Question about 1987 GMC VanDura

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Engine will not fire at all. 1987 GMC S-15, 2.8L engine

Have replaced plugs, plug wires, coil, ignition module. With the ignition in the on position, measured 12VDC at the + terminal on the ignition module, but not at the C or B terminals. I believe that the B terminal should not have 12VDC, but the C terminal should have 12VDC. Can you help. Also, the book that we are using(Helms?) says that the pickup coil in the distributor should not read infinite resistance when measured between any of the two terminals on the coil to ground, however, I do get an infinite reading. The terminal to terminal resistance of the pickup coil is within the spec given by the book.

Hope you can help.

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Good Morning,

(1987, GMC, S-15, 2.8V6,Pickup truck) The problem still exists. I think I am to the point where I have to pull the distributor out of the engine. I have never done that before, so I will be very careful.
I also decribed the problem to your Premium Assistance Service and as of now, have had no response.

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

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Each ignition coil has an ignition 1 feed and a ground. The PCM supplies an ignition control (IC) circuit. Each ignition coil contains a solid state driver module as its primary element. The powertrain control module (PCM) signals the coil driver to initiate a firing event by applying a signal to the IC circuit at the appropriate time. When the signal is removed, the coil fires the spark plug. The spark plugs are tipped with platinum for long wear and higher efficiency.
During normal operation the powertrain control module (PCM) controls all ignition functions. If either the crankshaft position (CKP) or camshaft position (CMP) sensor signal is lost, the engine will continue to run because the PCM will default to a limp home mode using the remaining sensor input. As mentioned above, each coil is internally protected against damage from excessive voltage. If one or more coils were to fail in this manner, a misfiring condition would result. Diagnostic trouble codes are available to accurately diagnose the ignition system with a scan tool.
If a crank sensor is replaced a Crankshaft Position System Variation Learn must be done and a scan tool is need to do this.

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Hey there,i have a 1991 msuatng LX with the 2.3L ho engine running an 8 plug head. it sounds like i may have a misfire of some sort or my timing may be out but im not sure how to tell, could someone give...


Insert each wire on the proper terminal of the ignition coil. Ensure that the coil boots are fully seated and both locking tabs are engaged. The terminals are identified on the ignition coils. Install wires as shown in the illustration. The 2.3L firing order is 1-3-4-2 for both ignition coil assemblies.

Distributorless Ignition System In the distributorless ignition system (DIS), all engine timing and spark distribution is handled electronically with no moving parts. This system has fewer parts that require replacement and provides a more accurately timed spark. During basic operation, the EEC-IV determines the ignition timing required by the engine and a DIS module determines which ignition coil to fire.

Components
The distributorless ignition system (DIS) for the 2.3L twin spark plug engine consists of the following components:
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Crankshaft Timing Sensor
The crankshaft timing sensor is a dual hall effect magnetic switch, which is actuated by the dual vane cup on the crankshaft pulley hub assembly. This sensor generates two separate signals, PIP (profile ignition pick-up) and CID (cylinder identification). The PIP signal provides base timing and RPM information, while the CID signal is used to synchronize the ignition coils. Initial timing (base timing) is set at 10 degrees BTDC and is not adjustable. Ignition Coil Packs
Two ignition coil packs are used for the 2.3L dual plug engine. The two ignition coil packs are triggered by the DIS module and are timed by the EEC-IV. Each coil pack contains two separate ignition coils for a total of four ignition coils. Each ignition coil fires two spark plugs simultaneously, one spark plug on the compression stroke and one on the exhaust stroke. The spark plug fired on the exhaust stroke uses very little of the ignition coils, stored energy, and the majority of the ignition coils, energy is used by the spark plug on the compression stroke. Since these two spark plugs are connected in series, the firing voltage of one spark plug will be negative with respect to ground, while the other will be positive with respect to ground. Refer to thePowertrain Control/Emissions Diagnosis Manual for additional information on spark plug polarity. DIS Module
The main function of the DIS module is to switch between ignition coils and trigger the coils to spark. The DIS ignition module receives the PIP and CID signals from the crankshaft timing sensor, and the SPOUT (spark out) signal from the EEC-IV module. During normal operation, PIP is passed on to the EEC-IV module and provides base timing and RPM information. The CID signal provides the DIS ignition module with the information required to switch between the coils for cylinders 1 and 4 and the coils for cylinders 2 and 3. The SPOUT signal (from the EEC-IV) contains the optimum spark timing and dwell time information. The dwell time is controlled or varied by varying the duty cycle (duration) of the SPOUT signal. This feature is called CCD (computer controlled dwell). Therefore, with the proper inputs of PIP, CID and SPOUT the DIS ignition module turns the ignition coils on and off in the proper sequence for spark control. CID is also sent to the EEC-IV micro-processor to allow for Bank to Bank fuel control. Failure Mode Effects Management
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The CKP sensor is used to indicate crankshaft position and speed by sensing a missing tooth on a pulse wheel mounted to the crankshaft. The CMP sensor is used by the COP Integrated EI System to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The PCM uses the CKP signal to calculate a spark target and then fires the coil pack(s) to that target shown in Figure 51. The PCM uses the CMP sensor not shown in Figure 51 on COP Integrated EI Systems to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
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    The PCM acts as an electronic switch to ground in the coil primary circuit. When the switch is closed, battery positive voltage (B+) applied to the coil primary circuit builds a magnetic field around the primary coil. When the switch opens, the power is interrupted and the primary field collapses inducing the high voltage in the secondary coil windings and the spark plug is fired. A kickback voltage spike occurs when the primary field collapses. The PCM uses this voltage spike to generate an Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) signal. IDM communicates information by pulsewidth modulation in the PCM.
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2.5L V6

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by a pulse former within the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition timing is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions based on stored data tables or maps. Once ignition timing has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 5, cylinders 4 and 3 and cylinders 2 and 6) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This ensures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
---------------------------------------------------------------
2.0L 4 cynder

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition angle is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions. Once ignition angle has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 4 and cylinders 3 and 2) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This make sures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Integrated Electronic Ignition System The Integrated Electronic Ignition (EI) System consists of a crankshaft position (CKP) sensor, coil pack(s), connecting wiring, and PCM. The Coil On Plug (COP) Integrated EI System uses a separate coil for each spark plug and each coil is mounted directly onto the plug. The COP Integrated EI System eliminates the need for spark plug wires but does require input from the camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
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2 Answers

No spark to plugs or coil.


Do you have power to the coil with the key in the run position and when cranking? (ignition switch)

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2 Answers

1987 GMC S-15 2.8L engine will not fire on any cylinder.


Follow this link
It shows the step by step troubleshoting of non-starting engine
Good Luck
http://www.nls.net/mp/volks/htm/eng_strt.htm

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