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My volvo truck coolant tank is transffering the coolant to the resovoir and it seem to build pressure.?

I replace the thermostat ,radiator ,and the coolant tank ...

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 95 Answers

SOURCE: Radiator blockage?

I believe you have a head gasket blown or a cracked head. When you start it up COLD with the cap off, it would push water out immediately. Fill it with plain water and try this. It might not be a bad idea to perform a pressure test too. Also check for antifreeze in the oil. It will get milky looking and might even be over full. If this happens after warm-up, you may just have a plugged radiator. Have it professionally cleaned. The water pump vanes could also possibly be corroded off and it's not effectively displacing coolant. Hope this helps.

Posted on Aug 16, 2009

stormbrewin
  • 426 Answers

SOURCE: Coolant filling up overflow bottle

You may need to ask AAA to put a radiator pressure tester on the resevoir bottle and pump it up to operating pressure(Pressure cap rating) and see if it over pressurises while it is running at operating temp,rev engine up and down and watch what the testers pressure readings do,it should move up and down in sync with the water pump.If the pressure keeps building i would have to believe that combustion chamber gases are over pressurising your cooling system.Also test the pressure cap is functioning within factory specs.

Posted on Oct 30, 2008

onyeredson
  • 404 Answers

SOURCE: 04' Passat Overheating

Hi!
It appears we have an Air lock scenario and you will need to perform a system Bleed.
Park the vehicle on level ground, when cold remove coolant filler cap, start engine and leave to idle, turn heater on full and blower to max. When engine reaches operating temperature watch and listen near coolant filler, keep clear as gurgling and hopefully a boil over should occur. Top up with very warm coolant and wait as it may do it again.
Check for heat inside vehicle if warm replace coolant cap but keep an eye on temperature gauge as the ~Air lock may have moved on from heater matrix/core so proceedure needs to be carried out again from COLD.
If persistent boil ups/over attention must made in the cylinder head
or gasket area, or possibly water pump?
Please press the Blue button to appraise my FREE Efforts, Thank You!
Paul 'W' U.K.

Posted on Mar 02, 2009

  • 42 Answers

SOURCE: Coolant Leak in 2005 S80 at the Radiator - biodegradable V Cars?

Is the bicycle for when your german car breaks down? PS the plastic radiator tanks, are of a recyclable plastic, go figure!

Posted on Jul 19, 2009

  • 12 Answers

SOURCE: Overheating Fiero

well fieros are very different cars you need to fill collent in a speical way so air doesnt get in the lines most fiero owners do not know this but it very important The best way to tell it is for wikipedia
Cooling system issues
With an already hot normal operating temperature of 220 °F (104 °C) prior to the recall switching to a 195 °F (91 °C) thermostat, the mid-mounted engine utilized long pipes to carry coolant to the front-mounted radiator. This demanded that a special coolant filling procedure be followed to prevent severe overheating. Simply pouring coolant into the thermostat housing (on the engine) would leave an air bubble in the radiator, while adding coolant just to the radiator would leave an air bubble in the engine's coolant passages. Proper procedure (with engine idling and the thermostat removed, filling the thermostat housing, burping the bubble out of the radiator by cracking open the radiator cap until coolant exits) must be followed in order to ensure an air-free cooling system.
A second problem has become common as more Fieros are being serviced by shops unfamiliar with their design. The under-body coolant tubes are positioned in such a way that a casual glance beneath the car will not suggest their fragility. As a result, many have been crushed by shop lifts, resulting in a near complete lack of engine cooling. The age of the car means that even GM dealerships may now be unaware of the proper jacking methods.
Lastly, the absence of a spare tire (at the front of the car, right behind the radiator) could have an effect on coolant system performance. i dont know who wrote this and i dont take credit for it

Posted on Nov 19, 2009

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4 Answers

I replaced water pump, thermostat and radiator. My heat works fine, but the car still seems to be running hot. There is steam coming from the container that says "coolant only" any ideas why?


if you say there is steam coming from the "coolant only" overflow reservoir, then the first thing I'd inspect is the integrity of this overflow coolant tank. if you believe the cap is in working condition, take a careful look at the tank itself. so as to rule out any cracks or deformities which may compromise this parts ability to build and retain the necessary pressure for the cooling system to operate in the manner for which it was designed. hope this helps!

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1 Answer

Does a blown head gasket cause pressure build up in a surge tank


could be a air pockets in the coolant system that have top bled out
it is a simple exercise to have a compression test done to check for head gasket or cracked head

Mar 14, 2017 | 1999 Cadillac DeVille

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Water keeps coming out of my resavor when it starts to heat up


from what you describe either a bad radiator cap, or a leak in the small hose going to the resovoir,or the line within the resovoir tank is to short or missing,this is whats happening,engine warms up to a point that the cooling system is building pressure,the radiator cap has a set presure release to it you might see the figure direcly on top of the radiator cap, 12-14 lbs rated. it usualy will read something like that, so as that warming engine builds pressure in the cooling system it will eventualy surpass the rating of the radiator cap ,and out it goes and flows in that small line to the overflow resovoir. now when the engine cools back down it now will create a vaccum and should draw that water back from the resovoir to the radiator,but if the hose or hardline that is usualy integral within the resovoir is bad cracked or missing, it would be the same as trying to drink a soda through a straw,but the straw is not inserted below the surface of liquid.or if the straw was cracked, no fluid can be vaccumed up through the straw, the resovoir works on that same principle, it must have a good unobstructed line from radiator to the resovoir,and the line inside the resovoir should go nearly to the bottom of the tank, so the water can be vaccume syphoned out just as drinking a soda with a straw.so check to be sure the line is all good no obstructions,no cracks, and that there is a line that continues within the resovoir tank almost to the bottom as well and it is in good shape as well. last check that radiator cap to make sure the rubber as well the upper gasket portion are still there and not cracked/dryrotted. if all that is in good working order then your radiator should be able to recover the water back.just like sippin a soda through a good straw

Jul 05, 2012 | Chevrolet Malibu Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

My 2000 dodge caravan is overheating and my overflow tank is literally overflowing. I have no leaks in radiator or hoses. Could it be my waterpump or thermostat or just a clogged hose.


Yes, it could be a few issues, I always believe to go the cheapest route first, so you are not just replacing parts to be replacing, Based on your description, Normally it would not be overflowing if your pump is not working, It could be a clogged hose, you would have to flush system to see if that was the case, but based on my feeling, i believe it is a stuck thermostat, If your tank is overflowing, it would have to be a main hose block, but i don't believe that is the case, i would have thermostat replaced, to confirm that, for a around 50 bucks (if you stay away from dealer) you can have the radiator flushed, which is a good idea anyway, then you will know for sure it is the thermostat, and they can put that in after they flush it, or you can put thermostat in, pick there brain, when they flush it, and they can point where it is, it is just a couple of bolts to take off, clean gasket area, replace with new gasket, after of course taking old thermostat out and replacing with new one.

I hope this helps you, (again, i think it is thermostat that is stuck) thanks Mike from fixya
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Jul 23, 2011 | 2000 Dodge Caravan

2 Answers

The radiator keeps throwing out all the water from the resovoir, why? everytime i put water or the cooler fluid and i use da car and turn it off all the water leaks out through the resovoir.


Hi,
Engine cooling is a team effort, ie; radiator , coolant fan , thermostat , hoses etc . You need to change the coolant thermostat (cheap ) to elliminate any coolant problems (pressure), the rest is just water managenent ! ! It's not a leak and I feel a replacement coolant thermostat will answer your prayers ! The enging only has to overheat ONCE to have a serious bill at the end of all the guess work. Good Luck

Dec 12, 2010 | 2002 Ford Escape

1 Answer

1995 Volvo 850 Overheating


head gasket is blown

Apr 26, 2010 | 1995 Volvo 850

1 Answer

2001 volvo s440 1.9t


Volvo Radiator, Thermostat and Sensors Your cooling system's temperature controls include all coolant temperature sensors, Volvo thermostat, Volvo radiator or expansion tank cap, cooling fan(s) and fan clutch (if equipped). These cooling system parts function primarily independent of the engine but control the engine either through cooling or by sending control signals to your Volvo's electronic systems.
The Volvo thermostat is a spring-loaded valve that opens and closes based on the temperature of the coolant flowing through it. A high temperature reading followed by a drop to normal temperature (or a continuously low temperature) is a common first sign of a sticking Volvo thermostat. However, many other conditions may cause these symptoms, so you need to know how to eliminate each possibility.
The Volvo radiator or expansion tank cap is also a spring-loaded valve reacting to system pressure. It serves to maintain proper system coolant level at predetermined pressures. It must always be replaced with an exact replacement cap with the same pressure setting. Never use other caps except for short-term emergencies!
A belt-driven fan blade for pulling air through the Volvo radiator is usually on the Volvo water pump pulley and should have a fan clutch to control it. The fan clutch allows the fan to turn with the belt at low engine speed and "free-wheel" at higher speeds. A bad fan clutch either doesn't allow the fan to spin at low speed (overheating in traffic) or doesn't allow it to free-wheel at high speed (potential overheating on highway or reduced gas mileage).
An electric fan can be either by itself (usually front-wheel drive) or auxiliary (used with a mechanical fan). Both types are controlled via a temperature sensor - in the Volvo radiator or upper Volvo radiator hose or on the Volvo thermostat or Volvo water pump housing. This sensor is usually an on/off type switch with a fixed temperature setting. (Some vehicles may have 2-3 settings for multi-speed fans.) This sensor is commonly called an "auxilliary fan switch".
Other common temperature sensors are: 1) gauge sender (variable output); 2) warning light sender (on/off type); 3) lambda and/or fuel injection sensor(s) (variable to control fuel injection settings); 4) thermo-time switch (cold start valve control). Your Volvo may have other sensors as well.
Temperature control is critical to both performance and emission control. Unfortunately, this system is the most difficult to troubleshoot without proper equipment and diagrams. It's even more difficult with computers that adjust timing, idle speed, vacuum and fuel delivery automatically to make up for potentially faulty temperature sensor signals.
Maintenance of your cooling system sensors is virtually impossible since there's nothing really to "maintain". Keeping them clean both internally (coolant replacement) and externally (engine cleaning) is the best way to ensure trouble-free driving. Checking and replacing all parts at the factory-recommended time or mileage limits helps as well

Jul 23, 2009 | 2001 Volvo S40

1 Answer

Water leak from top of expansion tank.2000 BMW 316i se


The water (coolant) in the expansion tank will rise and fall with the engine temperature. What the expansion tank does is collect and return coolant to and from the engine. When the engine warms up the coolant gets hot, builds up pressure and opens up the radiator cap. The coolant then goes into the expansion tank. Now when the engine cools down the pressure drops in the cooling system and the pressure drop (vacuum) pulls the coolant back into the engine via the radiator cap. The radiator cap allows the cooling system to build up pressure and by doing so increases the boiling point of the coolant, but when that pressure exceeds the caps rating the cap opens and the coolant goes to the expansion valve. The cap has another part to it that when the engine cools down and a partial vacuum is created in the cooling system a "valve" in the radiator cap opens and allows the coolant to be drawn back into the engine. I would look at your radiator cap to see if any gunk or build up is on it, and check the rubber gaskets for cracks. It's easiest just to replace the cap because they are inexpensive and easy to replace (2-10 dollars). The expansion tank should have two hoses on it. The one on the bottom comes from the radiator and the one on the top (possibly part of filler cap) runs down and is open to the ground. That way if it is overfilled or becomes overfilled it will slowly leak onto the ground. When and if you change your radiator cap, make sure the engine is cooled down, remove cap and start engine and turn heater to full blast, full heat. Leave the cap off and let it run until engine warmed up. This should burp out any air pockets that may have happened when coolant was changed. Also top off the coolant in the radiator while it is running. Hope this helps and good luck

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