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Nissan murano knock sensor reset

Have an 06 murano with about 55000 miles that i bought recently. And not knowing i did used 87 octane fuel and started to get the knock in the engine only under load or accelerating not when idling or in neutral. right away i switched to 91 octane and used so far two tanks but still hear the knock. My question is how long it will take for the knock sensor to detect and switch back? Is there are anyway that i can restart the sensor? By the as soon as you drive the vehicle for longer time like 30 min the knock goes away or it's still there but its not that loud at all . Please help with this thanks

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SOURCE: 2003 Nissan Murano - Fuel problems - knocking sound

If the knocking did not go away with the higher octane fuel then you may have other problems. A dirty fuel injector oor a misfiring spark plug can also cause knocking in a modern car. A faulty sensor may also be causing the wrong fuel / air mixture in the cylinder... check out the cheapest fixes first.

Posted on Sep 15, 2010

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Which octane is recommended for my infinti g35


yes....87 is perfectly fine and should be used all of the time with confidence. The higher octane fuels can sometimes help with a knocking engine but are mostly used for higher end vehicles.

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Tip

Octane Myth


What is octane? Octane cannot be seen, but it is of utmost importance when it comes to gasoline. One thing for sure, higher octane fuel costs more. Allot more! Simply put, octane is a measure of gasoline's ability to resist detonation, which you hear as pinging and knocking in your engine. The higher the octane the more the fuel can be compressed without detonating before you want it to. Detonation, ping, knock, whatever you want to call it, occurs when the air/fuel mixture ignites before the spark plug fires. The mixture ignites from compression and not from the flame of the spark plug. In other words, the higher the octane the less likely it is to ignite prematurely. The only benefit to a high octane fuel is that it allows an engine to run at a higher temperature and with a higher compression ratio without pinging. Higher octane fuel does not provide more energy, more power, better mileage, more torque, burn cleaner, clean your engine, and is not better for the environment. If the engine is pinging when using the correct octane fuel, then it may be necessary to move to the next higher octane to prevent pinging, and damage to your engine, unless there is another problem. If you are using higher octane fuel for any of these reasons, STOP, you are throwing your money away. Also, never use a lower octane fuel than is recommended by the manufacture. If the manufacture recommends 89 octane then use 89. If they recommend 87 then use 87. The key is what was the engine designed to run at to achieve optimum performance and mileage? One exception is when you are towing a heavy load with a vehicle designed to run on 87 and you experience pinging. In that case it may become necessary to switch to 89 while towing. In conclusion, race car engines are designed to run on high octane fuels due to their high compression engines. You cannot make your engine a race engine just by upping the octane. Save your hard earned money, and use exactly the octane you need.

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Spark knock


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What kind of gas does a maxima 2001


According to page 10-3 of the 2001 Nissan Maxima Owner's Manual:

FUEL RECOMMENDATION
Unleaded premium gasoline with an octane
rating of at least 91 AKI (Anti-Knock Index)
number (Research octane number 96)
If unleaded premium gasoline is not available,
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However, for maximum vehicle performance,
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Engine "knock" is not just an unusual sound - but over time can cause real damage to the engine. You *should* use fuels with the recommended octane levels, but if you choose to use fuel with a lower octane level due to reduce fuel costs - do not repeatedly use fuel that causes engine knock. Find the "sweet spot" between the cost of lower octane fuel and an octane level that does not cause knocking. Expect fuel economy and performance to drop with lower octane fuels, too.

Good luck!

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Since the code came up since adding the octane booster, I would say that is the problem. If you don't hear a knock coming from your engine, wait until you are at about a 1/4 of a tank and fill it up. This problem should go away on it's own.

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/jeremy_69f3cc28d95bf514

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