Question about Ford Mustang

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Could a bad PCM be intermittant before completely going out or could the fuel pump be bad causing the low voltage to the PCM and consequently causing a sensor to keep fuel from flowing to the engine?

I have a 1999 Mustang v6 3.8L and112,000 miles that cranks but won't start. The first time it did it I noticed that I couldn't hear the fuel pump engaging as is normal when I turn the key to the on position. My fuel was rather low but not low enough for the low fuel light to come on but I added 2 gallons of fuel anyway. As a matter of fact the Check Engine Light has only come on when the key is turned to on position only and then goes off like normal. The car still would crank but not start. The next day I tried to start it again and the fuel pump engaged and it started so I drove around the neighborhood and even shut it off and it did start again. I drove it 6 miles and came home and parked it. Several days passed and I went to start it but again I noticed that the fuel pump is not engaging and it only cranks and will not turn over. I put obd2 code reader on it and the only code that comes up is P1633 indicating P1633 - Keep Alive Power Voltage Too Low which indicates that the (KAPWR) circuit has experienced a power interrupt. Open KAPWR circuit; Damaged PCM; Intermittent KAPWR Circuit.

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THE FUEL PUMP COULD BE GOING BAD NOT PUTTING ENOUGH FUEL PRESSURE TO THE MOTOR AND THE FUEL PUMP RELAY COULD BE BAD

Posted on Nov 30, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: 1999 dodge ram 1500 2wd 5.2L gives different intermittent codes

pcm posably but i think i would look at the grounds from the battery to body and bat to engine

Posted on Jan 28, 2010

saailer
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SOURCE: Code P0342 - Chevy Aveo Sedan 2006. Last 2 months, when starts the car engine getting

Hello! The trouble code is telling us that the voltage to the Camshaft Positioning Sensor (CMP) is low...The connector that plugs into the sensor could be open, the sensor itself defective or low battery input to the sensor...See diagrams below as to sensor location...Lets eliminate...The wire colors in the CMP plug are...Pink...Black/White...And Light Blue/Black...If you connect a voltmeter to the Pink wire you must read 5 volts...Push a safety pin into the rear of the in-place connector into the Pink wire so it contacts the pin that the wire is crimped to...(+) probe of meter clipped to that pin and (-) probe to bare metal chassis ground...Key on...Meter set to read 5 volts...If 5 volts is present that eliminates a battery fault...Next push the safety pin into the Light Blue/Black wire...Turn on key...(+) probe to that pin...Should read about 2.4 volts...If you read nothing, or less than 1 volt the sensor is defective OR the connector pins to it are fouled...Pull plug and inspect both male/female pins for oil...corrosion...etc...Radio Shack sells a product called DeOxit...It's the best (no touch) spray contact cleaner...Send results...PS...Best meter to use is a digital one...$20...Guru...saailer
Remove engine cover:
2_25_2012_9_59_32_am.gif
CMP at top of drawing with timing chain cover removed for clarity...

Posted on Feb 25, 2012

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Error code p1041 and p1047 02 chrysler sebring lxi 2.7L


Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1041 Saab: Injector Cylinder 4 Shorting To Ground

There is no definition for DTC P1047

CodeDescription P1192 Inlet Air Temp. Circuit Low P1193 Inlet Air Temp. Circuit High P1195 1/1 O2 Sensor Slow During Catalyst Monitor P1196 2/1 O2 Sensor Slow During Catalyst Monitor P1197 1/2 O2 Sensor Slow During Catalyst Monitor P1198 Radiator Temperature Sensor Volts Too High P1199 Radiator Temperature Sensor Volts Too Low P1281 Engine Is Cold Too Long P1282 Fuel Pump Relay Control Circuit P1283 Idle Select Signal Invalid P1284 Fuel Injection Pump Battery Voltage Out Of Range P1285 Fuel Injection Pump Controller Always On P1286 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor Supply Voltage Too High P1287 Fuel Injection Pump Controller Supply Voltage Low P1288 Intake Manifold Short Runner Solenoid Circuit P1289 Manifold Tune Valve Solenoid Circuit P1290 CNG Fuel Pressure Too High P1291 No Temp Rise Seen From Fuel Heaters P1292 CNG Pressure Sensor Voltage Too High P1293 CNG Pressure Sensor Voltage Too Low P1294 Target Idle Not Reached P1295 No 5 Volts To TP Sensor P1296 No 5 Volts To MAP Sensor P1297 No Change in MAP From Start To Run P1298 Lean Operation At wide Open Throttle P1299 Vacuum Leak Found (IAC Fully Seated) P1388 Auto Shutdown (ASD) Relay Control Circuit P1389 No Auto Shutdown (ASD) Relay Output Voltage At PCM P1390 Timing Belt Skipped One Tooth or More P1391 Intermittent Loss of CMP or CKP P1398 Mis-Fire Adapter Numerator at Limit P1399 Wait To Start Lamp Circuit P1403 No 5 Volts To EGR Sensor P1475 Aux. 5 Volt Output Too High P1476 Too Little Secondary Air P1477 Too Much Secondary Air P1478 Battery Temp Sensor Volts Out of Limit P1479 Transmission Fan Relay Circuit P1480 PCV Solenoid Valve P1482 Catalyst Temperature Sensor Circuit Shorted Low P1483 Catalyst Temperature Sensor Circuit Shorted High P1484 Catalytic Converter Overheat Detected P1485 Air Injection Solenoid Circuit P1486 Evap Leak Monitor Pinched Hose P1487 Hi Speed Rad Fan CTRL Relay Circuit P1488 Auxiliary 5 Volt Supply Output Too Low P1489 High Speed Fan CTRL Relay Circuit P1490 Low Speed Fan CTRL Relay Circuit P1491 Rad Fan Control Relay Circuit P1492 Battery Temperature Sensor Voltage Too High P1493 Battery Temperature Sensor Voltage Too Low P1494 Leak Detection Pump Switch or Mechanical Fault P1495 Leak Detection Pump Solenoid Circuit P1496 5 Volt Supply Output Too Low P1498 High speed Rad Fan Ground CTRL Rly Circuit P1594 Charging System Voltage Too High P1595 Speed Control Solenoid Circuits P1596 Speed Control Switch Always High P1597 Speed Control Switch Always Low P1598 A/C Pressure Sensor Volts Too High P1599 A/C Pressure Sensor Volts Too Low P1602 PCM Not Programmed P1680 Clutch Released Switch Circuit P1681 No I/P Cluster CCD/J1850 Messages Received P1682 Charging System Voltage Too Low P1683 Speed Control Power Relay Or Speed Control 12 Volt Driver Circuit P1684 Battery Disconnected Within Last 50 Starts P1685 Skim Invalid Key P1686 No SKIM Bus Message Received P1687 No Cluster Bus Message P1688 Internal Fuel Injection Pump Controller Failure P1689 No Communication Between ECM & Injection Pump Module P1690 Fuel injection pump CKP Sensor Does Not Agree With ECM CKP Sensor P1691 Fuel Injection Pump Controller Calibration Failure P1693 DTC Detected In ECM Or PCM P1694 No CCD Messages Received From ECM P1695 No CCD/J185O Message From BCM P1696 PCM Failure EEPROM Write Denied P1697 PCM Failure SRI Mile Not Stored P1698 No CCD Messages Received From PCM P1719 Skip Shift Solenoid Circuit P1740 TCC Or OD Solenoid Performance P1756 Governor Pressure Not Equal To Target At 15?20 PSI P1757 Governor Pressure Above 3 PSI When Request Is 0 PSI P1762 Governor Pressure Sensor Offset Improper Voltage P1763 Governor Pressure Sensor Voltage Too High P1764 Governor Pressure Sensor Voltage Too Low P1765 Trans 12 Volt Supply Relay Control Circuit P1899 Park/Neutral Position Switch Stuck In Park or In Gear

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Jul 26, 2015 | Chrysler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I replaced my secondary air check valve on my 2001 chevy tahoe but code 1416 still comes up. what else can i check


here is what i found on p1416.



P1416 Chevrolet
P1416 Chevrolet - Secondary Air Injection System Bank 2
Possible causes
- Faulty Secondary Air Injection (AIR) pump
- Secondary Air Injection check valve bank 2
- Secondary Air Injection (AIR) pump electrical circuit fault
- Blocked Secondary Air Injection (AIR) system

When is the code detected?

The P1416 code is set when no O2 sensor voltage change is detected by the Engine Control Module (ECM).


Possible symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)


P1416 Chevrolet Description
An Secondary Air Injection (AIR) pump is used on this vehicle to lower tail pipe emissions on start-up. The PCM supplies a ground to the AIR pump relay, which energizes the AIR pump. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) monitors the HO2S voltages to diagnose the AIR system. During the AIR test the PCM activates the AIR pump during closed loop operation. When the AIR is activated, the PCM monitors the HO2S voltages and short term fuel trim values for both banks of the engine. If the AIR system is operating properly, the HO2S voltages should go low and the short term fuel trim should go high.

Jan 23, 2014 | 2001 Chevrolet Tahoe

1 Answer

1999 Gmc Sierra 4.8L cranks/No Start Using snap-on Solus Scanner. I followed basic diagnostics: Checked fuses- good Pulled PCM and BCM codes- none No spark and no fuel. No ignition power to fuel...


Did you check your CKP and CMP power wires for a short to ground? Short to ground up stream might be pulling the voltage low from the PCM. Also.. have you pulled up the underhood fuse block just to see if there's any rodent damage to the wiring under there? That's a pretty common spot for rodents to cause problems.

Oct 03, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

P0107 gm code


What does that mean?

The Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor responds to changes in the intake manifold pressure (vacuum). 5 Volts is supplied to the sensor from the PCM (powertrain control module). Inside the MAP sensor is a resistor that moves in relation to manifold pressure. The resistor varies the voltage between about 1 volt to 4.5 volts (depending on engine load) and that voltage signal is returned to the PCM to indicate manifold pressure (vacuum). This signal is essential for the PCM to determine fuel delivery. A P0107 DTC is set when the PCM sees that the MAP signal voltage is less than .25 volts which is too low.
FB.init("dd7d9e9681341cde77587bc6a2029f6f"); OBD-Codes.com on Facebook Potential Symptoms

Anytime the MAP sensor signal is low the vehicle will likely have a very difficult time starting. Other symptoms may include:

  • Hard to start
  • Long cranking times
  • Sputtering/missing
  • Blowing black smoke
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Dies intermittently
  • MIL(Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
Causes

The causes of a low MAP sensor signal circuit (P0107) could be any of the following:

  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Open or short in the signal circuit
  • Open or short in the 5 Volt reference circuit
  • Ground circuit open or shorted
  • Bad PCM

Jun 22, 2012 | 2008 Pontiac G6

1 Answer

I SCANNED MY MALIBU & GOT A P0108 WHAT CAN I DO TO RESOLVE THIS PROBLEM


It could just be a bad signal from the MAP sensor or a poor connection at the sensor. Or a bad MAP sensor itself. Maybe the vacuum line is off or broken.

Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor measures the changes in the intake manifold pressure which result from engine load and speed changes, and converts this measurement into a voltage output.

A closed throttle on when the engine is decelerating would produce a relatively low MAP output, while a wide open throttle would produce a high output. Manifold absolute pressure is the opposite of what you would measure on a vacuum gage. When manifold pressure is high, vacuum is low. The MAP sensor is also used to measure barometric pressure under certain conditions, which allows the PCM to automatically adjust for different altitudes.

The PCM sends a 5 volt reference signal to the MAP sensor. As the manifold pressure changes, the electrical resistance of the sensor also changes. By monitoring the sensor output voltage, the PCM can determine the manifold pressure. A higher pressure, low vacuum (high voltage) requires more fuel, while a lower pressure, higher vacuum (low voltage) requires less fuel.

A high or low voltage fault in the MAP sensor circuit should set a DTC P0107 or DTC P0108. If the MAP sensor sends an intermittent zero voltage signal to the PCM, a DTC P0106 will set.

Oct 13, 2010 | 1998 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Where could I find a list of Fault Codes for my 3.3 Litre Voyager?


CHRYSLER OBDII DTC

P1101 HCM/PCM Communication Performance

P1103 Turbocharger Waste Gate Actuator Malfunction

P1104 Turbocharger Waste Gate Solenoid Malfunction

P1105 Fuel Pressure Solenoid Malfunction

P1195 Slow Switching O2 Sensor Bank One Sensor One During catalyst monitoring

P1196 Slow Switching O2 Sensor Bank two Sensor one During catalyst monitoring

P1197 Slow Switching O2 Sensor Bank One Sensor two During catalyst monitoring

P1198 Radiator Temperature Sensor Input voltage too high

P1199 Radiator Temperature Sensor Input voltage too low

P1281 Engine is cold too long

P1282 Fuel Pump Relay control circuit

P1283 Idle select signal invalid

P1284 Fuel Injection pump battery voltage sensor out of range

P1285 Fuel Injection pump controller always on

P1286 Accelerator Position Sensor (APPS) supply voltage too high

P1287 Fuel Injection pump Controller Supply voltage low

P1288 Intake manifold short runner tuning valve solenoid circuit

P1289 Manifold tune valve solenoid circuit

P1290 CNG Fuel system pressure too high

P1291 No Temp rise seen from intake heaters

P1292 CNG Pressure sensor voltage too high

P1293 CNG Pressure sensor voltage too low

P1294 Target idle not reached

P1295 No 5 volts to TP sensor

P1296 No 5 volts to MAP sensor

P1297 No change in MAP sensor from start to run

P1298 lean operation at wide open throttle

P1299 Vacuum Leak detected (IAC fully seated)

P1300 Ignition timing adjustment circuit failure

P1388 Auto shutdown relay control circuit

P1389 No ASD relay output voltage at PCM

P1390 Timing belt skipped one tooth or more

P1391 Intermittent loss of CMP or CKP

P1398 Mis-Fire Adaptive Numerator at Limit (PCM is unable to learn the crank sensors signal

for use in preparation for misfire diagnostics

P1399 Wait to start lamp circuit

P1403 No 5 volt feed to EGR

P1475 Auxiliary 5 volt supply is too high

P1476 Too little secondary air

P1477 Too much secondary air

P1478 Battery Temp Sensor Volts out of limit

P1479 Transmission Fan Relay Circuit

P1480 PCV Solenoid Circuit

P1481 EATX (Electronic Automatic Transaxle) RPM pulse generator performance

P1482 Catalyst Temperature Sensor Circuit shorted low

P1483 Catalyst Temperature Sensor Circuit shorted high

P1484 Catalytic Converter overheat detected

P1485 Air injection solenoid circuit

P1486 EVAP Leak Monitor found a pinched hose

P1487 Hi Speed Fan #2 Circuit

P1488 Auxiliary 5 volt supply output is too low

P1489 High speed fan control relay circuit

P1490 Low speed fan control relay circuit

P1491 Radiator fan relay control circuit

P1492 Ambient/ Battery Temp sensor input voltage too high

P1493 Ambient/ Battery Temp sensor input voltage too low

P1494 Leak detection pump pressure switch or mechanical fault

P1495 Leak detection pump solenoid circuit

P1496 5 volt supply, output too low

P1498 High speed radiator fan ground control relay circuit

P1500 General alternator 'FR' Terminal circuit fault

P1594 Charging system voltage too high

P1595 Speed control solenoid circuits

P1596 Speed control switch always high

P1597 Speed control switch always low

P1598 A/C pressure sensor input voltage too high

P1599 A/C pressure sensor input voltage too low

P1680 Clutch released switch circuit

P1681 No I/P Cluster CCD/ J1850 messages received

P1682 Charging system voltage too low

P1683 Speed control servo power control circuit

P1684 The battery has been disconnected within the last 50 starts

P1685 The SKIM (Smart Key Immobilizer Module) has received an invalid key

P1686 No SKIM (Smart Key Immobilizer Module) bus message received

P1687 No Mechanical Instrument cluster bus message

P1688 Internal Fuel injection pump controller failure

P1689 No communication between the ECM and injection pump module

P1690 Fuel injection pump CKP sensor does not agree with the ECM CKP sensor

P1691 Fuel injection pump controller calibration error

P1692 Fault in companion Engine control module

P1693 A companion DTC was set in both the ECM and PCM

P1694 No CCD message from PCM- Aisin transmission

P1695 No CCD message from body control module

P1696 PCM failure EEPROM write denied

P1697 PCM Failure SRI (Service Reminder Indicator) mileage not stored

P1698 No CCD message from TCM

P1719 Skip shift solenoid circuit

P1740 TCC solenoid or overdrive solenoid performance

P1756 Governor pressure not equal to target at 15-20 psi

P1757 Governor pressure is above 3 PSI when 0 PSI is requested

P1762 Governor pressure sensor offset improper voltage

P1763 Governor pressure sensor voltage to high

P1764 Governor pressure sensor voltage to low
P1765 Transmission 12 volt supply relay control circuit

Oct 03, 2010 | 1998 Plymouth Voyager

1 Answer

My mechanic told me my P0107 is possibly bad. Is this located in the same location as the P0108


P0107 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Low Input

The Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor responds to changes in the intake manifold pressure (vacuum). 5 Volts is supplied to the sensor from the PCM (powertrain control module). Inside the MAP sensor is a resistor that moves in relation to manifold pressure. The resistor varies the voltage between about 1 volt to 4.5 volts (depending on engine load) and that voltage signal is returned to the PCM to indicate manifold pressure (vacuum). This signal is essential for the PCM to determine fuel delivery. A P0107 DTC is set when the PCM sees that the MAP signal voltage is less than .25 volts which is too low.

Potential Symptoms: Anytime the MAP sensor signal is low the vehicle will likely have a very difficult time starting. Other symptoms may include:
* Hard to start
* Long cranking times
* Sputtering/missing
* Blowing black smoke
* Poor fuel economy
* Dies intermittently
* MIL(Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination

Causes: The causes of a low MAP sensor signal circuit (P0107) could be any of the following:
* Bad MAP sensor
* Open or short in the signal circuit
* Open or short in the 5 Volt reference circuit
* Ground circuit open or shorted
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: First, using a scan tool with the Key on and engine running, monitor the MAP sensor voltage. If it is reading less than .5 volts, turn engine off, unplug the MAP sensor and, using a DVOM (Digital Volt/Ohm Meter) check for 5Volts on the 5 Volt reference circuit.

1. If there is not 5 Volts on the reference circuit, then check for the reference voltage at the PCM connector. If it is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, repair the open in the reference circuit between the PCM and MAP harness connector. If 5 Volt reference is NOT present at the PCM connector, check powers and grounds of PCM and repair/replace as needed. (NOTE: On Chrysler products, a shorted Crank sensor, Vehicle speed sensor or any other sensor that utilizes the 5 Volt reference from the PCM can short out the 5 Volt reference. To fix simply unplug each sensor one at a time until the 5 Volt reference reappears. The last sensor unplugged is the shorted sensor.)

2. If you have a 5 Volt reference at the MAP connector, jumper the 5 volt reference circuit to the signal circuit. Now check the MAP voltage on the scan tool. It should be 4.5 to 5 Volts. If it is, replace MAP sensor. If not, repair open/short in the signal circuit wiring and re-check.

3. If all appears okay, perform a wiggle test. Start engine and manipulate the harness, connector and tap on the MAP sensor. Note any changes in voltage or engine speed. Repair connector, harness, or sensor as needed.

4. If the wiggle test checks out, use a vacuum pump (or just use your lungs) to draw a vacuum on the MAP sensor vacuum port. As you add vacuum the voltage should decrease. With no vacuum, the MAP sensor should read approximately 4.5 volts. If there is no change in MAP sensor reading on the scan tool, replace MAP sensor.

MAP Sensor DTC's: P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109.

Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

Aug 06, 2010 | 1997 Chevrolet Venture

1 Answer

I have a 1998 v 6 dodge dakota sport with a p1495 trouble code how do i fix it


DTC P1495 - Leak Detection Pump Solenoid Circuit

WHEN MONITORED: Immediately after a cold start, with battery/ambient temperature between 4.4 °C (40 °F) . F and 32 °C (90 °F) . Coolant temperature within -12 °C (10 °F) of battery/ambient

SET CONDITION: The state of the solenoid circuit does not match the PCM's desired state.

POSSIBLE CAUSES:
* Wiring Harness Intermittent
* Leak Detection Pump
* Fused Ignition Switch Output
* LDP Solenoid Control Circuit Shorted To Ground
* LDP Solenoid Control Circuit Open
* PCM

Leak Detection Pump System
The evaporative emission system is designed to prevent the escape of fuel vapors from the fuel system. Leaks in the system, even small ones, can allow fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere. Government regulations require on-board testing to make sure that the evaporative (EVAP) system is functioning properly. The leak detection system tests for EVAP system leaks and blockage. It also performs self-diagnostics. During self-diagnostics, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) first checks the Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for electrical and mechanical faults. If the first checks pass, the PCM then uses the LDP to seal the vent valve and pump air into the system to pressurize it. If a leak is present, the PCM will continue pumping the LDP to replace the air that leaks out. The PCM determines the size of the leak based on how fast/long it must pump the LDP as it tries to maintain pressure in the system.

SYMPTOM: P1490-LOW SPEED FAN CONTROL RELAY CIRCUIT
WHEN MONITORED: With the ignition ON. Battery voltage greater than 10 volts .

SET CONDITION: An open or shorted circuit is detected in the radiator fan relay control circuit.

POSSIBLE CAUSES:
* Low Speed Radiator Fan Relay Intermittent Operation
* Intermittent Condition
* Fused Ignition Switch Output Circuit
* Low Speed Radiator Fan Relay Resistance
* Low Speed Radiator Fan Relay Control Circuit Open
* Low Speed Radiator Fan Relay Control Circuit Short To Ground
* PCM


Notes
The Transmission/Transaxle Controller monitors the malfunction of sensors and actuators relating to Transmission/Transaxle Control. If any malfunction is detected, they inform the PCM by sending a signal - By illuminating the MIL and by setting the P0700 code.

P0700 means that a code has been set in the Transmission/Transaxle Controller. If P0700 is present, check for Transmission/Transaxle codes.

Hope helps (remember comment and rated this).

Aug 02, 2010 | Dodge Dakota Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

1989 dodge dynasty. Cutting out while driving it. Then when I press the excellarator it acts like it isn't getting fuel. Then suddenly it works fine. Mechanic cleaned the throttle body and replaced the ASD...


I had this issue last summer. it turned out to be a weak fuel pump. Or more specifically the check valve in the fuel pump. It will buck and carry on when you goose it.

Let it sit after you have run it for a while and the fuel pressure bleeds off. (it is supposed to stay up around 30PSI). When this happens, because of the low pressure and the heat in the engine compartment the fuel will boil in the fuel rail causing a vapor lock. The engine may start after spinning a long while, but will want to cut out if you touch the accelerator. Have your mechanic put a fuel pressure guage on it. it should be up there, like I say, around 30PSI or better when the engine is running. It should hold that when it is shut off. If it bleeds down right away, replace the fuel pump. Took me a long time to figure out what was happeneing on mine.

Apr 15, 2009 | 1989 Dodge Dynasty

1 Answer

I'm getting check engine light on my dash, and it tells me that its code P0106. how do i fix this and what is it?


This info coutesy of OBD-II codes.com

Potential Symptoms The following could be symptomatic of a P0106:
  • Engine runs rough
  • Black smoke at tailpipe
  • Engine will not idle
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Engine misses at speed
Causes A P0106 could be caused by:
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Water/dirt intrusion affecting MAP sensor connector
  • Intermittent open in the reference, ground, or signal wire for the MAP sensor
  • Intermittent short in the reference, ground, or signal wire for the MAP sensor
  • Ground problem due to corrosion causing intermittent signal problem
  • Bad PCM (do not assume the PCM is bad until you've exhausted all other possibilities).
Possible Solutions Using a scan tool, watch the MAP sensor value with the key on, engine off. Compare the BARO reading with the MAP reading. They should be roughly equal. The voltage for the MAP sensor should read approx. 4.5 volts. Now start the engine and look for a significant drop in the MAP sensor voltage indicating the MAP sensor is working.
If the MAP reading doesn't change perform the following: 1. With the Key on, engine off, disconnect the vacuum hose from the MAP sensor. Using a vacuum pump, pull 20 in. of vacuum on the MAP sensor. Does the voltage drop? It should. If it doesn't inspect the MAP sensor vacuum port and vacuum hose to manifold for a restriction of some kind. Repair or replace as necessary. 2. If there are no restrictions, and the value doesn't change with vacuum, then perform the following: with the Key on and engine off and the MAP sensor unplugged, check for 5 Volts at the reference wire to the MAP sensor connector with a Digital Voltmeter. If there is none, check for reference voltage at the PCM connector. If the reference voltage is present at the PCM connector but not the MAP connector, check for open or short in the reference wire between MAP and PCM and retest. 3. If reference voltage is present, then check for existing ground at the MAP sensor connector. If it isn't present then repair open/short in the ground circuit. 4. If ground is present, then replace MAP sensor.

Jan 22, 2009 | Ford Freestyle Cars & Trucks

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