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I have a John Deere 100 heater it worked ,I had a fuel leak. fixed that the all of a sudden it blows unburned fuel out of the exhaust end. does the photo sensor have anything to do with it.? or the fuel pump is bad? Cannot figure it out.

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Wherre was this fuel leak? Did you bled the air out of the system after the repair to for the fuel leak? If not do that.

Posted on Nov 05, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Unburned fuel blowing out the exhaust

Yes, that can be caused by an O2 sensor.

Valves, fouled plugs, etc., would usually cause "missing", not necessarily rich mixture.

Posted on May 27, 2009

bunnydawg
  • 5158 Answers

SOURCE: 2000 Xterra intermentantly overheats

sounds more like the thermostat may be failing. generally a water pump starts leaking out of the "weep" hole in the casting before it quits. just look at the front of the water pump for a greenish streak or an obvious leak.
if you also suspect you heater core may be getting plugged now would be a good time to back flush it to get rid of some of the gunk.

Posted on Oct 22, 2009

SOURCE: my car suddenly started blowing white smoke

CHECK THE ENGINE MAY BE BURNING OIL.PISTON RINGS AND LINERS WORN.

Posted on Mar 12, 2010

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Megan 2005 knocking from underside of car when i take my foot off the accelerator pedal and let the car run free, i have fitted a new exhaust back end braket and the knocking is still there


A knock in the motor is caused by excess fuel vapor traped in the cylinder(s).
EX: The piston moves up, spark ignites compressed air/fuel mixter, ignition forces piston back down, some fuel vavor is left unburned. Piston return trip up, unburned vapor is egnited untimely, and immediatly after new air/fuel mixter is ignited.
the second explosion rocks the upper of the cylinder beating on the valve cover, if in more than one cylinder the sound is louder.
this is caused by a weak spark and/or unballance in air/fuel ratio.

If check engine light is on, scan for codes, if this is fixex right away it cause further damage.
flooding the motor, cause No Start
blowing through valve cover gasket
piston ring will be affected

when you hear the knock louder in lower of the motor, that is an indication that the rod bearing(s) are going to go out soon, and your car is going to leave you stranded.

Best thing to do,

Stop Driving Car Until You can have your mechanic properly diagnose the problem, and be fixed.

Mar 07, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How do i fix engine giving out so much black smoke and not even powering?


Black smoke is unburned fuel and a lot of it, so maybe you have a fuel problem. I would first check fuel pressure to see if you have a fuel pump or fuel pressure regulator problem. If the pressure is correct, next you could check for clogged or leaking fuel injectors.

If any cylinders are misfiring, that could be pushing a lot of unburned gas out the exhaust. Pull the spark plugs and see how they have been firing. That may indicate any problem cylinders. If all plugs are uniformly coated with a black soot, that means the fuel/air ratio is very rich. Check for air obstructions like a dirty air filter or check the fuel pressure regulator.

Oct 20, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Idles rough and low intermittently. Stalls occaisionally. Error code P1137 pulled off of the computer. 2001 Alero, 2.4L Automatic trans


P1137 is HO2S Bank 1 Sensor 2 Lean Or Low Voltage. Oxygen sensor is reading a "lean condition". This code probably is stored from the rough and low idling. So it sounds like you maybe having other issues causing this P1137 code to come up. For lean conditions read this:
1. Vacuum leaks - check for failed or loose vacuum lines, leaking intake gaskets, intake air tubes loose or any other source of un-metered air leaks (leaks after the Mass Air Flow Sensor)
2. Restricted fuel filter or bent/pinched fuel system lines
3. Incorrect input from other sensors, such as the Mass Air Flow Sensor/cam or crank sensors, which may not always drop a separate code
4. Engine misfire ? Yes I know this one may seem weird. You might think that if there is a misfire then you will have all that unburned fuel and it should read rich; right? Well the O2 sensors read only oxygen content in the exhaust, so if you have all that unburned fuel from incomplete combustion then, you guessed it, you also have all that unburned oxygen. High O2 content in exhaust equals a lean reading!

Sep 07, 2011 | Oldsmobile Alero Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Fuel mixing in with oil


This could be many different things. The most common is a bad fuel pressure regulator or an injector sticking open.You dont say if it is missing or blowing black smoke out of the exhaust? If it is missing on one or more cylinders start bypulling the plugs and checking compression on those cylinders. unburned fuel accumulating in a cylinder with low compression can leak past the rings and dilute the oil with gasoline.

Jan 30, 2011 | 1991 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

Gas order inside vehicle - could this be caused from the fuel pressure regulator?


If it is a gasoline ( raw fuel, unburned) smell, it could be caused by a number of fuel line related problems and leaks including the fuel pressure regulator. If it is an exhaust smell, check for an exhaust leak in or near the engine compartment.
There should be a cowling hood seal at the rear of the hood that is supposed to keep those fumes out of the passanger compartment.
Good luck.

Jan 30, 2011 | 2000 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

I have a jaguar s type , year 2000 , the heater is only blowing cold air


Sounds like your heater core could be blocked up or a blockage in the pipes. Most car heaters run off a heater core that cycles hot water from the engine's water jacket, or a heat exchanger around the exhaust manifold, through the core, with a fan then blowing this hot air through the vents to you. If the pipes from the water jacket to the heater core are blocked then no hot water will get through. Alternatively, the heater core or pipes may be damaged and leaking. Check to ensure you're not losing any coolant. If it's the heater core, there's really nothing for it but to replace it. I'm not 100% sure where it would be on your car, on my old car it was up behind the centre console, under the dash. Hope that helps. Cheers, John

Nov 23, 2010 | 2000 Jaguar S-Type

1 Answer

I have a 2003 Mercury Sable with engine code 1031 what is the problem,I need to get this corrected to have the car inspected.Thank you.


DTC P1031 - HO2S Heater Current Monitor Control Circuit Sensors 1

Its refer to the Oxigen Sensor; the most common issues for lean codes are:
1. Vacuum leaks - check for failed or loose vacuum lines, leaking intake gaskets, intake air tubes loose or any other source of un-metered air leaks (leaks after the Mass Air Flow Sensor)
2. Restricted fuel filter or bent/pinched fuel system lines
3. Incorrect input from other sensors, such as the Mass Air Flow Sensor, which may not always drop a separate code
4. Engine misfire – Yes I know this one may seem weird. You might think that if there is a misfire then you will have all that unburned fuel and it should read rich; right? Well the O2 sensors read only oxygen content in the exhaust, so if you have all that unburned fuel from incomplete combustion then, you guessed it, you also have all that unburned oxygen. High O2 content in exhaust equals a lean reading! There are also some other possibilities such as an internally leaking EGR system, (but this will typically set a separate code). A leak in the exhaust system before the O2 sensor will also cause incorrect readings. And always check for after- market modifications. These can throw a wrench into the works! The only other possibilities (however unlikely), are wiring issues, computer concerns or a bad O2 sensor! There now that I’ve said it, on to rich codes.

The possible causes of rich codes are:
1. A leaking or faulty fuel injector
2. Fuel injector driver in computer shorted, or wiring short for injectors (likely a ground short)
3. Leaking or faulty fuel pressure regulator or restricted return line
4. Faulty evaporative emissions system - bleeding fuel vapors into engine (not commanded by computer)
5. On newer models a faulty fuel pump or fuel pump driver module
6. Faulty readings from other sensors such as a Mass Air Flow Sensor. You may actually be getting more air than the MAF tells the computer
7. Exhaust leaks before the sensor will cause erratic readings
8. After market components or performance chips
9. And yes, if I dare say it, possibly a computer, wiring issue or even a faulty O2 sensor!

The other codes we should address are those related to the sensors located after the catalytic converter. Though these may appear identical to the oxygen sensors pre-converter, they perform an entirely different task and are known as Monitors. The only job of these sensors is to “monitor” the efficiency of the catalytic converters. The readings from these sensors should be much more stable and not fluctuating like the front O2 sensors. The computer compares the readings from the oxygen sensors (pre cats) and the monitors (post cat) to determine if the catalytic converters are doing their job and “cleaning” the exhaust. You never want to replace a monitor for a rich/lean concern as they have no bearing on these codes. As the converters begin to fail, you will see the monitors voltage readings follow the oxygen sensor readings. Technically these are all “oxygen sensors” but it is important to distinguish the difference between pre-converter & post converter sensors, so I find it easiest to stick to calling the back ones monitors.

Hope helps (remember rated this).


Jul 14, 2010 | 2003 Mercury Sable

2 Answers

Code 171 engine runs lean ,engine sparks knocks


what should we check when we have those pesky rich or lean codes? The most common issues for lean codes are:

1. Vacuum leaks - check for failed or loose vacuum lines, leaking intake gaskets, intake air tubes loose or any other source of un-metered air leaks (leaks after the Mass Air Flow Sensor)
2. Restricted fuel2_bing.gif filter or bent/pinched fuel system lines
3. Incorrect input from other sensors, such as the Mass Air Flow Sensor, which may not always drop a separate code
4. Engine misfire – Yes I know this one may seem weird. You might think that if there is a misfire then you will have all that unburned fuel and it should read rich; right? Well the O2 sensors read only oxygen content in the exhaust, so if you have all that unburned fuel from incomplete combustion then, you guessed it, you also have all that unburned oxygen. High O2 content in exhaust equals a lean reading! There are also some other possibilities such as an internally leaking EGR system, (but this will typically set a separate code). A leak in the exhaust system before the O2 sensor will also cause incorrect readings. And always check for after- market modifications. These can throw a wrench into the works! The only other possibilities (however unlikely), are wiring issues, computer concerns or a bad O2 sensor! .

May 30, 2010 | 2000 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

Unburned fuel blowing out the exhaust


Yes, that can be caused by an O2 sensor.

Valves, fouled plugs, etc., would usually cause "missing", not necessarily rich mixture.

May 27, 2009 | 1999 Isuzu Rodeo

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