Question about 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

Water / coolant leaking from behind engine block.

I visually tried to view where the leak was.. slid under the vehicle and tried to look up from beneath. all I could see was trickling liquid running along the block down to the ground.. couldnt see any hoses leaking or punctures or spraying water.. Not sure if item was a water pump close to me or not but it appeared if it was it was above that part.. is there a soft plug or something like that above that could have started a leak? The motor has starting running warm to the 3/4 mark of hot..on gauge. Have had the red icon showing low fluid in radiator or container light up.. then go off.. have filled up the reservor and kept the cap loose as not to push the coolant out fast.. is this bad for this system.. However last night I started the car up .. plenty of water in reservoir drove couple blocks.. car warmed up but no heat ..then heat..then light came on then no heat then heat.. then a funny noise.. like a pencil tapping an inside plastic container for a couple taps.. got home a few blocks away.. checked the engine.. checked fluid added some while engine running.. then turned off motor.. any ideas about this leaking situation.?

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1 Answer

Lets hope you can find & fix the leak

I think the noises are just air,that will go away
once you fix & fill the system

Leave the cap on- so it can draw back coolant
at night -when engine cools

Posted on Dec 01, 2012

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 14036 Answers

SOURCE: 1999 Olds Alero 4 cyl running hotter than normal.

REPLACE THERMOSTAT.ITS STICKING CLOSE TO KEEP COOLANT FROM CIRCULATING THROUGH ENGINE AND RADIATOR. THE FANS SHOULD COME ON WHEN VECHICLE SETTING AT A LONG IDLE.THE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR GET TO CERTAIN TEMPERATURE WHICH WILL COMPLETE CIRCUIT PCM SEND POWER TO COOLANT SENSOR THEN TO COOLANT FANS RELAYS AND FANS.IF VECHICLE OVER HEATING WHILE MOVING THERMOSTAT FAULTY.IF YOU TURN AC AND COOLANT FANS DONT RUN CHECK COOLANT FANS FUSE AND RELAY.IF COOLING FANS DONT TURN ON WITH AIR CONDITIONER ON EITHER COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR FAULTY OR PCM FAULTY.IF ALL LOOKS GOOD.IF ENGINE OIL LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE.YOU HAVE BLOWN HEAD GASKET.

Posted on Nov 12, 2010

Testimonial: "This was all checked and fixed. You are right however the downpour of the radiator fluid out of the overflow tank area said it was the water pump. "

  • 7353 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 2000 Olds Silhouette that keeps running

That engine is FAMOUS for the intake manifold gaskets to leak. Does it run hot all the time or only when its low on coolant. When its hot and the fans are on, is the air coming through the radiator HOT? it should be, if its not HOT or LUKE WARM, the radiator isnt flowing coolant. Make sure the water pump isnt leaking. The thermostat is a pain to replace, so make shure its bad before replacing it. Does it run hot sitting still or going down the highway? If it cools on the road, check the cooling fans. They only work when the a/c is on OR till the engine is approx 230f or so.

Posted on Nov 20, 2009

  • 59 Answers

SOURCE: My 1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette started overheating

you cant use water to fillied that can damaged the waterpump you need the special antifrezze for this van check the radiator hose

Posted on Oct 14, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 1998 aurora

I have had this problem with my 98 aurora and have replaced all the same components. Temp gauge routinely shows 200 on highway (Fine) but in the city in stop and go will get to around 245. I installed a switch to manually turn on the cooling fans by connecting the ground to pin 86 in the relay for the fan(s). Otherwise the fans will not turn on to 245. This fix works but would like to know an actual solution.

Posted on Jul 12, 2008

Thunder55
  • 318 Answers

SOURCE: no heat just warm air

I think you are on top of your problem,,you dont need any one elses advice.
Complete rebuild of the cooling and heating system,, simple.

Posted on Jan 19, 2009

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1 Answer

Coolant is evaporating, & there's no leaks


If you are losing coolant in a modern automobile at any significant rate of loss, then there most certainly IS a leak. The most common source of undetected leakage is from a worn out water pump. Many newer cars have their water pump concealed in the area of the timing belt. Here the coolant leaks out and evaporates on the engine block before there is any ability to visually detect it. Even older cars that have external pumps have "weep holes" under the drive pulley to provide early detection of impeding failure. Often, however, these leaks also evaporate on the engine before detection as many of these pumps are hidden well behind and under other components. Water pumps also have the "magic" ability to not leak when the engine stops rotating, even while there is still pressure in the cooling system, so you rarely get any coolant puddling under the vehicle to give away the problem. If the vehicle has more than 70K miles and has never had the water pump replaced, that is probably the first thing I would check out.

Aug 26, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Possibility of a cracked block. how can i be sure/


Vehicles: Any with the above symptoms

A cracked cylinder block will cause either:
(a) motor oil contamination of engine coolant
(b) coolant contamination of motor oil
(c) white exhaust smoke, due to coolant seeping into one or more cylinders.
(d) more than one of the above
(e) all of the above

Oil infiltrating into coolant is easy to see - drain some coolant out through the pepcock at the bottom of the radiator, and place it into a styrofoam coffee cup. Oil droplets floating on top of the green (or orange) coolant are easily seen. Or visualize oil by looking into the top of the radiator through the radiator cap.
Coolant infiltrating into and mixing with motor oil will permanently damage the engine (seizing it up through loss of lubrication), and must be prevented.
A leak from above the front suspension is, as physicians like to put it, "nonspecific", with the most likely cause a water pump seal or hose/hose connection.
A leak from near the fire wall will usually be a heater core hose, or hose connection.
A coolant leak on the same side of the engine as the water pump is a leaking water pump or water pump seal until proven otherwise.

To rule out everythng else, here's the 1999 Honda CR-V Troubleshooting Guide for Coolant Loss/Coolant Leaking:

Priority Action Part Type Cause
1 Inspect Water Pump - Worn, Cracked or Leaking Water Pump, or Water Pump gasket.
2 Inspect Head Gasket - Leaking Head Gasket.
3 Inspect Radiator - Leaking Radiator Hose(s).
4 Inspect Radiator Cap - Worn or Damaged Radiator Cap.
5 Inspect Radiator Hose - Ruptured, Cracked or Leaking Radiator Hose.
6 Inspect Freeze Plug - Leaking Freeze Plug(s).
7 Inspect Intake Manifold Gasket - Leaking, Worn, or Damaged Intake Manifold Gasket.
8 Inspect Water Outlet - Cracked, Leaking or Damaged Water Outlet.
9 Inspect Heater Control Valve - Leaking or Faulty Heater Control Valve.
10 Inspect Radiator Drain Pepcock - Loose, Damaged, or Faulty Radiator Drain Pepcock, or Pepcock O-ring.
11 Inspect Engine (DOMESTIC ONLY) - Cracked Cylinder Block Leaking Coolant into at least one Cylinder, causing white exhaust smoke.

Dec 03, 2011 | 1999 Honda CR-V

1 Answer

I hve water leaking from the rear of my engine on my 98 expedition


Hello moltn, quite often people completely fill their coolant reservoir, ( the plastic bottle with the cap that says, " coolant " ), If you haven't already, make sure that the coolant level in the reservoir isn't over the FULL line. When it is overfilled, and the engine runs for a few minutes, the heat builds some pressure and forces the extra coolant out through an overfill hose. That overfill hose usually drains, on the ground, in the general area your leak is comming from.
If that is NOT the problem;

Next, we need to find out if it leaks all the time, or, if it only leaks under pressure, ( when the engine is running and warmed up ).

Start the vehicle just long enough to back it up 2 or 3 feet and then turn the engine back off. Raise the hood and visually inspect the area where you seem to leaking from. Allow about 10 minutes and then look to see if you have a new puddle under the vehicle.

If it's a non-pressure leak, you should be able to spot it right away, most likely a loose hose clamp, If so, first look closely at the condition of the hose, if it looks okay go ahead and tighten the clamp, ( you often only need about 1 full turn on the screw/nut that tightens the clamp.)
As rubber hoses age they lose some of their integrity, so clamp should be checked atleast every six months.

If you find nothing leaking, it is likely a pressure leak that is often the result of the engine and coolant reaching their operating temperature and as they do the heat builds perssure and will usually force coolant out of any weak links in the cooling system.

Let the engine run 6 to 8 minutes to allow the vehicle to get to its normal operating temperature.
Look at your temperature gauge, your needle should be about in the middle. Go back and look in the engine compartment again and visually inspect for signs of leaks. You should be able to locate any pressure leaks at this point. As before, if you locate the leak, and it is at a hose, do a good visual inspection of the hose, and the clamp.

Good luck my friend!

Jan 16, 2011 | 1998 Ford Expedition

4 Answers

Loosing coolant no visible leaks about 1/2 gallon every 100 miles


How To Find & Fix Coolant Leaks

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WHERE COOLANT LEAKS OCCUR
Coolant leaks can occur anywhere in the cooling system. Nine out of ten times, coolant leaks are easy to find because the coolant can be seen dripping, spraying, seeping or bubbling from the leaky component. Open the hood and visually inspect the engine and cooling system for any sign of liquid leaking from the engine, radiator or hoses. The color of the coolant may be green, orange or yellow depending on the type of antifreeze in the system. The most common places where coolant may be leaking are:
Water pump -- A bad shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.

Radiator -- Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, especially on aluminum radiators with plastic end tanks. On copper/brass radiators, leaks typically occur where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. Internal corrosion caused by old coolant that has never been changed can also eat through the metal in the radiator, causing it to leak.

Most cooling systems today are designed to operate at 8 to 14 psi. If the radiator can't hold pressure, your engine will overheat and lose coolant.

Hoses -- Cracks, pinholes or splits in a radiator hose or heater hose will leak coolant. A hose leak will usually send a stream of hot coolant spraying out of the hose. A corroded hose connection or a loose or damaged hose clamp may also allow coolant to leak from the end of a hose. Sometimes the leak may only occur once the hose gets hot and the pinhole or crack opens up.

Freeze plugs -- These are the casting plugs or expansion plugs in the sides of the engine block and/or cylinder head. The flat steel plugs corroded from the inside out, and may develop leaks that are hard to see because of the plug's location behind the exhaust manifold, engine mount or other engine accessories. On V6 and V8 blocks, the plugs are most easily inspected from underneath the vehicle.

Heater Core -- The heater core is located inside the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit under the dash. It is out of sight so you cannot see a leak directly. But if the heater core is leaking (or a hose connection to the heater core is leaking), coolant will be seeping out of the bottom of the HVAC unit and dripping on the floor inside the passenger compartment. Look for stains or wet spots on the bottom of the plastic HVAC case, or on the passenger side floor.

Intake Manifold gasket -- The gasket that seals the intake manifold to the cylinder heads may leak and allow coolant to enter the intake port, crankcase or dribble down the outside of the engine. Some engines such as General Motors 3.1L and 3.4L V6 engines as well as 4.3L, 5.0L and 5.7L V8s are notorious for leaky intake manifold gaskets. The intake manifold gaskets on these engines are plastic and often fail at 50,000 to 80,000 miles. Other troublesome applications include the intake manifold gaskets on Buick 3800 V6 and Ford 4.0L V6 engines.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS
There are the worst kind of coolant leaks for two reasons. One is that they are impossible to see because they are hidden inside the engine. The other is that internal coolant leaks can be very expensive to repair.

Bad head gasket --Internal coolant leaks are most often due to a bad head gasket. The head gasket may leak coolant into a cylinder, or into the crankcase. Coolant leaks into the crankcase dilute the oil and can damage the bearings in your engine. A head gasket leaking coolant into a cylinder can foul the spark plug, and create a lot of white smoke in the exhaust. Adding sealer to the cooling system may plug the leak if it is not too bad, but eventually the head gasket will have to be replaced.

If you suspect a head gasket leak, have the cooling system pressure tested. If it fails to hold pressure, there is an internal leak. A "block tester" can also be used to diagnose a leaky head gasket. This device draws air from the cooling system into a chamber that contains a special blue colored leak detection liquid. Combustion gases will react with the liquid and cause it to change color from blue to green if the head gasket is leaking.

Head gasket failures are often the result of engine overheating (which may have occurred because of a coolant leak elsewhere in the cooling system, a bad thermostat, or an electric cooling fan not working). When the engine overheats, thermal expansion can crush and damage portions of the head gasket. This damaged areas may then start to leak combustion pressure and/or coolant.

Cracked Head or Block -- Internal coolant leaks can also occur if the cylinder head or engine block has a crack in a cooling jacket. A combustion chamber leak in the cylinder head or block will leak coolant into the cylinder. This dilutes the oil on the cylinder walls and can damage the piston and rings. If the coolant contains silicates (conventional green antifreeze), it can also foul the oxygen sensor and catalytic converter. If enough coolant leaks into the cylinder (as when the engine is sitting overnight), it may even hydro-lock the engine and prevent it from cranking when you try to start it. Internal leaks such as these can be diagnosed by pressure testing the cooling system or using a block checker.

A coolant leak into the crankcase is also bad news because it can damage the bearings. Coolant leaking into the crankcase will make the oil level on the dipstick appear to be higher than normal. The oil may also appear frothy, muddy or discolored because of the coolant contamination.

Leaky ATF oil cooler -- Internal coolant leakage can also occur in the automatic transmission fluid oil cooler inside the radiator. On most vehicles with automatic transmissions, ATF is routed through an oil cooler inside the radiator. If the tubing leaks, coolant can enter the transmission lines, contaminate the fluid and ruin the transmission. Red or brown drops of oil in the coolant would be a symptom of such a leak. Because the oil cooler is inside the radiator, the radiator must be replaced to eliminate the problem. The transmission fluid should also be changed.

continue...

Mar 12, 2010 | 1998 Oldsmobile 88

1 Answer

Loosing antifreeze


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WHERE COOLANT LEAKS OCCUR
Coolant leaks can occur anywhere in the cooling system. Nine out of ten times, coolant leaks are easy to find because the coolant can be seen dripping, spraying, seeping or bubbling from the leaky component. Open the hood and visually inspect the engine and cooling system for any sign of liquid leaking from the engine, radiator or hoses. The color of the coolant may be green, orange or yellow depending on the type of antifreeze in the system. The most common places where coolant may be leaking are:
Water pump -- A bad shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.

Radiator -- Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, especially on aluminum radiators with plastic end tanks. On copper/brass radiators, leaks typically occur where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. Internal corrosion caused by old coolant that has never been changed can also eat through the metal in the radiator, causing it to leak.

Most cooling systems today are designed to operate at 8 to 14 psi. If the radiator can't hold pressure, your engine will overheat and lose coolant.

Hoses -- Cracks, pinholes or splits in a radiator hose or heater hose will leak coolant. A hose leak will usually send a stream of hot coolant spraying out of the hose. A corroded hose connection or a loose or damaged hose clamp may also allow coolant to leak from the end of a hose. Sometimes the leak may only occur once the hose gets hot and the pinhole or crack opens up.

Freeze plugs -- These are the casting plugs or expansion plugs in the sides of the engine block and/or cylinder head. The flat steel plugs corroded from the inside out, and may develop leaks that are hard to see because of the plug's location behind the exhaust manifold, engine mount or other engine accessories. On V6 and V8 blocks, the plugs are most easily inspected from underneath the vehicle.

Heater Core -- The heater core is located inside the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit under the dash. It is out of sight so you cannot see a leak directly. But if the heater core is leaking (or a hose connection to the heater core is leaking), coolant will be seeping out of the bottom of the HVAC unit and dripping on the floor inside the passenger compartment. Look for stains or wet spots on the bottom of the plastic HVAC case, or on the passenger side floor.

Intake Manifold gasket -- The gasket that seals the intake manifold to the cylinder heads may leak and allow coolant to enter the intake port, crankcase or dribble down the outside of the engine. Some engines such as General Motors 3.1L and 3.4L V6 engines as well as 4.3L, 5.0L and 5.7L V8s are notorious for leaky intake manifold gaskets. The intake manifold gaskets on these engines are plastic and often fail at 50,000 to 80,000 miles. Other troublesome applications include the intake manifold gaskets on Buick 3800 V6 and Ford 4.0L V6 engines.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS
There are the worst kind of coolant leaks for two reasons. One is that they are impossible to see because they are hidden inside the engine. The other is that internal coolant leaks can be very expensive to repair.

Bad head gasket --Internal coolant leaks are most often due to a bad head gasket. The head gasket may leak coolant into a cylinder, or into the crankcase. Coolant leaks into the crankcase dilute the oil and can damage the bearings in your engine. A head gasket leaking coolant into a cylinder can foul the spark plug, and create a lot of white smoke in the exhaust. Adding sealer to the cooling system may plug the leak if it is not too bad, but eventually the head gasket will have to be replaced.

If you suspect a head gasket leak, have the cooling system pressure tested. If it fails to hold pressure, there is an internal leak. A "block tester" can also be used to diagnose a leaky head gasket. This device draws air from the cooling system into a chamber that contains a special blue colored leak detection liquid. Combustion gases will react with the liquid and cause it to change color from blue to green if the head gasket is leaking.

Head gasket failures are often the result of engine overheating (which may have occurred because of a coolant leak elsewhere in the cooling system, a bad thermostat, or an electric cooling fan not working). When the engine overheats, thermal expansion can crush and damage portions of the head gasket. This damaged areas may then start to leak combustion pressure and/or coolant.

Cracked Head or Block -- Internal coolant leaks can also occur if the cylinder head or engine block has a crack in a cooling jacket. A combustion chamber leak in the cylinder head or block will leak coolant into the cylinder. This dilutes the oil on the cylinder walls and can damage the piston and rings. If the coolant contains silicates (conventional green antifreeze), it can also foul the oxygen sensor and catalytic converter. If enough coolant leaks into the cylinder (as when the engine is sitting overnight), it may even hydro-lock the engine and prevent it from cranking when you try to start it. Internal leaks such as these can be diagnosed by pressure testing the cooling system or using a block checker.

A coolant leak into the crankcase is also bad news because it can damage the bearings. Coolant leaking into the crankcase will make the oil level on the dipstick appear to be higher than normal. The oil may also appear frothy, muddy or discolored because of the coolant contamination.

Leaky ATF oil cooler -- Internal coolant leakage can also occur in the automatic transmission fluid oil cooler inside the radiator. On most vehicles with automatic transmissions, ATF is routed through an oil cooler inside the radiator. If the tubing leaks, coolant can enter the transmission lines, contaminate the fluid and ruin the transmission. Red or brown drops of oil in the coolant would be a symptom of such a leak. Because the oil cooler is inside the radiator, the radiator must be replaced to eliminate the problem. The transmission fluid should also be changed.

continue..

Mar 12, 2010 | 2007 Hummer H3X

2 Answers

Py 1997 plynouth voyager is leaking antifreeze could it be freeze plugs and where are they


They are called CORE plugs as when they are made they take out all the sand out of the holes and fit in plugs.But if your leaking water out and cannot find it then yes its a core plug... as all summer you use coolant min 20%,Winter coming on 20% Antifreeze. and soon as winter is finished you should flush out the engine and radiator as Antifreeze causes the block to go rusty as its cast iron and the core plugs must be BRASS not steel because antifreeze eats away the plugs
But the plugs are fitted 1Rear of engine behind the flywheel 3 either side of engine block and some times 3 or 4 in the heads under the rocker gear..
Let me know how you get on .. Ron

Nov 11, 2009 | 1997 Plymouth Voyager

1 Answer

How do you know if your mazda3 2004 water pump leak


Park your car overnight and put a large white piece of paper underneith your car. In the morning check the paper. If the paper is wet with liquid, you could have a water pump leak.

If the paper has green (in most cases) fluid on it, there is a good chance your vehicle is leaking coolant (sometimes refered to as "water"). In many cases, when you are leaking coolant it could be coming from the water pump.

Grab opposite ends of the water pump pulley and check for "play" (looseness): Try to rock it back and forth. There should be no give. If there is, the bearings are going and it's time to replace the water pump. By the time you can feel play in the water pump pulley, you may also be able to hear the bad bearing when the engine is running - there may be a low-pitched grinding noise coming from the water pump pulley

Visually check the water pump (it's located behind the pulley) for signs of a coolant leak. If the water pump gasket is leaking, it must be replaced. This is a good time to get a new water pump, too, unless it was just recently replaced.

Nov 04, 2009 | 2004 Mazda 3

1 Answer

Coolant leak behind bottom pulley


Could be water pump weephole leak or water pump gasket under water pump trailing down timing cover and exiting behind crank pulley or water . Worse case, leak in timing cover. Water crosses through timing cover to and from water pump to engine block.

Oct 16, 2009 | Nissan Pickup Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Coolant level


could be coolant leak possibly water pump common for that car. how many miles. think t-belt and water pump. Would be better to do both. or coolant leak from coolant flange on left side of engine under the plastic covers pull covers off both top one and smaller side one you will be able to see coolant flange from that view. look for pinkish or white trail on block below the flange or if you can look on the right side of engine from under car to see if there is a trail on that side on the right side it will be leaking water pump.

Sep 02, 2009 | 2001 Audi TT

2 Answers

My daughter's 1997 Saturn is leaking coolant and overheating..


Coolant leaks can occur anywhere in the cooling system. Nine out of ten times, coolant leaks are easy to find because the coolant can be seen dripping, spraying, seeping or bubbling from the leaky component. So open the hood and visually inspect the engine and cooling system for any sign of liquid leaking from the engine, radiator or hoses. The color of the coolant may be green, orange or yellow depending on the type of antifreeze in the system. The most common places where coolant may be leaking are:Water pump. A bead shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.Radiator. Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, as is the area where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. But a major factor in many radiator leaks is internal corrosion that eats away from the inside out. That's why regular coolant flushes and replacing the antifreeze is so important.
oses. Cracks, pinholes or splits in a radiator hose or heater hose will leak coolant. A hose leak will usually send a stream of hot coolant spraying out of the hose. A corroded hose connection or a loose or damaged hose clamp may also allow coolant to leak from the end of a hose. Sometimes the leak may only occur once the hose gets hot and the pinhole or crack opens up. Freeze plugs (casting plugs or expansion plugs in the sides of the engine block and/or cylinder head). The flat steel plugs corroded from the inside out, and eventually eat through allowing coolant to leak from the engine. The plugs may be hard to see because they are behind the exhaust manifold, engine mount or other engine accessories. On V6 and V8 blocks, the plugs are most easily inspected from underneath the vehicle.
Heater Core. The heater core is located inside the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit under the dash. It is out of sight so you can�t see a leak directly. But if the heater core is leaking (or a hose connection to the heater core is leaking), coolant will be seeping out of the bottom of the HVAC unit and dripping on the carpet. Look for stains or wet spots on the bottom of the plastic HVAC case, or on the passenger side floor.
Intake Manifold gasket. The gasket that seals the intake manifold to the cylinder heads may leak and allow coolant to enter the intake port, crankcase or dribble down the outside of the engine. Some engines such as General Motors 3.1L and 3.4L V6 engines as well as 4.3L, 5.0L and 5.7L V8s are notorious for leaky intake manifold gaskets. The intake manifold gaskets on these engines are plastic and often fail at 30,000 to 80,000 miles. Other troublesome applications include the intake manifold gaskets on Buick 3800 V6 and Ford 4.0L V6 engines.
INTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS
There are the worst kind of coolant leaks for two reasons. One is that they are impossible to see because they are hidden inside the engine. The other is that internal coolant leaks can be very expensive to repair.


visit for more info:

http://www.aa1car.com/library/coolant_leaks.htm

Nov 24, 2008 | 1996 Saturn SL

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