Question about 1995 Ford F150 Styleside Regular Cab

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Problems that defective oxygen sensor can cause

Engine hesitates and surges when cold

Posted by Anonymous on

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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fastboyz
  • 674 Answers

SOURCE: oxygen sensor

no it wont cause it surg or jump
you might be able to fix it yourself but you need to get the codes

Posted on Nov 14, 2008

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wyatt1582
  • 453 Answers

SOURCE: 2002 taurus SEL-5 engine codes to go with light and problems

Cylinders 2, 3 have coil packs change out located on back of motor. you will have to take the upper intake off to get to them. Very easy to do. #2 center plug on back of motor #3 is on drivers side of motor. Crank sensor you will have to remove tire on car passenager side next look at crank pulley on left side of block you will se two wires the heat cover running to it.
Change these first it might correct the O2 sensor problem.

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

  • 3640 Answers

SOURCE: rough idle hesitating at idle drives fine i

check plugs, wires, and coils for proper spark.

Posted on Oct 29, 2009

  • 15 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 ford e-250 4.2 engine engine idle surges

Listen before you spend the money try a simple thing first. At our shop we start with the EGR solenoid, locate it, remove it, make sure that the ports are clear. Carbon build can cause your symptoms

Posted on Dec 15, 2009

leedavidian
  • 1420 Answers

SOURCE: Does a 1996 Ford Taurus 3.0 have a hot wire type

TheMobilian, Yes, the Mass Air Flow is a Hot Wire type. There is a spray made for the mass called mas air flow cleaner. Regular cab cleaner is too harsh and can eat the coating inside mass air flow and it's delicate parts. Use throttle bore foam cleaner; it works like bathroom scrubbing bubbles and eats the gum and varnish. When engine warms up (closed Loop) both sensors work together giving input to ecm for output. Have someone with a live data reader read both sensors. (Let me know the readings?)


Image Mass Air Flow(MAF)Sensor

PURPOSE

The Mas s Air flow (MAT) sensor measure s the amount of air flowing into the engine.

This value is used by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) in calculating the required

Fuel injector pulse within order to provide the desired air fuel ratio. This input can also

be used in determining Electronic Pressure Control (EPC). Shift and torque converter

clutch scheduling.

CONSTRUCTION

The MAE sensor is located directly in the airflow path between the air cleaner housing

and the throttle body. Ail air entering the intake manifold must pass through the sensor.

Located in the MAT sensor directly in the airstream are two platinum wires, a hot wire

heated by electrical current and a cold reference wire. The MAF sensor uses the air flow

across these wires to calculate its output.

OPERATION

The hot wire is maintained at 200CC (392CF) above ambient temperature as measured by

a constant cold *e. The current required to maintain the temperature of the hot wire is

proportional to the air mass flow. The MAE sensor then measures the amount of

electrical current required to maintain this temperature difference and converts this

value to an analog DC voltage. This output varies directly with the mass air flow rate.



Pay attention to the Paragraph about the torq converter.


Posted on Dec 20, 2010

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1 Answer

Oxygen sensor problem on mitsubishi outlander 2004


If the car has a check engine light on you may want to have the code checked, as this may point you in a direction as to what is causing this issue.

It could also be a bad EGR valve if the vehicle surges.

Hope this helps you out,
1aauto.com

Jul 10, 2012 | 2004 Mitsubishi Outlander

1 Answer

On my 2002 yukon 1500 I have trouble codes of 171,174, 420 what is my problem


Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in bank 2 detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 2 is generally the side of the engine that doesn't have cylinder #1.
Note: This DTC is very similar to P0171, and in fact your vehicle may show both codes at the same time.
You will more than likely not notice any drivability problems, although there may be symptoms such as a lack of power, detonation (spark knock), and/or a hesitation/surge on acceleration.
The catalytic converter has an oxygen sensor in front and behind it. When the vehicle is warm and running in closed loop mode, the upstream oxygen sensor waveform reading should fluctuate. The downstream O2 sensor reading should be fairly steady. Typically the P0420 code triggers the Check Engine Light if the readings of the two sensors are similar. This is indicative of (among other things) a converter that is not working as efficiently as it should be (according to specs). It is part of the vehicle emissions system.
I hope this helps.

Mar 31, 2012 | GMC Yukon XL Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 96 Old Ciera, feels like it's bucking/surging. More like hesitation while idling or driving. Has stalled a few times at stop signs, etc. Mechanic hooked up to computer, says bad egr and oxygen...


Had a similar problem that also caused the power brakes not to function. I believe there was a problem in the vacum fittings that was causing it to lose power but I am clearly not an expert.

Jan 07, 2011 | 1996 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

1 Answer

What is engine code P0171 for 2005 Toyota corolla?


What does that mean? Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in bank 1 detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 1 is the side of the engine that has cylinder #1.
Note: This DTC is very similar to P0174, and in fact your vehicle may show both codes at the same time.
Symptoms You will more than likely not notice any drivability problems, although there may be symptoms such as a lack of power, detonation (spark knock), and/or a hesitation/surge on acceleration.
Causes A code P0171 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
  • The MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor is dirty or faulty. Note: The use of "oiled" air filters may cause the MAF to become dirty if the filter is over-oiled. There is also an issue with some vehicles where the MAF sensors leak the silicone potting material used to protect the circuitry.
  • There could be a vacuum leak downstream of the MAF sensor.

Dec 08, 2010 | 2005 Toyota Corolla

2 Answers

Need a pic or diagram of location of Bank 2 sensor location on a 2004 Acura TL 3.2


Oxygen Sensor-I don't have a location of the Bank 2 sensor, so you'll have to guess on it by determining how many sensors you have by inspecting the exhaust system from the exhaust manifold down to the catalytic converter and past the catalytic converter which is downstream. Anything before the catalytic converter is upstream.
Do you have a code that describes which O2 sensor is not responding correctly?

Test/Replace
  • The sensor is threaded into the exhaust manifold.
  • It can be difficult to remove unless a special anti-seize compound is coated onto its threads.
  • Torque the sensor to 30 foot-pounds using a special socket.
  • A sensor that is too loose or a cracked exhaust manifold can result in a lean signal to the computer.
  • Check the vents in the thimble of a replacement O2 sensor.
  • There should be the same number of holes and they should face clockwise or counterclockwise like the ones on the original sensor.
  • Installing the wrong sensor can result in slower cross counts.

---
Operation
Although the oxygen sensor is termed a sensor, in actuality it is a galvanic battery. The oxygen sensor compares the potential difference between the ambient oxygen content around the exhaust and the oxygen content present in the exhaust stream. When the exhaust sample is lean, there is more oxygen in the exhaust as compared to the atmosphere. When the exhaust sample is rich, there is less oxygen content in the exhaust as compared to the atmosphere. The greater the difference between ambient oxygen and exhaust oxygen content, the greater the voltage produced.
For the oxygen sensor(s) to operate properly, it has to reach an operating temperature of approximately 600°F before a consistent voltage potential can be generated.
The Engine Management System (EMS) determines the state of readiness of the oxygen sensors by supplying a bias voltage of approximately 400 - 500mVDC to the oxygen sensor. As the sensor begins to warm up, the voltage produced increases due to rich exhaust mixtures commanded by the EMS. When the EMS senses a return voltage greater than the bias voltage, the computer will command the fuel mixture lean. When the output voltage from the sensor drops below bias voltage levels, the computer will command a rich mixture again. When the EMS determines that the O2 sensor has responded properly and within a predetermined amount of time, it will begin using the sensor as an input to adjust fuel trim.
Many Oxygen sensors used in OBD 2 engine management systems incorporate heaters. These heaters raise the sensors up to operating temperature quickly. The sooner the oxygen sensor gets to operating temperature, the sooner the EMS can maintain closer control over emissions, economy and performance. The oxygen sensor provides the computer with necessary information to maintain favorable operating conditions for the catalytic converter. The role of the catalytic converter is to store oxygen for the reduction of HC, CO and NOx emissions. The oxygen sensor input is used by the EMS to protect the catalytic converter by cycling the air/fuel mixture rich and lean. This provides adequate oxygen for storage while maintaining cool enough operating temperatures to prevent catalyst damage.
In addition to controlling the converters operating conditions for emissions control, the computer uses the oxygen sensors to tailor fuel trim providing a balance between fuel economy and performance.
Abnormal sensor activity has a profound effect on pulse-width and fuel trim strategies. Sensor values that indicate lean conditions will cause the computer to command changes in short term fuel strategies. Conditions such as secondary misfires create excessive HC levels. This also produces high oxygen levels in the exhaust. The oxygen sensor will sense only the increased oxygen content and input to the computer will be below bias voltage levels. The computer will respond by commanding additional fuel.
OBD 2 vehicles use oxygen sensors downstream of the converter(s) to monitor the efficiency of the catalyst. When the catalyst performs properly, available oxygen is used resulting in low levels oxygen in the exhaust sample. While downstream oxygen sensors are constructed the same as upstream oxygen sensors, the values that they generate are different. With relatively richer mixtures present around the downstream oxygen sensor, voltage inputs to the computer will be above the 450mV bias voltage. If the catalyst is operating effectively, the downstream oxygen sensor will cycle when the catalyst is flooded with oxygen. Typical values from the downstream oxygen sensor(s) are between 550- 900mV at idle.
While the downstream oxygen sensor is used to monitor catalyst efficiency, the upstream sensor has a pronounced effect on performance. Lean oxygen sensor values will result in an increase in pulse-width, excessive emissions, surging, hesitation, and potentially catalyst damage. Additional fuel can cause the catalyst temperatures to rise due to an afterburner effect in the converter. The oxygen sensor is the only post combustion input to the EMS. Other malfunctioning systems affect its operation.
Improper rich indications will cause lean operating conditions that may result in loss of power, hesitation, surging, poor idle quality and possibly converter damage. Sensors that do not switch properly, or are lazy do not provide accurate information to allow the computer to properly maintain the air/fuel mixture. Faulty heaters do not allow the sensors to reach operating temperature fast enough and the vehicle may remain in open loop for longer periods of time. Malfunctioning heaters also allow the sensors to cool down during periods of extended idle.
A faulty oxygen sensor due to loose connections, bad grounds, high resistance in the circuit, or opens in the circuit can cause the following symptoms.
Related Symptoms
  • Surging at idle
  • Unstable idle
  • Running rough off idle
  • Hesitation
  • Stumble
  • Chuggle
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Spark knock
  • Stalling on acceleration
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Oct 15, 2010 | 2004 Acura TL

2 Answers

Buick regal 92 3.8L Horrible fuel mileage


Sounds like you might have an oxygen sensor problem. Your catalytic converter(s) maybe defective or dirty. That in turn can dirty up the oxygen sensor. A defective oxygen sensor will send faulty info to the computer, interpreting the fumes as cold (even when the engine warms up). That causes the computer to adjust the fuel mixture to very rich, giving you poor gas mileage and the fuel smell. Hope it helps.

Mar 16, 2010 | 1992 Buick Regal

1 Answer

I have a 1990 Mitsubishi eclipse with a 1.8, what is going on is it will not cold start you have to rev the engine to keep it from dieseling out this takes about 15 to 20 mins when it is warmed up it...


The long warm up suggests the thermostat has failed and is stuck open. The hard cold start is commonly caused by a faulty coolant temp sensor or the wiring connector on it. The idle surging can often be fixed by disassembling the throttle body and cleaning out the carbon build up. Be aware that the throttle body idle control box also has some internal gears that strip, also causing surge.

Dec 26, 2017 | 1990 Mitsubishi Eclipse

3 Answers

1996 Astro AWD 4.3L V6 308,000Km engine hesitation/surging


tsb remove dist cap ,clean out breather holes i replaced cap and rotor at the same time. chevy has the problem with the 4.3l astro,s and blazer i have both.fixed the problem when buying the cap and rotor the directions inside will also tell you how to fix

Nov 23, 2009 | 1997 Chevrolet Astro

1 Answer

Intermitant cold start misfire


Most likely none are related to the computer. Surging idle is often a sign of a vacuum leak and can cause random misfires. Vacuum leak would also cause hesitation. Sensor heater can be a fuse, wiring or bad sensor. What's the window doing?

Aug 23, 2017 | 2001 Dodge Caravan

1 Answer

Problem bad hesitation when cold


You should change all 4 O2 sensors, it will run better :)

Also check your compression. Not enough compression on any one cylinder will cause oil blow-by and cause it to fail emissions. Also, the EGR valve can cause the same symptoms.

Sep 13, 2009 | 1997 Chevrolet K1500

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