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Car engine running rich how to fix

I replaced all the oxygen sensors and it still is running rich I had a mechanic use a scanner and it said to replace the sensors and i did he scanned it again and says the same thing

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The mechanic doesn't know how to diagnose the problem

Codes are use to diagnose the system with the fault code,
not to tell you what parts to replace

Try another shop

Posted on Dec 08, 2012

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2005 jeep grand cherokee Po204 205 175 174 138 158. Runs rough. Whats wrong?


PO204,205 are injector circuit malfunction,PO174 is a system lean code, PO175 is system rich code, PO138 is heated oxygen sensor bank1 sensor 2 circuit high voltage, PO158 is heated oxygen sensor bank2 sensor 2 circuit high voltage. This is a repair for your mechanic. When they fix the injector and o2 circuits the rich lean codes will also be repaired. Continued driving will ruin your catalytic converter. Good luck

Jun 13, 2015 | 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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Which Oxygen Sensor Is It?


There are many inquiries online about which oxygen sensor to change. Oxygen sensor failure codes are very common on a lot of vehicles. With all of today's vehicles having at least two oxygen sensors and many having three or four of them, it can be a little confusing as to which one is causing the problem.

Before we get into which sensor is which, we need to have a little discussion about oxygen sensor fault codes. There are several different types of oxygen sensor fault codes. Here are just some of the most common ones:

P0135 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank1 Sensor 1"
P0141 "Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 2"
P0147 "Oxygen Sensor Circuit Bank 1 Sensor 3"
P0152 "Oxygen Sensor Voltage High Bank 2 Sensor 1"
P0159 "Oxygen Sensor Slow Response Bank 2 Sensor 2"
P0171 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0172 "Oxygen Sensor Lean Sensor 1 Bank 2"
P0174 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 1"
P0175 "Oxygen Sensor Rich Sensor 1 Bank 2"

There are many more possible oxygen sensor codes, but I only listed these to make my point. Many times the oxygen sensor code is NOT caused by the oxygen sensor itself. "Lean" or "Rich" oxygen sensor codes (i.e. P0171, P0174) are usually caused by something other than the oxygen sensor. Something is wrong, causing the engine to run lean (not enough fuel or too much air) or causing the engine to run rich (too much fuel or not enough air). In these cases, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix a thing. (That is, unless you are trying to fix your bank account from having too high of a balance!) The new oxygen sensor will just set the same code as the original one. This is because the oxygen sensor is not CAUSING the problem, it is only REPORTING the problem.

High voltage codes (like P0152 above) can be caused by the oxygen sensor wires being shorted to another wire inside the wiring harness. Sometimes these codes are caused by bad grounds where some other component is trying to ground through the oxygen sensor circuit. Again, replacing the oxygen sensor will not fix this! In short, the problem needs to be diagnosed before running out and buying an oxygen sensor.

Just because a fault code has "Oxygen Sensor" or "O2 Sensor" or "O2S" in its description does not necessarily mean that an oxygen sensor needs to be replaced. Many do-it-yourselfers believe that all there is to fixing the car is to hook it to the "magic box", collect the fault codes and replace the parts the computer tells you to replace. There is nothing further from the truth.

Fault codes only point you toward which SYSTEM is failing. The system must be diagnosed to find the CAUSE of the failure. If this is not done properly, it will only result in wasting a bunch of your money. This is what you were trying to avoid by doing it yourself!

So, after reading all of the above, if you think you still want to replace an oxygen sensor, but don't know which one; here is how to figure it out:

Oxygen sensors are always numbered like this:

Bank 1 Sensor 1
Bank 2 Sensor 1
Bank 1 Sensor 2
Bank 2 Sensor 2

Some manufacturers use a kind of shorthand that reads different, but means the same thing:

Sensor 1/1 or O2s 1/1
Sensor 2/1 or O2s 2/1
Sensor 1/2 or O2s 1/2
Sensor 2/2 or O2s 2/2

Bank 1 is always the side of the engine where cylinder #1 is located and, of course, Bank 2 is the opposite side.
On a 4 cylinder engine, there is only one bank and it is always referred to as Bank 1. The exception to the 4 cylinder rule is on certain 4 cylinder engines (specifically, some Toyotas) there are two catalytic converters used. In this case, Bank 1 sensors will still be in the pipe for the catalyst that is connected to cylinder #1 and Bank 2 sensors will be in the other one.

Sensor 1 is always the "upstream" sensor (the one located BEFORE the catalytic converter).
Sensor 2 is always the "downstream" sensor (the one that is located AFTER the catalytic converter).
Sensor 3 refers to the ONLY "downstream" sensor where there are two sensors before the catalyst and only one after the catalyst. On very few vehicles the reference to this reads "Bank 1 Sensor 3".

If you do not know where cylinder #1 is, then you need to get a diagram of the firing order for your engine. Just post a question on FixYa.com and make sure you give the YEAR, MAKE, MODEL, and ENGINE SIZE of your vehicle and one or more of our experts will be happy to tell you how to find cylinder #1.

- DTTECH
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician


Also check out this article by dttech: What Else Could Be Wrong?

on Apr 29, 2011 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How to test oxygen sensor (s) 2002 chevy tracker?


The sulfur smell is because the 4 cyl is running rich . The issue can be the maf sensor or the 02 sensor going bad or the car needing a tune up. If the sensors are going bad there should be a check engine light on. Read the code for free at any parts store and then google the code they give you for more info on fixing the problem.

Some good news is the sulfur means the cat is functioning.

hope that puts you in the right direction

Jun 02, 2014 | 2002 Chevrolet Tracker

1 Answer

I have the 305tpi and its running rich.the guy that owned it before i did eliminated the o2's...i'm just starting to put money ikt and i want to fix this running rich problem i have...what wou


well replace oxygen sensors that would cause engine to run rich if you remove or disconnect them oxygen sensor control fuel system it will cause engine run rich open loop mode on cold engine start ups as engine warms up it will go closed loop cause leaner fuel mixture.if you replace oxygen sensors could help rich fuel problem if not you could have intake manifold leak or faulty fuel pressure regulator.

Jan 24, 2012 | 1987 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

Shaking when idle in first gear and black smoke when exelerate hard


It sounds like your engine is getting too much fuel. This could be due to a bad oxygen sensor, a bad engine coolant temperature sensor, a bad baro or mass airflow sensor, a bad/leaking fuel pressure regulator, or sticking fuel injectors.

Your Check Engine light should be on if it is smoking black. It should at least have a "Rich Oxygen Sensor" code. I would start by scanning the engine computer for codes.
You can do a quick check on the fuel pressure regulator by pulling the vacuum line off of it while the engine is running. If fuel comes out of the vacuum port, replace the regulator.

All of the rest of the possibilities will require reading the computer data to determine if those parts are malfunctioning. (Or you could just spend a BUNCH of money "guessing" and replacing parts like a lot of DIYers do.)

Please note that if you have a code for "Rich Oxygen Sensor" DO NOT replace the oxygen sensor - it is WORKING. If you get a code for "Lean Oxygen sensor" and it is pouring black smoke, then the problem is MOST LIKELY the oxygen sensor.

Also note that your vehicle is equipped with an EEC V computer system. The generic OBD code readers that they use (to sell you a bunch of parts you probably don't need) at the local parts stores will not work to scan your computer. You need to get your hands on a scanner that has the capability to scan your system or take it to someone who has one.

Jun 17, 2011 | 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis

1 Answer

Engine codes are 12, 51,21,53,55 can someone tell me what these codes are. engine is running extremely rich.


12 is battery has been disconnected recently, or went dead.
51 is Oxygen sensor stuck on lean mixture reading
21- no change in oxygen sensor reading
53- internal problem with logic module
55- is end of message/codes.

51 & 21, basically telling you same thing, but I wouldn't jump at changing oxygen sensor first, as a bad M.A.P. sensor can cause a rich mixture, thus oxygen sensor switches to lean to try and compensate. Personally, I'd go with map sensor first, check connections and vacuum lines if all good, replace it, then I'd go to oxygen sensor .

Oct 21, 2010 | 1993 Dodge Caravan

1 Answer

Replacement of o2 sensor


Every new car, and most cars produced after 1980, have an oxygen sensor. The sensor is part of the emissions control system and feeds data to the engine management computer. The goal of the sensor is to help the engine run as efficiently as possible and also to produce as few emissions as possible.
A gasoline engine burns gasoline in the presence of oxygen (see How Car Engines Work for complete details). It turns out that there is a particular ratio of air and gasoline that is "perfect," and that ratio is 14.7:1 (different fuels have different perfect ratios -- the ratio depends on the amount of hydrogen and carbon found in a given amount of fuel). If there is less air than this perfect ratio, then there will be fuel left over after combustion. This is called a rich mixture. Rich mixtures are bad because the unburned fuel creates pollution. If there is more air than this perfect ratio, then there is excess oxygen. This is called a lean mixture. A lean mixture tends to produce more nitrogen-oxide pollutants, and, in some cases, it can cause poor performance and even engine damage.
The oxygen sensor is positioned in the exhaust pipe and can detect rich and lean mixtures. The mechanism in most sensors involves a chemical reaction that generates a voltage (see the patents below for details). The engine's computer looks at the voltage to determine if the mixture is rich or lean, and adjusts the amount of fuel entering the engine accordingly.
The reason why the engine needs the oxygen sensor is because the amount of oxygen that the engine can pull in depends on all sorts of things, such as the altitude, the temperature of the air, the temperature of the engine, the barometric pressure, the load on the engine, etc.
When the oxygen sensor fails, the computer can no longer sense the air/fuel ratio, so it ends up guessing. Your car performs poorly and uses more fuel than it needs to.
More to come soon! presently looking for detail instruction on how to repair or replace.
I found this link with info on the sensor .... might be helpful

Oct 06, 2009 | 2003 Lexus ES 300

2 Answers

1998 Saturn SL2 engine light


Possible Causes
The following are malfunctions that could cause a rich condition:
^ Fuel pressure too high. Perform fuel pressure test.
^ Leaking fuel injector(s). - Perform pressure leak down test.
^ Vacuum leak around the MAP sensor grommet.
^ Oxygen sensor contamination.
^ Restricted exhaust or air intake.
^ Fuel Vapor Canister saturated with fuel.

IMPORTANT:
If the front oxygen reading voltage is above 600 mV and the rear HO2S is above 600 mV all the time, the O2 sensors are probably not
at fault.

Sep 22, 2009 | 1998 Saturn SL

1 Answer

Po133 code on 1999 durango


The sensor is about the same as 1 hour labor time at the dealer, the sensor will not in most cases be defective with this code, something else is causing this engine to run rich.

Mar 23, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

No acceleration


You have to replace the oxygen sensors, the engine computer adjusts the fuel/air mixture by reading the sensors...right now your engine is probably running very rich, which wastes a lot of fuel, and can also cause premature oil breakdown. O2 sensors usually require a special wrench to remove, so try a reliable local mechanic...

Jun 07, 2008 | 2003 GMC Yukon

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