Question about 2008 Toyota Camry

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2007 4 cylinder camry se is using or leaking oil I went to a heavier weight 10w-40 it seems to have slowed the oil consumption I now use synthetic 10w-40. Help!!!

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Their  is a huge difference between leaking and using oil. place a large piece of carboard under the car one night and see if their is a lot of oil on the carboard the next moring. If so,  try to look under the car and see if you can tel where the oil is coming from. Have the leak fixed. It might be as simple as loose bolts.   If the engine is consuming oil because it has high mileage the use regular 10w40 or even  20w40 if you are in a warmer climate. If it is using oil you cannot afford to use the high priced synthetics. These are for relitively new cars .As it uses oil just replace it with the regular 20-w40 or 10w40. To slow down consumption use STP or MOTOR HONEY.or some other oil thickening agent on the market made for worn engines.  

Posted on Jan 07, 2009

Testimonial: "U r thinkin along the same lines as i am. Just was a little hesitant 2 use a much heavier oil than recommended. It iz ok, right????"

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Can i use Penrite 10w-40 semi synthetic oil in my 2002 Honda CRV for one oil change only plus filter change? car has done 248k's with no oil use


You could do that. It is a thicker oil and heavier weight, not usually recommended in the winter time cause it makes it harder to start the car. Your car has high miles thus more wear, I usually use 10w-40 in place of high-mileage oils (cause it has less detergents) unless the car has been using full synthetic oil from the start. I'd say ok, and if it runs sluggish then you can use something like Marvel Oil to thin it down and that will help clean and lubricate your engine too.

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Suitable engine oil for camry 96


  • Hi, Lijo.

  • The manufacturer recommends 5W30 conventional. I like Castrol myself. for a 1996 Camry. Newer Camry's require a 5W20 synthetic but not yours. Looks like 4 quarts is the amount.

  • If you have any comments please feel free to leave them here.
  • Hope this helps and thank you for using FixYa.

Regards,Tony

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1 Answer

2005 town and country 3.8 using oil. no leaks 2qts every 3000 miles. any ideas please?


For that type of oil consumption there must be traces of smoke at some time. If there is smoke at start-up and when you lift your foot off the pedal to slow down, the valve stem seals are leaking. If the smoke is predominantly seem under acceleration and normal driving, the oil seal rings are allowing oil into the cylinder/s. At present the oil consumption and cost (if there is no excessive smoke) will be a lit less than the repair of either of the factors I have mentioned above. Try changing to another brand of oil (synthetic oil seem to contribute to high oil consumption). Try a heavier brand of mineral oil, at least a 20W-50 or even a 60 for older engines. Go for an oil that is marketed and backed by a reputable company with a petroleum back round.

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What Kind Of Oil Do I Put In My 91 Toyota Pickup. 10W-30 or 10W-40?


Depends on the season and temperature that it will be driven in.
Generally 10w-40 is for the summer, and the thinner 10w-30 is for the winter, if you so desire.

According to the chart, 5w-30 is preferred but 10w-30 can be used in 0 deg. F up to 100 deg. F and beyond.

Fuel and Engine Oil Recommendations GENERAL INFORMATION Oils The SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) grade number indicates the viscosity of the engine oil; its resistance to flow at a given temperature. The lower the SAE grade number, the lighter the oil. For example, the mono-grade oils begin with SAE 5 weight, which is a thin, light oil, and continue in viscosity up to SAE 80 or 90 weight, which are heavy gear lubricants. These oils are also known as "straight weight'', meaning they are of a single viscosity, and do not vary with engine temperature. Fig. 1: Look for the API oil identification label when choosing your engine oil tccs1235.gif
Fig. 2: Before installing a new oil filter, coat the rubber gasket with clean oil tccs1901.jpg
Multi-viscosity oils offer the important advantage of being adaptable to temperature extremes. These oils have designations such as 10W-40, 20W-50, etc. The "10W-40'' means that in winter (the "W'' in the designation) the oil acts like a thin 10 weight oil, allowing the engine to spin easily when cold and offering rapid lubrication. Once the engine has warmed up, however, the oil acts like a straight 40 weight, maintaining good lubrication and protection for the engine's internal components. A 20W-50 oil would therefore be slightly heavier than and not as ideal in cold weather as the 10W-40, but would offer better protection at higher rpm and temperatures because when warm it acts like a 50 weight oil. Whichever oil viscosity you choose when changing the oil, make sure you are anticipating the temperatures your engine will be operating in until the oil is changed again. Refer to the oil viscosity chart for oil recommendations according to temperature. The API (American Petroleum Institute) designation indicates the classification of engine oil used under certain given operating conditions. Only oils designated for use "Service SG'' or greater should be used. Oils of the SG type perform a variety of functions inside the engine in addition to the basic function as a lubricant. Through a balanced system of metallic detergents and polymeric dispersants, the oil prevents the formation of high and low temperature deposits and also keeps sludge and particles of dirt in suspension. Acids, particularly sulfuric acid, as well as other by-products of combustion, are neutralized. Both the SAE grade number and the API designation bottle be found on the oil can. For recommended oil viscosities, refer to the chart. Fig. 3: Viscosity chart 86821236.gif
SYNTHETIC OIL There are many excellent synthetic oils currently available that can provide better gas mileage, longer service life, and in some cases better engine protection. These benefits do not come without a few hitches, however; the main one being the price of synthetic oils, which is three or four times the price per quart of conventional oil. Synthetic oil is not for every truck and every type of driving, so you should consider your engine's condition and your type of driving. Also, check your truck's warranty conditions regarding the use of synthetic oils. Both brand new engines and older, high mileage engines are often the wrong candidates for synthetic oil. A synthetic oil can be so slippery that they can prevent the proper break-in of new engines; most manufacturers recommend that you wait until the engine is properly broken in 3000 miles (4830 km) before using synthetic oil. Older engines with wear have a different problem with synthetics: they leak more oil as they age. Slippery synthetic oils get past worn parts easily. If your truck is leaking oil past old seals you'll most probably have a much greater leak problem with synthetics. Consider your type of driving. If most of your accumulated mileage is high speed, highway type driving, the more expensive synthetic oils may be a benefit. Extended highway driving gives the engine a chance to warm up, accumulating less acids in the oil and putting less stress on the engine over the long run. Trucks with synthetic oils may show increased fuel economy in highway driving, due to less internal friction. If synthetic oil is used, it should still be replaced at regular intervals as stated in the maintenance schedule. While the oil itself will last much longer than regular oil, pollutants such as soot, water and unburned fuel still accumulate within the oil. These are the damaging elements within a motor and must be drained regularly to prevent damage. Trucks used under harder circumstances, such as stop-and-go, city type driving, short trips, or extended idling, should be serviced more frequently. For the engines in these trucks, the much greater cost of synthetic or fuel-efficient oils may not be worth the investment. Internal wear increases much quicker on these trucks, causing greater oil consumption and leakage.

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What kind of motor oil does a 2003Dodge Caravan SE van use.


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1 Answer

What weight oil is used for a 1984 2wd toyota pickup


10w 40 - 20w 50 is good depeding on the mileage. If it is higher mileage, I would use the heavier oil(20w 50). If the engine has been rebuilt or is well maintained, low mileage, use the lower weight oil. Any quality brand will work. If you decide on synthetic, you will be stuck with synthetic! Royal Purple or Lubro Moly makes really great products to give longevity to your engine. It will come with a bigger price tag though.

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3 Answers

What motor oil weight should I be using on my 96 olds 88....we live where the winter temps can go as low as -10 F and as hot as 95F in the summer


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That being said. Changing from natural oil, to synthetic, back to naturual , or vice versa... swapping back and forth between these KINDS of oil has been known to cause damage. so whatever weight you decide on, stick with one "type", natural or synthetic.

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3 Answers

I don't know what weight of oil my car takes. i have been putting 10w-30 in my 1991 toyota celica st and i wanted to know if that is right because i want to switch my oil to synthetic.


As old as this is, you can certainly use 20W50 and might derive some benefit (slight fuel savings from a touch better compression, maybe you're burning a little even if it doesn't show in the exhaust- how often do you add?, etc.) Full synthetic can give you even wider viscosity range for easy cold starts without loss of high-temp performance- I think Mobil 1 has a 5W50 grade even, which my old Honda did great with.

Oct 23, 2009 | 1991 Toyota Celica

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