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What is the valve order so i know when im tdc on power stroke for timing on a 94 jetta

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 2,101 Answers

Just make sure the number 1 piston is up and intake valvw is open and exhaust is closed

Posted on Dec 02, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: 1985 jetta diesel timing

The procedure is given in the Hayes manual. You need to turn the cam shaft gear so that the front valves (two valves close to the gear point up) are close and the notch on the cam shaft other end is horizonal (side facing the battery). You need to bring the flywheel (in bellhousing) to top dead center (you will see a notch on flywheel and a fixed pointer on the bellhousing. The notch should be in line with the ponter. After that, you need to bring the injection pump at certain pisition. Then you can mount the belt. It is not a difficult process, I have been doing it, but you need certain tools that will make it easy, such as cam lock position tool, injection pump lock pin, gear remover, etc.

Posted on Oct 17, 2008

michaelcanto
  • 76 Answers

SOURCE: Need timing marks 94 jetta 1.9l diesel any thoughts?

The timing marks are stamped into the steel pulley and flywheel and there should be a pointer attached to the engine. Degreasing the engine with GUNK and power washing it should uncover them.

I'm pretty sure it's crucial to have the engine timed to TDC as it relates to the end of compression/beginning of power stroke, and NOT the end of exhaust stroke.

With gas engines I do the following, to determine the TDC, by removing the #1 plug and insert a long straw, while turning the motor by hand watch for the maximum height of the straw, this will give you a TDC but knowing if its on the exhaust or compression stroke can only be determined if you were watching the closure of the intake valve indicating the begining of the next power stroke. Once you have this set look for the timing marks again. if you can't find them pick up a service manual at the library or autoparts store for photos and instructions.

Also check this site: http://forums.vwvortex.com

Posted on Jul 26, 2009

bbbman78
  • 680 Answers

SOURCE: After timing belt failure/head swap, how to tell a

I'd be careful as you know that is a zero clearance engine. Pull #1 spark plug after you get everything lined back up. Make sure it's all the way up and on the compression stroke. With #1 cam lobe up the valve should be closed and seated in the head. #1 piston should not be interfering with the valve lash. Mark the belt, cam gears, and crank clearly. This way when you pull the belt off, you can line the marks back up at any time and you won't lose any ground. What you can do is to pull the plugs and watch the cam lobes. If you have one going down, and a piston coming up...bingo that's your problem cylinder. Here's a tip from an old timer. Make sure the block timing isn't 180 degrees out. After you mark the belt and gears. Remove the belt and spin the crank 180. This will let you move the cam to close the valve on the problem cylinder while doing it. What you're experiencing is a timing issue. Figure out what that is and then line everything back up and you'll be back on the salt flats in no time. I'd be willing to bet that something is 180 degrees out no more tear down involved, just proper alignment.

Posted on Mar 07, 2010

BCAS1298
  • 3092 Answers

SOURCE: 94 nissan pathfinder. 3.0V6. timing belt change,

Hope this help's you.2632ba3.gif

Posted on Jun 28, 2010

ldtrisch
  • 83 Answers

SOURCE: i need to find a

Hope this helps!!!
ldtrisch_4.jpg

Posted on Mar 17, 2011

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1 Answer

How do I know the heads are in alighnment with tdc on compression stroke


the heads are fixed in position with head studs and have nothing to do with tdc or compression stroke. You are probably referring to valve timing. explain what you are doing so that a more definite answer can be given. Are you working on the timing belt/chain ,distributor,firing order. what make of engine ,model car year etc all helps when you want help.

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After top dead center what valve starts opening number 1 intake or number 1 exhaust?


It depends on which TDC you are talking about, compression TDC or exhaust TDC. On the compression stroke, no valves will open after TDC-this is when combustion has occured, the power stroke. When the piston reaches bottom and starts up on the exhaust stroke, then exhaust valve will open. At TDC of exhaust stroke, exhaust valve will be closed, and the intake valve will then open as piston is moving down.
If you have the intake valve opening right after TDC, you are on the exhaust stroke of that cylinder. The exhaust valve is only open during upward movement of the piston on the exhaust stroke. Immediately after TDC of exhaust stroke, the intake will open as the piston travels downward.

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Hello I have a 1987 dodge lancer and im having problems starting it it seems when I turn it over it shoots gas out the top. I checked the spark and there all good I just did the timming on it and all it...


Sounds like timing may be off. Recheck your procedure. Did you change the timing belt?

I would start by putting crankshaft to the zero point on scale-TDC on the compression stroke. Crankshaft will be at zero, TDC, twice; on the compression stroke and on the exhaust stroke. To find the compression stroke, pull the spark plug on number 1, with finger over hole, turn crank by socket until you feel pressure against your finger. Now turn the crank (clockwise) until it is at the zero mark-TDC of compression stroke. Pull off the distributor cap-rotor should be pointing at number 1 plug wire tower-Is it?
If good so far, look for inspection rubber plug to check camshaft timing mark on cam sprocket, OR pull the valve cover off and check the number 1 cylinder camshaft lobes that open the valves-both lobes, intake and exhaust, should be away from the valves. Valves should both be closed on number 1.
Post back with what you find. Good luck.

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Step by step instructions on timing belt installation 2000 hyundai accent


Right, so you have two TDC's-the exhaust stroke and the compression stroke Top Dead Center-and both occurr when the crank hits the zero mark on the timing scale.
Always set timing with the number one cylinder at TDC on the compression stroke. How do you know which is which? If you have a distributor, the rotor will be pointing to number one cylinder tower, when at TDC of the compression stroke. If you are on the exhaust stroke's TDC, the rotor will be pointing just opposite of number one .
If you don't have a distributor, look at the valves for cylinder one under the valve cover. If at TDC of compression stroke, both valves will be closed. At TDC of exhaust stroke, the exhaust valve will be open.
You can also find the compression stroke on number one by pulling out the spark plug for number one, and either put a wrench or socket on the crank pulley and turn it clockwise, or use the starter and bump the engine over in short bumps. Put your finger or thumb over the spark plug hole and feel for the pressure to build up. As soon as you feel pressure on your finger, (if turning by hand, pressure will be slight, but you can feel it) you are on the compression stroke. Stop bumping the starter and turn the crank on around by hand until the zero mark lines up on the timing scale-TDC of compression stroke! The exhaust stroke will have no pressure build-up as the piston comes to top-because the exhaust valve is open. On the compression stroke, both valves are closed as the piston travels up the cylinder.

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1 Answer

Corolla 1.6 VVTI motor the 3ZZFE motor: the timing marks are on TDC as well as cam timing as manual illustrated - on which piston will the inlet valve open and exhausted valve open?


With engine Crankshaft on TDC and cam timing set correctly this is the position where No. 1 cylinder is firing at the start of the power stroke. At this point No. 4 cylinder is also at TDC but is just at the end of the exhaust stroke and starting the intake stroke so the exhaust valve will be almost finished closing and the inlet valve will just be starting to open. This is referred to as the inlet and exhaust valves rocking.

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My crank shaft is rotating twise the crank shaft. HOW MY 1342 FIRING WILL OCCURE?, I can spare only 30 digree for charge and spark plug contact. THERE ARE ONLY 2+2 CYLINDER. 180 DIGREE APPART KINDLY REPLY...


Your crankshaft turns 2x times the camshaft. Put it this way as # 1 cylinder reaches TDC (top dead center) of the firing/compression stroke, and this will be after a (8 degs BTDC) spark to ignite the air/fuel mix, the # 3 cyl. will be at BDC of the intake stroke and as #1 begins its power down stroke, (during explosion of air/fuel mix), #3 begins its compression up stroke, the #4 cyl. will be coming down with #1 cyl. but #4 will be in the beginning of its intake down stroke, and #2 cyl. will be coming up with #3 but #2will be in its BDC of the exhaust stroke. Which has just fired previously to #1. 1342134213421342 etc. Now the cam turns to open / close the valves; In the outline above, #1 cyl. valves will both be closed. #3 cyl. will have the intake starting to close at this point. #4 cyl. will just be starting to open its intake valve, and #2 will be starting to open its exhaust valve. Is all this clear as mud? So as the crank makes one full rotation (in a 4cyl. engine) only the firing of one cylinder has happened.and at every rotation one cyl. will fire. So #1 at TDC then one full rotation, #1 back at TDC, but this TDC is half of its 4 cycles, (1)Intake, (2)compression, (3)power, (4)exhaust. this 1234 refers to the 4 cycles of the rotation not firing order.

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1 Answer

1994 jetta gl need timing marks location


Hi, the timing marks are stamped into the steel pulley and flywheel and there should be a pointer attached to the engine. Degreasing the engine with GUNK and power washing it should uncover them.

I'm pretty sure it's crucial to have the engine timed to TDC as it relates to the end of compression/beginning of power stroke, and NOT the end of exhaust stroke.

With gas engines I do the following, to determine the TDC, by removing the #1 plug and insert a long straw, while turning the motor by hand watch for the maximum height of the straw, this will give you a TDC but knowing if its on the exhaust or compression stroke can only be determined if you were watching the closure of the intake valve indicating the begining of the next power stroke. Once you have this set look for the timing marks again. if you can't find them pick up a service manual at the library or autoparts store for photos and instructions.

Also check this site: http://forums.vwvortex.com
Take care

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1 Answer

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Either the camshaft are seriously out of time or the piston rings/pistons are worn out.
Check TDC of Piston No1 on the power stroke coincides with both inlet and exhaust valves being closed.

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You said you did to specs but if that was the case the valves would not be open at tdc.
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Note:
Izuzu engines are very picky and if the marks are not correct after turning over two rotations as stated in the book it will not run.
(im also taking that this is the v6SOHC engine)

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Need timing marks 94 jetta 1.9l diesel any thoughts?


You can go to the library and look at a book or check it out there for your car a haynes or chiltons manual or if you want you can buy it at a autoparts store or go online to http.www.alldatadiy.com and purchase an online book, I got in trouble for giving out these pictures, as I was not the copyright holder so those are your choices.

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