Question about 1991 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

Can't get higher RPM's, mileage down to 5 mpg

On Dec 12, 2008 the ignition went dead.
Installed a new ignition module under distributor cap.
After Christmas it lost ability to accelerate
0 - 55 in 3 minutes. Can only drive with just the slightest pressure on the accelerator.
Even in neutral cannot get high RPM's, engine just bogs down.
Replaced catalytic converter - no change in symptoms.
Noticed over the last two days that the mileage is down to about 5 mpg.

Posted by on

  • robmarquardt Jan 15, 2009

    Mine has TBI too.
    Will let you know on throttle position sensor.
    Thanks


  • robmarquardt Jan 16, 2009

    Found it.
    Clogged fuel filter.


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Rob, it sounds like a throttle position switch to me. My 95 suburban with TBI had a similar problem and that fixed it. You may need a volt/ohm meter to rig it if you don't have a code reader that will monitor the values. I think the switch was about $25. Not sure if yours has a TBI or carburetor.

Good luck

Posted on Jan 15, 2009

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1 Answer

How to remove the pick-up coil from the distributor. 1989 GMC 1500 4X4


The distributor does have to be removed and dis-assembled in order to replace the ignition pick-up coil/stator, and if the pick-up coil/stator is faulty then the distributor should be replaced because the distributor will come with a new pick-up coil/stator and the old distributor will have to be removed anyway and in the long run it will actually save money from not having to pay a mechanic to remove and dis-assemble the distributor to replace the pick-up coil/stator, however most of the time it is the ignition module inside of the distributor that is faulty.




When the engine is at TDC (Top Dead Center) is the ignition rotor pointing to the #1 position on the distributor housing as described below?



The engine should be set on TDC (Top Dead Center) with the distributor cap removed, and there is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on top dead center. (Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing)

This static timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at top dead center.



If the engine is at TDC and the ignition rotor does not point to the #1 mark on the distributor housing, then loosen the hold down bolt to the distributor and turn the distributor until the rotor is pointing to the #1 mark on the distributor and then tighten the distributor hold down bolt.


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Jun 24, 2012 | GMC K1500 Cars & Trucks

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I have a 1993 chev pick-up v6 4.3, i just installed new spark plugs,new plug wires, distributor cap and rotor button.All plug wires are back in the right position,and i used the firing order 1-6-5-4-3-2...


This diagram is for 1998-1995 Chevy 6 cylinder 4.3L engines.
Your got the firing order exactly correct, at 1-6-5-4-3-2, but here's the thing to double-check:
The distributor rotation is clockwise (note badly rendered arrow in picture).



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Since you probably got everything right, then you're left with really unusual/rare causes of
failure of the ignition system:
(a) rotor button misaligned/failing to make contact?
(b) rotor button not pressed onto distributor shaft far enough therefore failing to provide correct
proximity to distributor cap contacts when coil fires
(c) coil wire or contact loose/disconnected - press coil wire firmly down into distributor cap.
(d) distributor shaft of other damage caused during installation of rotor.
(e) spark plug wires defective from factory
(f) spark plugs defective from factory
(g) battery low - may need a charge to start
(h) ICM (ignition control module) failure - hook up your HEI (high energy ignition) tester, and
watch the quality of the spark on each cylinder.
(i) fuel problem? If spark is being properly delivered, its gotta be a fuel problem...
(j) distributor cap not screwed down flush to top of distributor? maybe just on one side?

Inspect the inside of the distributor cap - if there are lots of little metal bits all over the inside
of the distributor cap, then you know you have a misalignment of some type in there, and the
rotor and cap are destroying each other. normal operation will throw a quota of spark-ed off
metal bits inside the distributor cap, but since your cap is brand new, your attempts to start
the engine should have rotated the distributor so few times, you should see no metal debris.

Inspect the distributor cap contacts to see if any spark marks are more of less in the middle
of the cap's proper "contact zone". If not, you've diagnosed an internal misalignment, which
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Sep 14, 2011 | Chevrolet 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I need to know how to set the distrubtor


The ignition timing is not adjusted with a timing light or with the engine running, and to set the ignition timing follow these procedures.

There is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on TDC. (Top Dead Center) This "Static" timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at TDC.

1. Place the engine at top dead center.

2. Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing (usually has a #6 for 6 cylinder engines or a #8 for 8 cylinder engines) indicating the number one TDC alignment position.

3. With the engine on top dead center the ignition rotor should be pointing to the number one TDC alignment mark or notch that is on the distributor housing, if it is not then loosen up the distributor and turn the distributor until the ignition rotor is pointing to and aligned with the TDC alignment mark or notch on the distributor housing and then tighten down the distributor, the engine should now be "Static" timed. (The more precise that you are aligning the TDC alignment mark with the ignition rotor the better the engine will run, and it will be less likely that there will be a camshaft to crankshaft correlation problem)

If the distributor can not be turned enough to align the ignition rotor with the number one TDC alignment mark on the distributor housing, or the distributor does not set properly and will not allow the installation of the spark plug wires then the distributor is not installed correctly and is most likely a tooth off and it will need to be re-installed correctly. (The distributor should set like it is shown in the firing order diagram when it is properly installed)

Here is a firing order diagram to also help assist you.

Some distributors have the hold down bracket secured onto the distributor housing and the distributor can not be turned into alignment and then tightened down into that position, and these distributors will only fit into the engine and correctly align on "Static" timing one certain way, and when it is correct the distributor hold down bracket bolt can be installed and the TDC alignment mark on the distributor housing will remain properly aligned with the ignition rotor.


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Nov 18, 2010 | 1998 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

Blown head gasket, replaced and now cant time. all books and web say that the vehical is not timeable it has to be done by a comp. tech 2. but we went to dealer and their tech 2 couldn't read it. i cant...


The ignition timing is not adjusted with a timing light or with the engine running, and to set the ignition timing follow these procedures.

There is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on top dead center. This "static" timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at top dead center.

1. Place the engine at top dead center.

2. Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing indicating the number one position.

3. With the engine on top dead center the ignition rotor should be pointing to the number one mark or notch that is on the distributor housing, if it is not then loosen up the distributor and turn the distributor until the ignition rotor is pointing to the mark or notch on the distributor housing and then tighten down the distributor, the engine should now be static timed.

If the distributor can not be turned enough to align the ignition rotor with the number one mark on the distributor housing, or the distributor does not set properly and will not allow the installation of the spark plug wires then the distributor is not installed correctly and is most likely a tooth off and it will need to be re-installed correctly. (The distributor should set like it is shown in the firing order diagram when it is properly installed)


Let me know if you require a firing order diagram or any further assistance.

Sep 23, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

What is the timing specs for a chevy 98 suburban V8 350 gas.


The ignition timing is not adjusted with a timing light or with the engine running, and to set the ignition timing follow these proceedures.

There is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on top dead center. This "static" timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at top dead center.

1. Place the engine at top dead center.

2. Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing indicating the number one position.

3. With the engine on top dead center the ignition rotor should be pointing to the number one mark or notch that is on the distributor housing, if it is not then loosen up the distributor and turn the distributor until the ignition rotor is pointing to the mark or notch on the distributor housing and then tighten down the distributor, the engine should now be static timed.

If the distributor can not be turned enough to align the ignition rotor with the number one mark on the distributor housing, or the distributor does not set properly and will not allow the installation of the spark plug wires then the distributor is not installed correctly and is most likely a tooth off and it will need to be re-installed correctly. (The distributor should set like it is shown in the firing order diagram when it is properly installed)

Here is a firing order diagram to also help assist you.


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Aug 05, 2010 | Chevrolet Suburban 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1999 silverado 4.3 cranks but no start can hear fuel pump, swaped out coil and crank sensor w/ known good parts no change, engine did start once after coil was changed ran rough and stalled and wont...


First check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

To replace the distributor follow this procedure;

The ignition timing is not adjusted with a timing light or with the engine running, and to set the ignition timing follow these procedures.

There is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on top dead center. This "static" timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at top dead center.

Removal;

1. With the engine at top dead center.

2. Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing indicating the number one position.

3. With the engine on top dead center the ignition rotor should be pointing to the number one mark or notch that is on the distributor housing, Then make a reference mark of the position that the ignition rotor is pointing to (out on the engine or firewall) and the more precise you mark the position, the easier the installation of the new distributor will be. This will be reference mark #1.

4. Remove the distributor lock down bolt, (the lock down clamp will most likely be attached to the distributor and if so it should not be removed from the distributor) then slowly lift up on the distributor about three inches and note the direction that the ignition rotor turns, and when the ignition rotor stops turning then mark the position that the ignition rotor is pointing to (out on the engine or firewall) and then lift the distributor striaght up and out, and remove the gasket or any left over gasket material from the intake manifold. The more precise you mark the position the easier it will be to install the new distributor and an assistant might be helpful. This will be reference mark #2

Once the distributor has been removed it is important that the engine does not get cranked over by the starter or the crankshaft turned at all, or the reference marks will become useless.

Installation;

Be sure that the new distributor is complete with a new module and that there is a new gasket in place on the distributor.

1. Lower the distributor with gasket down into the distrbutor well and align the ignition rotor with the #2 reference mark and when the distributor gear engages the drive gear on the camshaft then the ignition rotor should turn to the #1 reference mark as the distributor sets all the way back down flush on the intake manifold.

2. Install and tighten the lock down bolt, and If the distributor is properly installed then the ignition rotor should be pointing to the #1 reference mark and the #1 position on the distributor housing with the engine on top dead center.

Replace the distributor cap and connect the spark plug wires, and see if the engine will start, if the engine does start and the check engine light does not come on (assuming that it was not on before) then the distributor is properly installed and there is no further timing requirements.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.



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1 Answer

Installed new crate engine 1997 5.7 vortec, how do you adjust the timing? 1997 GMC Serria 4x4 1500


The ignition timing is not adjusted with a timing light or with the engine running, and to set the ignition timing follow these proceedures.

There is a mark or notch on the distributor housing that the rotor should be pointing to when the engine is on top dead center. This "static" timing is all that matters and the computer will be able to control the timing as long as the ignition rotor is in that position when the engine is at top dead center.

1. Place the engine at top dead center.

2. Look under the distributor cap and find where the number one terminal runs under the distributor cap, and where that position on the distributor cap corresponds with the distributor housing, and it should match up to a mark or a notch on the distributor housing indicating the number one position.

3. With the engine on top dead center the ignition rotor should be pointing to the number one mark or notch that is on the distributor housing, if it is not then loosen up the distributor and turn the distributor until the ignition rotor is pointing to the mark or notch on the distributor housing and then tighten down the distributor, the engine should now be static timed.

If the distributor can not be turned enough to align the ignition rotor with the number one mark on the distributor housing, or the distributor does not set properly and will not allow the installation of the spark plug wires then the distributor is not installed correctly and is most likely a tooth off and it will need to be re-installed correctly. (The distributor should set like it is shown in the firing order diagram when it is properly installed)

Here is a firing order diagram to also help assist you.


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