Question about 1990 Lexus LS 400

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Would someone give me a brief describtion of where to start on the motor to get the starter out.I have a starter repair man ready to rebuild it,but i need to know where on the motor i can gain access.Your help would be greatly appreciated.Thank you

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Under the engine and connected to the transmission with postivive and negative wirers running to it on the end of it. what kind of car???

Posted on Jan 05, 2009

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3 Answers

Stater spins but engine doesn' t turn over


Bummer. This is typically one of two things: starter drive, or teeth missing on the flywheel.
Of course, something can be cracked or loose, but surgery is the next step.

Feb 24, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Starter clicks will not turn over,1983 280z


If battery is good and strong, the starter is bad. If lights are weak battery is low. Then check charging system and battery integrity.
You can try tapping on starter motor with hammer if you can reach it. Be VERY careful not to hit wires. If its real tight, I've done this with a crowbar tip from on top on different car. Point is to wack it while key is in start position. Helper should be ready to release if starts.
Have someone hold key in start position then tap starter. Be ready it may crank right away. If this works the armature is bent and starter needs replacement.
Good luck

Sep 02, 2011 | 1983 Nissan 280ZX

2 Answers

After replacing starter on Mazda MPV,O/D light started flashing,Mech says it could be transmission problem,but the van was running fine before I took it in for repairs.Can you give me any suggestion


someone has broke or disconnected a wire somewhere under the car whilst changing the starter motor ,but what or where i couldnt tell you without having car on the ramp sorry

Nov 13, 2010 | 2001 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

I have a 95 monte z34. it is hard to start. the starter heats up and the coil pack sometimes smoke. but once it started it runs great but once you turn it off you cant start it back up for hours. someone...


hi, this sounds like INTERNAL SHORT IN THE STARTER MOTOR( the brushes wire contacting the comutator) meaning the BRUSHES are WORN. smell of burning from starter motor. (somtimes the starter motor stays engaged to the flywheel and the starter motor go's supersonic and distroyes itself). but get other advice first. in case i am wrong. DO NOT RELY ON MY ADVICE. gerry

Sep 11, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

2 Answers

Won't start makes click sound still have lights and power


The 'click' sound generally suggests a problem with the electrical side of things - my guess is your solenoid but it could also be low battery power, the starter cables or the starter motor itself.


Here's a quick diagnostic check I use to try and figure out my starting issues - hope it helps somewhat - this has been copied from a solution I provided a couple of days back - whilst you're on here this is a pretty common question so you should be able to find lots of answers already lying around the site. In your case, I'd probably start at 4 and work backwards as I suspect the last two are most likely to be your problem
1. Check your battery voltage with a multimeter - you should have 12.5V or so across the terminals - any less than about 11.8 and you should think about a new battery.

2. Check that you're getting power from the ignition switch to the solenoid. The light-dimming check should help you out on this one, however, we'll make doubly sure. Locate your starter motor and the solenoid (the solenoid will be wired to the starter motor - the circuit is basically battery, ignition key switch, solenoid and starter motor). Disconnect the ignition cable from the solenoid (this is the heavier cable) and put a multimeter from it to ground (somewhere metal on the chassis). Get someone to turn the key to ON and check for 12V at the ignition cable. (Always put the car in neutral and the parking brake on etc...). If you don't get 12V here you've got a connectivity problem and need to trace your wiring back to your ignition switch and from there to the battery and try to find a poor connection or potential short - from the clicking sound this problem seems unlikely.

3. Now we want to test the starter motor to ensure it's OK. To do this, we need a large screwdriver with an nicely insulated handle. On the SOLENOID, you'll find to large electrical post connectors. Short across these with the screwdriver - be careful to only touch the handle or you're going to think someone has just kicked you in the groin...You should get some serious sparks and hear your starter motor whirring (don't let it run too long or you'll flatten your battery and possibly damage the starter motor). If your starter motor makes any nasty grinding kinds of noises, you need to replace or rebuild it. If it doesn't move, you need to replace it (or get it rebuilt). Sometimes you can 'rock' the car in gear to persuade the starter motor to move slightly and it will then turn for you.

4. If none of the other problem have suggested a component at fault, you probably have a faulty or 'sticky' solenoid. To check this, find which of the two heavy post connectors is connected to the starter motor. Place one probe of the multimeter in this wire and ground the other (metal on the chassis). Have someone turn the key (neutral and parking brake) and check the voltage. You should read 12V and hear a 'clunk' from the solenoid (this is the solenoid activating and sending power to the starter motor). If you're getting a low voltage and not hearing a clunk your solenoid is probably on it's way out and needs to be replaced. A quick fix that often works is to have your helper try to start the car and give the solenoid a bit of a tap with a rubber mallet. This might jar the mechanism loose and give the electromagnet a chance to pull it into the connecting position and power your starter motor.

Dec 29, 2009 | 2006 Nissan Pathfinder

1 Answer

My vehicle dont start .. i put key in n i turn to start it n it dont start


Here's a quick diagnostic check I use to try and figure out my starting issues - hope it helps somewhat - this has been copied from a solution I provided a couple of days back - whilst you're on here this is a pretty common question so you should be able to find lots of answers already lying around the site.
1. Check your battery voltage with a multimeter - you should have 12.5V or so across the terminals - any less than about 11.8 and you should think about a new battery whilst you're at it. However, as it seems to start fine sometimes, I'm going to assume this is not the problem
2. Check that you're getting power from the ignition switch to the solenoid. The light-dimming check should help you out on this one, however, we'll make doubly sure. Locate your starter motor and the solenoid (the solenoid will be wired to the starter motor - the circuit is basically battery, ignition key switch, solenoid and starter motor). Disconnect the ignition cable from the solenoid (this is the heavier cable) and put a multimeter from it to ground (somewhere metal on the chassis). Get someone to turn the key to ON and check for 12V at the ignition cable. (Always put the car in neutral and the parking brake on etc...). If you don't get 12V here you've got an intermittent connectivity problem and need to trace your wiring back to your ignition switch and from there to the battery and try to find a poor connection or potential short.
3. Now we want to test the starter motor to ensure it's OK. To do this, we need a large screwdriver with an nicely insulated handle. On the SOLENOID, you'll find to large electrical post connectors. Short across these with the screwdriver - be careful to only touch the handle or you're going to think someone has just kicked you in the groin...You should get some serious sparks and hear your starter motor whirring (don't let it run too long or you'll flatten your battery and possibly damage the starter motor). If your starter motor makes any nasty grinding kinds of noises, you need to replace or rebuild it. If it doesn't move, you need to replace it (or get it rebuilt). Sometimes you can 'rock' the car in gear to persuade the starter motor to move slightly and it will then turn for you.
4. If none of the other problem have suggested a component at fault, you probably have a faulty or 'sticky' solenoid. To check this, find which of the two heavy post connectors is connected to the starter motor. Place one probe of the multimeter in this wire and ground the other (metal on the chassis). Have someone turn the key (neutral and parking brake) and check the voltage. You should read 12V and hear a 'clunk' from the solenoid (this is the solenoid activating and sending power to the starter motor). If you're getting a low voltage and not hearing a clunk your solenoid is probably on it's way out and needs to be replaced. A quick fix that often works is to have your helper try to start the car and give the solenoid a bit of a tap with a rubber mallet. This might jar the mechanism loose and give the electromagnet a chance to pull it into the connecting position and power your starter motor.

Hope this helps, Sherwin

Dec 27, 2009 | 2004 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

Bummer starter prob.....


well the hammer is a good idea... but not to trash it. have someone attempt to start it while someone else uses the hammer to tap the starter... if it starts... replace the starter... i presume the battery light isn't on ?

Robert

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Feb 28, 2009 | 1995 Ford F150 Styleside Regular Cab

1 Answer

Car won't start


Try Replacing the started. its right on the back of the motor it attachs to the transmission. its not that hard getting it out. the hard part is getting it back in. my friend had the same problem. and it was the starter the silinode had just enough power to crank the motor, But wounldnt start it. so its the starter for sure. You can get a core charge at your Local Autozone. The Part About $132.00 its better than not having a car at all. Right? Well Hope All works out for you and good luck to you.

Aug 03, 2008 | 1999 Nissan Sentra

1 Answer

Problems when going to start again


Have you had your solenoid and starter motor checked and possibly refurbished at the same time as the alternator? If everything else is operating as expected I would point my finger at this...
Here's a quick diagnostic check I use to try and figure out my starting issues - hope it helps somewhat - this has been copied from a solution I provided a couple of days back - whilst you're on here this is a pretty common question so you should be able to find lots of answers already lying around the site.
1. Check your battery voltage with a multimeter - you should have 12.5V or so across the terminals - any less than about 11.8 and you should think about a new battery whilst you're at it. However, as it seems to start fine sometimes, I'm going to assume this is not the problem
2. Check that you're getting power from the ignition switch to the solenoid. The light-dimming check should help you out on this one, however, we'll make doubly sure. Locate your starter motor and the solenoid (the solenoid will be wired to the starter motor - the circuit is basically battery, ignition key switch, solenoid and starter motor). Disconnect the ignition cable from the solenoid (this is the heavier cable) and put a multimeter from it to ground (somewhere metal on the chassis). Get someone to turn the key to ON and check for 12V at the ignition cable. (Always put the car in neutral and the parking brake on etc...). If you don't get 12V here you've got an intermittent connectivity problem and need to trace your wiring back to your ignition switch and from there to the battery and try to find a poor connection or potential short.
3. Now we want to test the starter motor to ensure it's OK. To do this, we need a large screwdriver with an nicely insulated handle. On the SOLENOID, you'll find to large electrical post connectors. Short across these with the screwdriver - be careful to only touch the handle or you're going to think someone has just kicked you in the groin...You should get some serious sparks and hear your starter motor whirring (don't let it run too long or you'll flatten your battery and possibly damage the starter motor). If your starter motor makes any nasty grinding kinds of noises, you need to replace or rebuild it. If it doesn't move, you need to replace it (or get it rebuilt). Sometimes you can 'rock' the car in gear to persuade the starter motor to move slightly and it will then turn for you.
4. If none of the other problem have suggested a component at fault, you probably have a faulty or 'sticky' solenoid. To check this, find which of the two heavy post connectors is connected to the starter motor. Place one probe of the multimeter in this wire and ground the other (metal on the chassis). Have someone turn the key (neutral and parking brake) and check the voltage. You should read 12V and hear a 'clunk' from the solenoid (this is the solenoid activating and sending power to the starter motor). If you're getting a low voltage and not hearing a clunk your solenoid is probably on it's way out and needs to be replaced. A quick fix that often works is to have your helper try to start the car and give the solenoid a bit of a tap with a rubber mallet. This might jar the mechanism loose and give the electromagnet a chance to pull it into the connecting position and power your starter motor.

May 29, 2008 | 1992 Mazda MX-5

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