Question about 1992 Honda Accord

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Puking oil I need to replace my cam shaft seal, crank shaft seal and timing chain myself are there any special tricks I need to know?

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If your car has a timing chain then you don't have a 92 Accord. That being said replacing your seals is pretty straight foreward. Get your self a waterpump while your at it. Its usually only 20 or 30 dollars, but if it fails the timing belt will break and it will kill your engine. Also make sure that the timing marks are lined up exactly right, one tooth off will cost you 20% or more on your gas mileage.

Posted on Jan 09, 2009

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To install a timing chain on a 1990 Buick Skylark


My Skylark used to make a diesel sounding noise while idling and it turned out to be a worn timing chain which I replaced myself. Some models have a timing gear instead of a timing chain and these can be very noisy as well (2.5 Iron Duke). By 80-90,000 miles you should replace the chain and or the gear set. Before you install your new chain make sure that tensioner is in the box and is compressed with a small metal clip. You will not be able to install the chain unless the tensioner is compressed. There simply won't be enough slack in the chain to reach the cam and crank shafts. While you are replacing the chain be sure to spend a couple of extra bucks and install a new timing cover seal. This seal keeps oil from leaking out of the oil pan behind the harmonic balancer. It is definitely worth the effort to put it in while it is apart.

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1 Answer

Is the front engine seal related to the time chain tensioner seal got a link behide the timeing belt


Don't quiet understand your question...but here's some insight.

The chain is under the valve cover/s ( 1.8t and some 2.8 V6.) and drives 2 or 4 cam shafts.

If it is the VR6 engine then the chain is in the front of the engine.

1.8t has seals on at cam sensor at rear of head and seals at front for crank and cam. To install it needs belt removed for front seals. 2.0 gas engine same except no rear cam seals.

All oil seals are now Teflon and a new instal procedure must be followed. Briefly : Installed dry...allowed to sit 4 hours before engine started.

Post again if this does not answer your question. We need year and model to give you a definitive answer.

Jan 12, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Passat

1 Answer

1988-1993 ford festiva leaking oil around the crank pulley... could the oil be coming out of timing chain seal... are could it be a the seal on the crank shaft.. if so would i need to removle the engine to...


This sounds like the crank seal, the engine doesnt have to be removed, in order to get to seal is like replacing the ttiming belt, and once in the timing belt i would replace the crank and cam seals, also do the timing belt, and maybe the waterpump, you will need to remove the crank pulley and then the timing covers then align timing marks for timing belt before ou remove it, with timing belt off the crank pulley then slides off the crankshaft and the seal is behind it, the cam shaft gear unbolts and the seal is behind the gear, once the gears are off then you will be able to remove the seals from the engine,heres a few diagrams to help. good luck and i hope this is helpful,60d826b.gifca916fa.gifcb2cb5a.gif

Oct 31, 2010 | 1993 Ford Festiva

1 Answer

Can i remove the timing chain tensioner from the top of the motor on a 2000 cavalier 2.2l or is that only with a dual cam?


Hi Friend:

Your Timing Chain Tensioner is located in the Lower Front of your engine.

#1) you'll have to disconnect your negative Battery cable.

#2) Remove the Top Engine cover to give you better access to the Front of Engine.

#3) Then you'll need to remove your alternator and with wiring attached put it off to the Side you might have to tie it with a wire to secure it.

#4) then you'll need to remove your Power Steering Leave the Lines on it and Put it to the sideas well , Tie off if necessary.

#5) then Jack up the front of your car,make sure you Put Good Stands under the car to keep it secure.while you work under it.

#6) then remove the TWO front Oil Pan Bolts Only the very 2-Front ones.

#7) Then directly above the Oil pan front of the Engine you'll see your Crank Shaft Pulley Remove it, You will need a Puller to Remove it.then the Timing Chain Cover, There are Several bolts Holding it on to the front of the Engine.

#8) Remove ALL the Bolts on Timing over, then Take cover Off,It could be a Little Stubborn ,if All bolts are out for sure, Take a Small plastic mallet and Tap the Cover Easily,until it comes off.

#9) Now before you remove anything else there is a Timing Mark on the Cam Shaft and one on the Crank Shaft,NOTE: BESURE you line them marks up,The Cam Shaft Mark should be pointing Straight Down--And the Crankshaft Mark needs to be Pointing Straight up.and Lined up with the Top Timing Mark.If the are Not

NOTE: Rotate the Engine by Hand Turning the Sprockets until they are LINED Up.

Then Take off the Top Cam Shaft Mounting Bolts,then Pull Sproket and timing Chain at the Same Time.

Then Loosen the Chain Tensioner Bolt with out taking it ALL the Way OUT. then remove your Chain Tensioner.

If your this far i Recommend that you Replace The Timing Chain,Cam Sproket and Crankshaft Sproket as well.

If not the Install your new Chain Tensioner,And Just Simply Reverse the Un-Install Directions.To Put All back Together.

Do Replace the Timing Cover Seal. Using Proper Seal Remover and Installer.

Also before you put your Timing cover back on CLEAN the Surfaces of the Engine and the Cover.And Use a Gasket Sealer and Mount to Block ==Lining Up ALL your Timing Cover Bolt Holes. Let it set a Short time a Few Minutes at Least. To prevent Slipping when installing your Timing Case Cover.

1- Last Thing Torque your Timing Chain Tensioner at 89 Inch Pounds.Which rewuires a Torque Wrench.

And Torque ALL your Timing Cover Bolts at 97 Inch Pounds.Do NOT Over Tighten You'll Strip them.

MAKE Sure the Timing Marks are Still lined up.

This will get your Timing Chain Tensioner Replaced. Thanks for using FixYa From: d_hubbs

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1 Answer

1999 cross country v70 awd crankshaft seal replacement


Your info is confusing. The rear cam seal is not inside the timing belt cover, and the crank seal is at the bottom of the engine, while the cam seal is at the top.

Is there oil at the top, around the cam seal? Or just at the bottom? It's common for the oil pump seal to leak. If you get the oil pump reseal kit, it contains the oil pump seal and gasket, as well as the crankshaft seal. Make sure you seal the oil pump bolts, Volvo has special copper washers for this purpose.

Just try to locate the oil leak before replacing any more parts. Sometimes it can be something simple like the oil cap seal or the oil trap housing.


Bret
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3 Answers

Need to replace timing chain on 2005 cavalier


I'm doing this myself, and there are some annoyances. Yes, a service manual is good, however, I consulted 2 manuals and got two different answers. Here is the real deal for the 1996 2.2 vin 4 cavalier.

Remove the right tire and platic sheilds. Remove the tensioner pully, (2 bolts).

Remove the harmonic balencer on the crank shaft, 3 bolts first then the center.

Use a pull hammer with correct thread to pull off the "crankshaft thing" on the end of the crank shaft. Be sure to pull it off evenly. I had to find a bolt with the same threads, cut that off, and tap a fitting for my **** hammer. It's on there good.

Remove 7 (8mm) bolts from around the chain cover. Remove the 2 (10mm) bolts from under the cover. Those two studs also have to come out with a small inner tourqe socket. These are very very easy to strip, be careful. The cover is now free.

It is sealed on tight. There are a couple good places to get a bite on the rear facing edge. You will also have to work from the top and bottom to get it free. It pulls strait out, it is positioned by pins. Be patient, that cover will break.

There is silicon that seals the bottom of the cover. Clean that all off with a scraper and wire brush. Pull off and clean where the gasket seats all around the cover. Clean the cover. Replace the gasket and the outer oil seal that goes around the crank shaft. The only way to get that seal out is to break it. Press the new one in with a vice, do it evenly and slowly.

I've found a good method to get the cam shaft sproket off.... There are 3 slots and a hole. Rotate the cam sproket clockwise till you get the hole to about 9o'clock. Put drill bit or short piece of hard metal (something that won't bend) in that hole and apply some pressure while you rotate another 10 degrees or so. The bit will drop into a hole. Now rotate counter-clockwise and the bit will bind the sproket so you can remove the bolt. Nice huh? I get it unbound by putting a screwdriver between teeth and prying against the crank shaft. Use your imagination.

The timing **** is retarded. And I still havn't found a deffinate answer for everything. The crank shaft makes two rotations for every one that the cam makes. The first crank shaft rotation is the compression stroke, the second is the power stroke. I don't know how to tell the difference.

To get the sprokets aligned, re-install the cam sproket, don't worry about getting it tight. Rotate it clockwise until the hole in the sproket lines up with the ear on the chain tensioner. Now, bind the gear right in that spot and remove it. Now, take that "crankshaft thingy" and push it on by hand as far as you can. Notice the key, and dot on one of teeth. Put the bolts partially in the thingy and rotate it by using a bar or screwdriver between the bolts. Move that sproket until the dot on the tooth lines up with the ear on the chain adjustor. The key will point directly up. Good job. Tap that thingy off the shaft now.

Compress the chain adjustor and put a pin through it. With the cam sproket removed, put the chain on it. Work the chain onto the crankshaft sproket. Slide the cam sproket onto the camshaft. Easier said than done, but it is possible. If you are having a hell of time, use a mirror and check that you are lining it up properly with the pin/key in the crankshaft. I found that leaving a little slack at the top, as opposed to the bottom helps. FYI, when i say little, i mean it. There is very very little slack, but the chain does buckle slightly.

Remember me saying that I have no idea how to tell between power and compression stroke. Now you will hate me. To get mine right, I had to tighten the cam sproket then replace my spark plugs and attempt to start to start the car. I guessed mine right the first time and it ran fine. However, if it ran rough or not at all. I would have had to remove the cam sproket again, remove the chain and rotate the crankshaft sproket one full turn.

When you put this all back together, use plenty of slicon on the bottom of the chain cover. Re-assembly is a snap, or at least is was for me.


Jul 28, 2008 | 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier

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