil pressure gauge when the diaphragm moves. A worn spot on the rheostat or any of the other problems just described for the simple pressure-type oil pressure switches can cause a problem.
FORD'S FAKE OIL PRESSURE GAUGE
On many Ford vehicles that were built from 1980 through the 1990s, the oil pressure sending unit has two switches, a low pressure and a high pressure. These vehicles also have an oil pressure gauge, but the reading on the gauge is not a true indication of real oil pressure. As long as the pressure to the sending unit is between high and low, the gauge will read normal. If oil pressure drops and trips the low pressure switch, the dash gauge will now read low. Or, if oil pressure goes up and trips the high switch inside the sending unit, the dash gauge will read high. Consequently, don't rely on the oil pressure gauge for an accurate reading in these vehicles. It is only a gross indication if the oil pressure is low, normal or high.
OIL GAUGE PROBLEMS
If the engine is NOT making any unusual noises and seems to be running normally, the oil level on the dipstick is FULL, and you have replaced the oil pressure sending unit but are still getting a low oil pressure reading on the dash gauge, the fault could be in the wiring circuit between the sending unit and gauge, or the gauge itself might be bad.
Check the wiring connections on both ends as well as wiring continuity between the sending unit and gauge. If no wiring faults are found, hook up a pressure gauge directly to the oil pressure port on the engine and check oil pressure with the engine running. If the engine-mounted gauge shows normal oil pressure but the dash gauge is reading low, the problem is a bad dash gauge.
On the other hand, if the engine-mounted pressure gauge reads low and you have done all of the above, chances are the oil pump is worn, or it is not picking up enough oil because of a restriction or blockage in the pickup screen in the bottom of the crankcase.
OIL PUMP PICKUP PROBLEMS
The pickup tube has a screen on the end to prevent large chunks of anything bad that ends up in the crankcase from being sucked into the pump. But we are talking BIG chunks of debris, not normal wear particles or carbon or dust or other microscopic-sized abrasive particles that can cause pump wear over time.

Sep 28, 2012 | 1996 Toyota Tercel

1 Answer

Low oil pressure


could be as simple as your gage isn't working or it could be your oil pump needs to be replaced, if it isnt burnning oil and isnt loosing oil more than likly it's your gage ,if the pump's not working you won't get oil; to the engine and will over heat and could lock up

Apr 04, 2012 | 2001 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

Oil pressure gauge reads zero, engine appears to be running fine with no noises what so ever, no oil leaks, oil level is normal.


The oil pressure should be verified by removing the oil pressure sending unit and installing a gauge to take a direct reading. If the oil pressure is ok, the problem is most likely a bad pressure sensor (although it could also be a bad gauge or circuits).

If the gauge verifies that the oil pressure is indeed low, then the oil pan needs to come of for an inspection of the oil pick-up tube and the engine bearings.

Nov 20, 2011 | 1999 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

Low oil presure


perform a master oil pressure test. this is done by removing the oil pressure sending unit and installing a oil pressure gauge. if the reading on the test gauge is ok, the sending unit needs to be replaced. if the pressure reads low on the test gauge, there may be excessive bearing wear or you may have worn valve guides. good luck!

Apr 29, 2010 | 1997 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

Oil pressure gauge reads 80 psi with engine off and pegs running


That is probably a defective oil pressure gauge or a broken oil pressure sender, it reads 80 psi just because that is the maximum value allowed.

Pressure can be verified by reading it with a gauge tool.
If you really have pressure over 70 psi when engine is running then start replacing the oil filter, and check that the oil lines from pump are not obstructed, if there is nothing in there then replace oil pump.

If instead the gauge reads 80 with engine off, that is a defective pressure gauge.

Feb 25, 2009 | 2003 GMC Sierra 1500

2 Answers

Fluctuation on the oil pressure gauge reading


The oil pressure sending unit is a sensor with an internal diaphragm, if the internal diaphragm is damaged , or the line to the diaphragm is blocked you can get this kind of fluctuation on the oil pressure gauge.

The oil pressure value must be read by installing a mechanical gauge near to the oil pressure switch and checking the pressure.

If pressure is ok, replace the sending unit. If there is a real pressure drop, check the oil pump.

If you still get fluctualtion after replacing the oil pressure sending unit, replace the oil pressure gauge.

Nov 24, 2008 | 2003 Toyota Sequoia

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