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Have to push brake pedal too hard to stop car

Just had brake pads installed. now I have to start stepping on brake pedal way ahead of time for the car to stop.

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Check to make sure you have a decent amount of brake fluid and if that doesn't work ask whoever installed your brake pads ask them if they
bleeded your break lines when they were done

Posted on Dec 12, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: squishy brake feel with long pedal travel but brakes stop the car

You have to remove the air trapped in the hydraulic system. Look at change of brakefluid in a repair handbook and perform it as described.

Useful to change the brakefluid at least once every five years anyway.

Posted on Oct 03, 2009

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co7196
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SOURCE: hard brake pedal hear air leaking when pedal pushed

When you press on the brake? Have your brake vacuum assist checked. It,s that bigspaceship looking thing between the brake master cylinder an firewall. good luck and be safe.

Posted on May 25, 2009

  • 201 Answers

SOURCE: 1993 toyota landcruiser brake problem

sounds like vacuum brake booster diaphram has failed. its behind master cylinder and probably needs replacing.

Posted on May 08, 2009

txkjun
  • 409 Answers

SOURCE: brake pedal is hard to push and the car doesn't stop very well

Yes it could be the booster.

Posted on Dec 26, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: my brake pedal is hard

i guess your brake booster is the problem. try this.... engine not running just pump the brake at least 25 times at the 25 count,just keep your feet on the brake pedal and start the engine. if the brake pedal won't go down even a little... your brake booster is gone. or something with the vacuum.

Posted on Aug 09, 2008

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1 Answer

Why is it so hard to apply brake pedal?


_______power brake booster, check vacuum to booster and the check valve for brake booster. primary symtom is high hard pedal that requires greater then normal pedal pressure to stop car. testing booster= pump brakes several times with engine off to deplete stored vacuum. turn on engine with pushing slightly on brake pedal. you should be able to feel the pedal fade away a bit, and then become firm. But not hard. if you feel nothing at the pedal when engine starts. Brake booster is not working. Good-day! make sure vacuum is going to booster with engine running. it may just be a bad vacuum line or check valve.

Apr 30, 2014 | 1984 Buick Skyhawk

1 Answer

1993 buick lesabre changed the front rotars and pads and now the cars brake pedal is so hard to push down to get car to stop. Mechanic has checked both the front and back brakes and they are fine. T


I would jack up a front wheel and see if pushing on the pedal with the engine running will stop the wheel from turning.
You need to know if the pressure is reaching the wheels, or if the pads and rotors are too slick to stop the car.
Usually if the pedal is hard, the booster is not working or the brakes are glazed.
Can you stop the car with the parking brake ? That only uses the rear brakes.
You may need a second opinion from a different shop.

Jul 19, 2012 | Buick LeSabre Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Did complete brake job on 1997 Ford Escort wagon no abs rear shoes, drums, lines, wheel cylinders,even changed the block at the rear were the lines go in & out of. Front lines hoses pads, caliplers...


is brake pedal hard to push down without engine running ,if so proceed to step two and thats to start engine and then push on brake and if pedal softer to push then the servo is working ,now if excessive pedal travel with engine running then remove the rear drums ,make sure the outside lip is cleaned out and then adjust the brake shoes manually till they rub when you turn the drum ,this will cure it but remember that it has to bed in of course new pads brake disks ,new shoes and drums it has to bed in so give it a chance .

Aug 24, 2011 | 1997 Ford Escort

1 Answer

I have recently installed reconditioned brake pads on one wheel. the problem is that my brakes are sort of gone. you have to step on the pedal hard. and when not moving when you step on the pedal it...


You always change the set i.e both the wheels with new(u dont take risk with the wheels) BUT the other problem of pushing hard is that your brake booster is not working its a kind of drum in the engine compartment exactly opposite your steering wheel get it checked

Jan 20, 2011 | Toyota Camry Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I recently changed the brake pads and rotors. in the process of changing them i bleed the brake fluid to push in the caliper. Soon after when everything back into place, we tested the brakes. the brake...


bleed your brakes. new pads always take time to break in. Everytime I change a set they are never as good as the ones I replaced until after a little break in period. Do you have a high pedal or low pedal?

Nov 18, 2010 | 1996 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

How do you replace the front rotors on an 1999 Chevy express van 1500?


REMEMBER TO REPLACE THE PADS AS WELL, NO USED PADS ON NEW ROTORS.

Raise the vehicle and support on jack stands. Remove the wheels. Place the drip pan under the caliper. Loosen the 10 mm bleeder screw on the top of the caliper.
  • Step 2 Spread the brake pads apart with the common screwdriver. Place the screwdriver in the slot in the center of the caliper where the pads can be seen. With the nose of the screwdriver, pry between the rotor and the pad and pull the caliper outward toward you. The piston is being depressed into its housing as the caliper is pulled out. When the caliper comes to its limit outward, push the caliper back away from you and insert the screwdriver into the inside pad between the pad and the rotor. Once again pull the screwdriver toward you until the caliper piston is compressed into its bore.
  • Step 3 Tighten the 10 mm bleeder screw. Remove the caliper and support it where it is not hanging on the brake hose. Letting the caliper hang on the brake hose will damage the hose and cause brake failure.
  • Step 4 Remove the caliper support if it interferes with the removal of the rotor. Some vehicles don't require the removal of the support. Remove the rotor by pulling it off. If it is stuck, hit it with a hammer a few times between the studs.
  • Step 5 Install the caliper support and caliper in the reverse order they were taken off. Install the wheels and let the vehicle down. Check the brake fluid and fill as necessary to the proper level.
  • Step 6 Start the vehicle and pump the brakes very slowly until you have a high pedal. Remember that by expanding the calipers they have to re-adjust. You will not have any braking when you first start the car. Do not try to move the car until you have pumped the brake pedal sufficiently to feel a firm pedal.
    Rear-Wheel-Drive Vehicles
  • Step 1 Raise the vehicle and support on jack stands. Remove the wheels. Place the drip pan under the caliper. Loosen the 10 mm bleeder screw on the top of the caliper.
  • Step 2 Spread the brake pads apart with the common screwdriver. Place the screwdriver in the slot in the center of the caliper where the pads can be seen. With the nose of the screwdriver, pry between the rotor and the pad and pull the caliper outward toward you. The piston is being depressed into its housing as the caliper is pulled out. When the caliper comes to its limit outward, push the caliper back away from you and insert the screwdriver into the inside pad between the pad and the rotor. Once again, pull the screwdriver toward you until the caliper piston is compressed into its bore.
  • Step 3 Tighten the 10 mm bleeder screw. Remove the caliper and support it where it is not hanging on the brake hose. Letting the caliper hang on the brake hose will damage the hose and cause brake failure.
  • Step 4 Remove the bearing cap in the center of the rotor. Remove the cotter pin. Remove the large nut that retains the bearings and rotor. Wobble the rotor with your hands and the front bearing will come out.
  • Step 5 Reinstall the spindle nut with just a few threads. Grabbing the rotor with both hands, pull the rotor off with slight down pressure and with a quick ****. The spindle nut will grab the rear bearing and seal as you pull the rotor off and come out at the same time.
  • Step 6 Install the bearings into the new rotor. Grease the bearings first and install the rear large bearing then install the grease seal with the hammer. Install the rotor on the spindle and insert the front small bearing followed by the large washer and the retaining nut.
  • Step 7 Tighten the retaining nut just until there is no longer any freeplay then tighten an additional 90 degrees. Do not over tighten the retaining nut as it will not allow the bearings to expand and they will wear out rapidly. Install the cotter pin.
  • Step 8 Install the caliper support and caliper in the reverse order they were taken off. Install the wheels and let the vehicle down. Check the brake fluid and fill as necessary to the proper level.
  • Step 9 Start the vehicle and pump the brakes very slowly until you have a high pedal. Remember that by expanding the calipers they have to re-adjust. You will not have any braking when you first start the car. Do not try to move the car until you have pumped the brake pedal sufficiently to feel a firm pedal
  • Nov 11, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

    1 Answer

    Instructions Instructions for Replacing Rear Break Pads. Hyundai


    Things You'll Need:
    • New brake pads
    • C-clamp
    • Allen head, star head, or 6-point socket wrench
    • Lug nut wrench
    • Brake fluid
      Remove the old Brake Pads
    1. Step 1 Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car, make sure the car is in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.
    2. Step 2 Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and brake fluid container. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.
    3. Step 3 Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.
    4. Step 4 Use the socket wrench to remove the lower caliper bolt from the back of the caliper. Rotate the caliper up.
    5. Step 5 Remove the brake pads from the caliper.
    6. Install the new Brake Pads
    7. Step 1 Insert the pads into the caliper.
    8. Step 2 Place a large C-clamp on the body of the caliper and slowly tighten the clamp evenly. Compress the piston until it is flush with the caliper.
    9. Step 3 Lower the caliper and use the socket wrench to attach the lower caliper bolt. Tighten the bolt to 16 to 24 ft. lbs. (22 to 32 Nm).
    10. Step 4 Replace the tire wheel assembly tire. Lower the car to the ground. Pump the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads.
    11. Step 5 Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.
    12. Step 6 Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

    Jul 08, 2009 | 2005 Hyundai Tucson

    1 Answer

    Front brake pads


    Raise And Support Truck, Remove Wheel, Remove 2 Bolts Holding Brake Caliper On , Use Large "C" Clamp to Push Piston IN to Open up Space for New Pads Install Pads Reverse of How They came Out, Place Caliper Onto Rotor / Ancor and Install 2 Bolts.--------Do This ONE AT A TIME and After Completion Start Engine and Softly PUMP Brake Pedal Untill It Returns to Normal Hight. Hope this hellps you .

    Jun 03, 2009 | 2005 Ford F-150

    1 Answer

    My brake pedal is hard to push in. the car wont/ is hard to stop. i replace the brake pads and the calipers. what could be the problem now?


    i guess your brake booster is the problem. try this.... engine not running just pump the brake at least 25 times at the 25 count,just keep your feet on the brake pedal and start the engine. if the brake pedal won't go down even a little... your brake booster is gone. or something with the vacuum.

    Jul 28, 2008 | 2004 Dodge Grand Caravan

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