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Ignition module changed scan reads high voltage

Had ignition control module changed.After sitting overnight initial start is very hard . ses light comes on. had it scanned and it read high voltage

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 116 Answers

SOURCE: po605 and po700

p0700 is a generic trans. code, so the problem if it is in the trans. would require further trans diag. so i would scan trans specific codes first. but in most cases when a chrysler tells you it is an internal controller fault you can believe it. just make sure which controller it is telling you has a fault!

Posted on May 19, 2009

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csmock132
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SOURCE: Mustang, 1992 2.3L dual point OBD 1 error codes problem

Have you checked for spark on all 8 plugs? Unplug the exhaust side coil pack and run the engine. Does it run on all 4 cylinders?

Posted on May 27, 2009

motor1258
  • 6674 Answers

SOURCE: 95 Blazer code P0401

Have a little read of this link, it may help you.

http://www.obd-codes.com/p0401

Posted on Jun 19, 2009

  • 593 Answers

SOURCE: 1996 chevy silverado has hard time starting. Put

Check the connections at the vehicle control module
(vcm) located on the left fender. Check for bent-broken pins or pins that have pushed through the plug
Make sure the connections are tight and dry.
Do the same at the coil. Also check for any exposed
or shorted wires between the two. Hope this helps

Posted on Mar 03, 2010

  • 340 Answers

SOURCE: 1997 gmc sierra 350 vortec 3/4 ton - engine turns over

this is a ignition switch problem (key) probably ok change the switch part ( they have your part at autozone

Posted on Mar 04, 2010

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O5 Colorado got the ecm code when I shut off the truck and now it won't turn over


What ECM code ? What is everything else that is working ? Headlamps , inside lighting , radio etc... When you turn the key on do the instrument cluster warning lights come on then off a few seconds later ? Anti-theft (security light ) On ? Flashing ? Do you know what all is involved ,or happens when you turn the key to start ?
Circuit Description (ECM/PCM Controlled)
Moving the ignition switch to the START position sends a 12-volt signal to the engine control module (ECM)/powertrain control module (PCM) Crank Request circuit. The ECM/PCM verifies that the transmission is in the PARK or NEUTRAL position. With the transmission in Park, voltage flows through the Park/Neutral position switch and feeds the starter relay coil. The PCM then grounds the control circuit of the starter relay. When the starter relay is energized it allows battery positive voltage to the starter solenoid S terminal. On some vehicles the starter will continue to crank the engine with the key released until it starts or the crank command has timed out to prevent excessive heat build up in the starter circuitry or the ECM/PCM receives an engine run flag.
Circuit Description (BCM Controlled)
Moving the ignition to the START position signals the body control module (BCM) that engine crank has been requested. The BCM verifies that theft is not active and sends a serial data message to the powertrain control module (PCM) requesting engine start. The BCM also energizes the RUN/CRANK RELAY. When the RUN/CRANK RELAY switch side closes, and the vehicle is in Park or Neutral or with the clutch is fully depressed, if equipped, supplies voltage to the starter relay coil. The PCM verifies the transmission is in Park or Neutral and the clutch is fully depressed, if equipped. The PCM will then ground the control circuit of the starter relay, closing the switch supplying voltage to the starter solenoid. On some vehicles the starter will continue to crank the engine with the key released until it starts of the crank command has timed out to prevent excessive heat build up in the starter circuitry or the PCM receives an engine run flag.


Verify that no starter relay, immobilizer, or automatic transmission DTCs are set that would cause the PCM to disable starting.
? If the specified DTCs are set, refer to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List - Vehicle .
Ignition ON, observe the scan tool PCM Ignition 1 Signal parameter with a scan tool. The reading should be greater than 10.0 Volts.
? If less than the specified value, test the ETC, PCM 1, and PCM B fuses, the RUN/CRNK relay, and the PCM ignition voltage circuits for an open/high resistance. If the circuits test normal, replace the PCM.
Ignition OFF, remove the START relay.
Verify that a test lamp illuminates between the B+ circuit terminal 30 and ground.
? If the test lamp does not illuminate, test the START fuse and the B+ circuit for an open/high resistance.
Ignition ON, transmission in Park or clutch pedal pressed, verify that a test lamp illuminates between the PNP/clutch start switch signal circuit terminal 86 and ground.
? If the test lamp does not illuminate, test the IGN fuse, RUN/CRANK relay, PNP/clutch switch ignition voltage circuit, and the signal circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuits test normal, test or replace the PNP switch or the clutch start switch.
Connect a test lamp between the park/neutral signal circuit terminal 86 and the relay coil control circuit terminal 85.
Ignition ON, transmission in Park, or clutch pedal pressed, turn the ignition switch between the START and RUN positions. The test lamp should turn ON and OFF when changing between the commanded states.
? If the test lamp is always ON, test the relay control circuit for a short to ground. If the circuit tests normal, replace the PCM.
? If the test lamp is always OFF, test the relay control circuit for a short to voltage or an open/high resistance. Test the PNP/clutch start switch signal circuit for an open/high resistance. If the circuits test normal, replace the PCM.
Install the START relay.
Connect a test lamp between the starter solenoid terminal and ground.

Mar 12, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Is there more than one modular on a 96 Blazer is one in the distributor


More then one modular ? Module ! Ignition module ? Which engine ? 2.2 L or 4.3 L

2.2 L has no dist.The electronic ignition (EI) system does not use the conventional distributor and coil.

4.3 L Enhanced Ignition System (Overview)
The ignition system initiates combustion by providing a spark to ignite the compressed air and fuel mixture at the correct time. In order to provide an improved engine performance, fuel economy, and control of exhaust emissions, the control module controls the distributor spark advance, or timing, with the ignition control (IC) system.
The ignition system uses a primary and secondary sub system in order to accomplish the timed spark distribution. The primary system consists of a low voltage trigger device which determines the base timing. This signal is modified by the ignition control driver (ICD) module. The signal travels to either or both the engine and transmission processor (control module) for base timing reference. Another signal is sent back to the ignition control driver (ICD) module, which has been adjusted by the control module (advanced or retarded) in order to trigger the coil, according to the requirements of the engine.
The secondary system consists of the ignition coil which has primary, or low voltage, windings and secondary, or high voltage, windings. The secondary side of the ignition coil generates a high voltage which high tension spark plug wires deliver to the spark plugs.
The control module controller now controls the ignition control (IC) and bypass functions.
In order to properly control the ignition and combustion timing, the control module needs to know the following things:
• The crankshaft position
• The engine speed or RPM
• The engine load -- manifold pressure or vacuum
• The atmospheric or barometric pressure
• The engine coolant temperature
• The camshaft position sensor

No module in the distributor

Dec 23, 2016 | 1996 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

08 avalanche power steps have no power fuse good


Do you know there is a electronic control module for the power steps ? assist step control module !

Circuit/System Description
The assist step control module (ASC) controls the assist step actuators to extend or retract the assist steps. Each actuator consists of an electric motor and a potentiometer. The module supplies a low reference and 10-volt reference source voltage to the potentiometer. The ASC module monitors the voltage drop across the potentiometer on the position signal circuit. When the actuator shaft rotates, the voltage on the position signal circuit changes. The ASC module supplies the actuator motor with a 12-volt control circuit and a ground control circuit. The ASC module controls the direction of the actuator by changing the polarity of the control circuits.

Do you know how to test electric circuits with a DVOM ?
Circuit/System Testing
ASC Disable Switch Circuit Test
Ignition OFF, disconnect the harness connector at the IP multifunction switch.
Test for less than 10 ohms between the listed ground circuit terminal and ground.
• X88/Z88 Terminal 3
• Z75 terminal 1
? If greater than the specified range, test the ground circuit for an open/high resistance.
Ignition ON, verify the scan tool ASC Disable Switch parameter is Inactive.
? If not the specified value, test the signal circuit terminal 9 for a short to ground. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Install a 3A fused jumper wire between the signal circuit terminal 9 and ground. Verify the scan tool ASC Disable Switch parameter is Active.
? If not the specified value, test the signal circuit for a short to voltage or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
If all circuits test normal, test or replace the IP multifunction switch.
ASC Actuator Circuit Test
Ignition OFF, disconnect the harness connector at the appropriate actuator.
Scan tool disconnected, test for less than 20 ohms between the low reference circuit terminal C and ground.
? If greater than the specified range, test the low reference circuit for an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Ignition ON, command the appropriate actuator with a scan tool while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 9 volts between the 10-volt reference circuit terminal D and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the 10-volt reference circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Command the appropriate actuator with a scan tool while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 9 volts between the signal circuit terminal E and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the signal circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Using a scan tool, command the appropriate actuator both directions while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 2 volts between the control circuit terminal A and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the control circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
Using a scan tool, command the appropriate actuator both directions while using the DMM Min/Max function to capture voltage. Test for greater than 2 volts between the control circuit terminal B and ground.
? If less than the specified range, test the control circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the ASC module.
If all circuits test normal, replace the ASC actuator.

Nov 24, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is fuel pump harness on a 2000 escalade


DTC P1351 Ignition Coil Control Circuit High Voltage
The enhanced ignition system uses the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor in order to provide a timing input to the control module. Ignition control (IC) spark timing for each cylinder is based on this input. The control module provides the ignition timing signal to the ignition control module (ICM) to control the ignition coil. Each timing pulse detected by the ICM allows it to energize the ignition coil. A large secondary ignition voltage is induced in the secondary coil by the primary coil. This high voltage is switched to the correct spark plug by the distributor.
This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) will set if the VCM- (vehicle control module ) detects an unusually high voltage on the ignition timing signal circuit.
Diagnostic Aids
Intermittent test -- If the connections and the harness check OK, monitor a digital voltmeter connected between VCM terminal C3 pin 9 and C4 pin 18 while moving related connectors and wiring harness. If the failure is induced, the voltage reading will change. This may help to isolate the location of the malfunction.
An intermittent may be caused by any of the following conditions:
?€¢
A poor connection

?€¢
Rubbed through wire insulation

?€¢
A broken wire inside the insulation
Thoroughly check any circuitry that is suspected of causing the intermittent complaint. Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections in Wiring Systems.
If a repair is necessary, refer to Wiring Repairs or Connector Repairs in Wiring Systems.
Check out this guy's video on GM fuel pump electrical circuit diagnosis !

GM Fuel Pump Relay Testing

Apr 21, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine cold. Start engine reading says engine hot ac off. Fans run all time.


Are the fans running on low or high ?
Circuit/System Description
The engine control module (ECM) commands the fans ON in either high speed or low speed, depending on cooling requirements. In low speed, both fans are turned ON at a reduced speed. High speed has both fans turned ON at full speed.
In low speed operation, the ECM applies ground to the coil side of the fan low relay. This energizes the coil and applies voltage directly to the left cooling fan through the switch side of the fan low relay, which is fed by the fan 1 fuse. The right fan is connected in series to the left fan through the de-energized fan control relay so that both operate at low speed.
In high speed operation, the ECM applies a ground to the coil side of the fan low relay, the fan control relay , and the fan high relay. On the fan high relay, the energized coil closes the switch side of the relay and applies voltage directly to the right cooling fan through the switch side of the relay, which is fed by the fan 2 fuse. At the same time, the ECM energizes fan control relay pulling the switch side over, providing a direct path to ground for the left cooling fan, which has voltage applied through the energized fan low relay. In high speed mode, the fans are operated as a parallel circuit with full voltage applied to each.
You should have it hooked up to a scan tool that can read engine sensor data parameters . Check for DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes etc...
Circuit/System Verification
  1. If DTCs P0480 or P0481 are set, perform those diagnostics first.
  2. Ignition ON, verify with a scan tool that the control module is not commanding fan activation.
  3. Ignition ON, observe that the fans are not activated.
Your best bet is to take it to a ASE certified repair shop !

Jan 10, 2016 | 2009 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

Where's is the fuse located for my brake lights on my 2007 Pontiac g6 and rear defrost fuse


Stop Lamps
your br
The brake pedal position sensor is used to sense the action of the driver application of the brake pedal. The brake pedal position sensor provides an analog voltage signal that will increase as the brake pedal is applied. The body control module (BCM) provides a low reference signal and a 5-volt reference voltage to the brake pedal position sensor. When the variable signal reaches a voltage threshold indicating the brakes have been applied, the BCM will apply battery positive voltage to the stop lamps, transmission control module (TCM), engine control module (ECM), and stop lamp relay coil side. When the stop lamp relay receives battery voltage from the BCM, the relay coil is energized and the stop lamp relay switch contacts close applying battery voltage through the STOP LP fuse to illuminate the center high mounted stop lamp (CHMSL).
I'd say you have more then a bad fuse ,just reading how the brake lights function .You should have it hooked up to a professional grade scan tool ,one that can check for DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes in the BCM - body control module !
  1. Install a scan tool.
  2. Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
  3. With a scan tool, observe the Brake Pedal Position Sensor parameter in the data list for the body control module (BCM).
  4. Apply and release the brake pedal.
Does the scan tool display a change in the voltage?

DTC B3903 Stop Lamp Relay Circuit DTC C0277 Brake Pedal Position Sensor Circuit
DTC C0278
Did you perform the Diagnostic System Check - Vehicle?
Go to Step 2
Go to Diagnostic System Check - Vehicle

2

  1. Install a scan tool.
  2. Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
Does the scan tool display DTC C0278 00?
Go to Step 3
Go to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections

3

Recalibrate the brake position sensor.

Circuit Description
DTC C0870
The body control module (BCM) applies a ground through the brake sensor reference low circuit to the brake pedal position (BPP) sensor. The BCM supplies a 5-volt reference through the brake sensor reference voltage circuit to the brake position sensor. When the brake pedal is being applied, the BPP sensor then sends a variable voltage signal through the brake sensor signal circuit to the BCM.
Circuit/System Verification
  1. Ignition ON, observe the scan tool Brake Lamp Cmd. parameter as you apply and unapply the brake pedal. The parameter should change between OFF and ON as the brake pedal is applied and released.
  2. ?‡'
    If the parameter does not change as the brake pedal is applied and released, refer to Brake Pedal Position Sensor (BPPS) Malfunction.

  3. With a scan tool, command the LR Stop/Turn Signal Lamp ON and OFF. The LR turn signal should turn ON and OFF when changing between the commanded states.
  4. ?‡'
    If the LR stop lamp does not illuminate when commanded, refer to Stop Lamps Malfunction.

  5. With a scan tool, command the RR Stop/Turn Signal Lamp ON and OFF. The RR turn signal should turn ON and OFF when changing between the commanded states.
?‡'
If the RR stop lamp does not illuminate when commanded, refer to Stop Lamps Malfunction.






I
I'd

Sep 26, 2015 | Pontiac Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Am having trouble with my chevolet colorado 3.7 lt


Possible causes
- Faulty ignition switch
- Ignition Switch harness is open or shorted
- Ignition Switch circuit poor electrical connection
- Faulty Engine Control Module (ECM)
help.jpg What does this mean?
When is the code detected?
The ECM has detected a voltage deifference between two circuits
Possible symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Possible no crank or start
P1682 Chevrolet Description
There are 2 ignition 1 voltage circuits supplied to the Engine Control Module (ECM). The first ignition circuit is provided by the powertrain relay, through a fuse. This ignition 1 voltage circuit supplies power to all the internal ECM circuits associated with the throttle actuator control (TAC) operation. The second ignition 1 voltage circuit is supplied by the run/crank relay through a fuse, and is used to power the remaining internal ECM circuits. If the ECM detects a voltage difference between the 2 ignition 1 voltage circuits, DTC P1682 will set.


Read more: http://engine-codes.com/p1682_chevrolet.html#ixzz3Djm8K11C

Sep 19, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What is code 42 for a pontiac 6000 and what do i do to fix it


. This is a common code that is often difficult to diagnose and scan tools can't help. The following understanding of how the electronic spark timing (EST) system works - what is taking place and why - is a big step toward a quicker and easier diagnosis of this circuit. When the engine is turning over, but below the run threshold of 400 RPM, the ECM holds the module's bypass voltage too low (0 volts) to energize its solid-state switch (ignition module). Another way of looking at the solid-state switch is to think of it as a relay. When voltage is applied, the relay is energized. With no voltage applied, the relay is de-energized. The pick-up coil/crank sensor pulses are amplified and shaped by the ignition module. These pulses are used to complete the circuit creating a magnetic field in the ignition coils primary winding that, when collapsing, will induce a high voltage in the secondary winding. Therefore, for every crank sensor/pick-up pulse, the coil is triggered. This is known as the bypass mode or module mode of operation. In this mode, the engine is running on the timing advance that is built into the ignition module. With the voltage low on the bypass wire, the EST is pulled to ground through a resistor in the ignition module. This keeps the voltage on the EST wire at around 300 mV. When the ECM sees the RPM over the run threshold, it will then apply 5 volts to the bypass wire that will activate the solid-state switch (relay). This in turn will switch the EST from ground to the base of the transistor that controls the primary coil. In this mode, the primary coil winding is being triggered by the altered signal sent out from the ECM. The ECM will alter the signal to the ignition module and control the timing based on the inputs from various sensors. This is referred to as the EST mode. This is how the system is designed to work! Now let's look at some of the things that can cause problems and set a Code 42. Under 400 RPM, no voltage on the bypass wire, the ECM expects to see low voltage (300 mV) on the EST line during this condition. If it sees 0 volts, indicating an open in the EST circuit - or higher than 500 mV - it sets a Code 42 and stays in the bypass mode. If the bypass line is open, or grounded, the ignition module will not switch to the EST mode. The ignition module needs the bypass voltage to activate the solid-state switch so the EST voltage will be low over 400 RPM and a Code 42 will set. If the EST line is grounded, the ignition module will switch to the EST - but because the line is grounded, there will be no EST signal. A Code 42 will set. To check the ignition module to see if the solid-state switch is capable of switching when the 5 volts are applied, the engine should not be running and the ECM connectors should be disconnected. An ohm meter and test light can be used. With the ohm meter on the EST circuit, it should read less that 500 ohms (in some cases, a lot less). Using a test light to battery voltage, probe the bypass wire. With this voltage applied to the bypass wire, the solid-state switch inside the ignition module should switch and the ohm meter on the EST circuit should go over 5,000 ohms. There is also another way to check this with the engine running: by removing the bypass and the EST wire from the module or ECM, run a jumper from the reference wire to the EST circuit. The reference signal is the signal that is used in the bypass mode to trigger the primary coil voltage. Apply 5 volts from one of the 5-volt reference circuits or a test light to battery voltage. This voltage on the bypass wire will activate the solid-state switch, in turn switching the module. On some models, the 5 volts or test light will have to be applied before starting or the motor will stall when the voltage is applied to the bypass. If the module is switching OK, the car will continue to run on the reference signal. If it stalls, the ignition module is not switching properly. There are some other checks that can be made when working with an intermittent Code 42. When using a digital volt ohm meter (DVOM), there should be 5 volts on the bypass wire. On the EST wire, with the engine running, there will be close to 2.3 volts. The EST is a 5 volt on/off digital signal, so with a volt meter you will see the average of the high and the low. With the EST signal being a digital on/off signal, if you have a meter that will read in Hz, you can also pick up a Hz reading on the EST wire. Normally, you will see about 28 Hz with the engine idling and will increase with RPM. If the EST circuit would become momentarily grounded, or open, the engine will cut out. The voltage reading will jump down to as low as 1.3 volts and the Hz reading will jump from as low as 17 to 128 Hz. If there is a problem in the EST circuit, the voltage on the bypass wire will not change. If the bypass wire is momentarily grounded or open, the reading on the EST wire will be the same as if it was grounding or going open, but unlike a problem on the EST circuit, the bypass voltage will be pulled low if it becomes grounded or goes open. If this happens fast enough, the engine will cut out. The voltages will vary, but the SES light will not come on and no codes will be set. With the EST circuit open, engine running, the voltage will stay low on the bypass wire and the ECM will not put out the 5 volts. With the EST shorted to ground, the voltage on the bypass wire will be high (5 volts) for a very short time (three seconds or less) then the ECM will remove the 5 volts. Using a min/max on the DVOM is the best way to see this voltage. With the bypass open, the EST circuit OK, the ECM will put out the 5 volts. By using a DVOM on both the EST and bypass wire, you can tap on the ECM, wiggle and tug on the wiring to see if the voltage or Hz reading will change. If it does, this is an indication that you have located the problem area.

Mar 17, 2010 | 1987 Pontiac 6000

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