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99 suburban says low input to tps has fast idle around 1600 rpms volts from pcm are 10.5 what could my problem be also get same voltage on map and evap emissions

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 1,007 Answers

Check the throttle position sensor operation with a multimeter. Check that the ohms resistance is smooth throughout the range of the sensor's operation. If you are seeing any spikes and sudden drops in resistance throughout the movement of the sensor, then this could be your issue.


Please report.

Posted on Nov 05, 2012

  • jayjay Nov 05, 2012

    have already changed the tps out still same faults low and high input

  • jayjay Nov 10, 2012

    also took both old and new sensor purchased and installed on another truck they work perfectly

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This may be the result of a faulty catalatic converter, get the exhaust checked out as My 97 caddy had simialr readings. Good luck

Posted on Nov 19, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 2002 nissan altima p0507 idle problem

I had the same problem before. after using the scanner i got a code number P0507. "Idle Air Control", New 2002 and up Nissan models like my Altima don't have an idle valve or sensor like older models to be replace. Here's the solution " Replace your "Throttle Chamber" the idle sensor is build in it, there is no other way to fix this problem. the throttle chamber is about $175.00 at your Nissan Dealer. The need your core or you will need to pay extra money. No need for expensive mechanic shop, you could do this your self. the throttle chamber is so easy to remove, four screws holds it together. I will take you about ten to twenty minutes to replace it. Please trust me and you will save big bucks!!!!!

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

vetteman3002
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SOURCE: 87 CAMARO, 305 ENG. ENGINE VIN CODE 'H'. HAS NO

A vacuum leak could cause a fast idle. Spray starting fluid around the intake manifold and see if the engine revs up. The tps will elevate the idle to keep it running if a vacuum leak is present.

Posted on Oct 17, 2010

johnf1aresti
  • 1098 Answers

SOURCE: codes are reading low tps voltage, mapps high voltage ignition on low voltage at idle. Idle surges sputers and stalls when driving. Replaceed mapp and tps with no improvment?

Have you consider to check the battery power. I believe the main problem you have is either the battery or the alternator. Due to these two things with low voltage the brain ( ECU ) does not have the enough power to work. Good Luck.

Posted on Aug 15, 2012

SOURCE: emission failure on 2001 chevy blazer 4.3-

your vehicle has a vent valve solenoid located on the evap canister under the back end of the vehicle. You most likely have a bad vaccuum line going to the evap caniser. Have the vehicle smoke tested to verify. If no leaks are found replace the vent valve solenoid

Posted on Oct 25, 2012

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2 Answers

2003 dodge grand caravan surging and running rough when accelerating


I recommend you test the tps according to procedure below. Especially step 8. Suspect you will see drop outs in the voltage, which indicate sensor is worn out.
Operation

The Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is mounted to the side of the throttle body and connects to the throttle blade shaft. The TPS is a variable resistor that provides the PCM with an input signal (voltage). The signal represents throttle blade position. As the position of the throttle blade changes, the resistance of the TPS changes.
The PCM supplies about 5 volts of DC current to the TPS. The TPS output voltage (input signal to the PCM) represents throttle blade position. The TPS output voltage to the PCM varies from about 0.5 volt at idle to a maximum of 4.0 volts at wide open throttle. The PCM uses the TPS input, and other sensor input, to determine current engine operating conditions. The PCM also adjusts fuel injector pulse width and ignition timing based on these inputs.
Testing

In order to perform a complete test of the TPS and related circuits, you must use a DRB or equivalent scan tool, and follow the manufacturers directions. To check the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) only, proceed with the following tests.
  1. Visually check the connector, making sure it is attached properly and that all of the terminals are straight, tight and free of corrosion.
  2. The TPS can be tested using a digital ohmmeter. The center terminal of the sensor supplies the output voltage. The outer terminal with the violet/white wire is the 5-volt supply terminal and the black/light blue wire is the sensor ground terminal.
  3. Connect the DVOM between the center terminal and sensor ground.
  4. With the ignition key to the ON position and the engine OFF, check the output voltage at the center terminal wire of the connector.
  5. Check the output voltage at idle and at Wide Open Throttle (WOT):
  6. For 1996 vehicles at idle, the TPS output voltage should be greater than 0.35 volt (0.4 volt for the 2.4L engine). At WOT, the output voltage should be less than 4.5 volts (3.8 volts for the 2.4L engine).
  7. For 1997 and later vehicles at idle, the TPS output voltage should be about 0.38-1.20 volts. At WOT, the output voltage should be about 3.1-4.4 volts.
  8. The output voltage should gradually increase as the throttle plate moves slowly from idle to WOT.
  9. If voltage measures outside these values, replace the TPS.
  10. Before replacing the TPS, check for spread terminals and also inspect the PCM connections.

0996b43f802023e3-xpf45b2xmdrdbg0gt251xk4c-5-0.gif

0996b43f802023e4-xpf45b2xmdrdbg0gt251xk4c-5-5.gif

Jul 26, 2017 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

94 Jeep Cherokee TPS - back feed


You are still getting high or low voltage at tps? What is the voltage and do you have a unstable idle? Put you + lead on terminal 3 and - lead on terminal 1 turn ignition on and check voltage to be at approximately 5 volts. You can also back probe with it connected at center wire and ground probe to a good ground at engine. Turn ignition on it should read between 0.20 - 0.90 slowly manually open throttle it should rise all the way to 4.5 voltd at full open. If its bad change tps if no 5.0 volts from pcm on first test check connections at pcm. The center tps connector supply wire comes from pin 22 and connection 3 ( which is 5 volt supply ) comes from pin 6. You should be able to back probe pin 6 turn ignition on and have 5 volts. If not 5 v brain has problem.

Sep 08, 2014 | 1994 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

What does code PO108 mean on a 2001 Grand Cherokee


wow , you actually tried to look it up, a 1st time here.

the MAP is a baro sensor used to calculate fuel injection RATES.

if you have gross air leaks to the system the engine IDLE screams.

is it?

108 means the voltage is too high.

usually its unplugged, or bad sensor.

otential causes of a P0108 code: Bad MAP sensor Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor Engine vacuum leak Short on signal wire to PCM Short on reference voltage wire from PCM Open in ground circuit to MAP Worn engine causing low vacuum



Bad MAP sensor Leak in vacuum supply line to MAP sensor Engine vacuum leak Short on signal wire to PCM Short on reference voltage wire from PCM Open in ground circuit to MAP Worn engine causing low vacuum



http://www.obd-codes.com/p0108



and last. but before ECU.

low engine compression, is 1 more, causes , many



what i do is reseat the MAP sensor

i then make sure he vacuum port is not clogged. (both sides)

i then measure the output , keyon, and idle and gunning throttle.

any Voltmeter works here,

key on is 5v or near.

idle 1.8v

gun engine as the RPMs fall like a rock the volts tries to hit 0.5vdc.



http://www.fixkick.com/look/odds-ends/jeep/MAP-sensor-output-real.jpg



very very easy to find with a voltmeter

if the meter agrees with vacuum gage, then the MAP is ok

and you have air leaks or low vacuum for (VAST reasons)

ask.

Aug 19, 2014 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Where is the thorttleposition sensor on 2001jeep cherokee


The 3 wire Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is mounted on the throttle body and is connected to the throttle blade.
The TPS is a 3wire variable resistor that provides the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) with an input signal (voltage) that represents the throttle blade position of the throttle body. The sensor is connected to the throttle blade shaft. As the position of the throttle blade changes, the resistance (output voltage) of the TPS changes.
The PCM supplies approximately 5 volts to the TPS. The TPS output voltage (input signal to the PCM) represents the throttle blade position. The PCM receives an input signal voltage from the TPS. This will vary in an approximate range of from .26 volts at minimum throttle opening (idle), to 4.49 volts at wide-open throttle. Along with inputs from other sensors, the PCM uses the TPS input to determine current engine operating conditions. In response to engine operating conditions, the PCM will adjust fuel injector pulse width and ignition timing.
The PCM needs to identify the actions and position of the throttle blade at all times. This information is needed to assist in performing the following calculations:

selectachapter.gif

Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, 1999-2005
Throttle Position Sensor

Print


Operation

The 3 wire Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is mounted on the throttle body and is connected to the throttle blade.
The TPS is a 3wire variable resistor that provides the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) with an input signal (voltage) that represents the throttle blade position of the throttle body. The sensor is connected to the throttle blade shaft. As the position of the throttle blade changes, the resistance (output voltage) of the TPS changes.
The PCM supplies approximately 5 volts to the TPS. The TPS output voltage (input signal to the PCM) represents the throttle blade position. The PCM receives an input signal voltage from the TPS. This will vary in an approximate range of from .26 volts at minimum throttle opening (idle), to 4.49 volts at wide-open throttle. Along with inputs from other sensors, the PCM uses the TPS input to determine current engine operating conditions. In response to engine operating conditions, the PCM will adjust fuel injector pulse width and ignition timing.
The PCM needs to identify the actions and position of the throttle blade at all times. This information is needed to assist in performing the following calculations:


Ignition timing advance Fuel injection pulse-width Idle (learned value or minimum TPS) Off-idle (0.06 volt) Wide Open Throttle (WOT) open loop (2.608 volts above learned idle voltage) Deceleration fuel lean out Fuel cutoff during cranking at WOT (2.608 volts above learned idle voltage) A/C WOT cutoff (certain automatic transmissions only)


Removal & Installation

3.7L & 4.0L

  1. Disconnect TPS electrical connector.
  2. Remove TPS mounting screws.
  3. Remove TPS.

To Install:
The TPS is mounted to the throttle body. The throttle shaft end of throttle body slides into a socket in the TPS. The TPS must be installed so that it can be rotated a few degrees. (If sensor will not rotate, install sensor with throttle shaft on other side of socket tangs). The TPS will be under slight tension when rotated.
  1. Install TPS and retaining screws.
  2. Tighten screws to 7 Nm (60 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Connect TPS electrical connector to TPS.
  4. Manually operate throttle (by hand) to check for any TPS binding before starting engine.

4.7L
  1. Remove air duct and air resonator box at throttle body.
  2. Disconnect TPS electrical connector.
  3. Remove two TPS mounting bolts (screws).
  4. Remove TPS from throttle body.

To Install:
The throttle shaft end of throttle body slides into a socket in TPS. The TPS must be installed so that it can be rotated a few degrees. If sensor will not rotate, install sensor with throttle shaft on other side of socket tangs. The TPS will be under slight tension when rotated.
  1. Install TPS and two retaining bolts.
  2. Tighten bolts to 7 Nm (60 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Manually operate throttle control lever by hand to check for any binding of TPS.
  4. Connect TPS electrical connector to TPS.
  5. Install air duct/air box to throttle body.

Hope this helps

Dec 31, 2011 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

95 cadillac reading code current p105 sometimes engine light comes on sometimes harder to start than normal, idles up and down up on stopping


Symptoms Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination
Causes A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP Sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP Sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM
Possible Solutions Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).
NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened
If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:
NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105
  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.
Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Jun 17, 2011 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Code po105 pops up i had it reset and every 3-4 days it lights back up what does it mean ?


Generic code results from http://www.obd-codes.com/p0105 :

P0105 - MAP Circuit Malfunction

Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

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Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:

  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

A P0105 DTC could be caused by:

  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM

Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Feb 27, 2011 | Jaguar X-Type Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have this eobd code problem p0105 in my elantra, where those sensors?


P0105 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


LOCATIONS:
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor: The MAP sensor is located against the firewall to the left side of the engine.
Barometric Pressure Sensor: This sensor is installed on the VAF sensor; Volume Air Flow Sensor Is located in the air intake plenum assembly.

Hope this helps.

Jan 24, 2011 | 2001 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

I have a p0105 error. They say this is a dirty body throttle. How can I clean this myself? My car is a 2002 Chevy Envoy.


DTC P0105 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction or Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction


What does that mean?
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms: Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jul 09, 2010 | 2002 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

Car starts has no power until the gas pedal is almost to the floor. In 2nd the tach is at 3500 rpm and won't shift until i let up on the gas. It also hesitates and is using more gas than usuall.


Check the TPS (Throttle position sensor) wire lead and replace the TPS if any signs of damage or failure.

The Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is used to send input signals to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) to indicate the current angle of the throttle blade.

Theory/Operation:
This sensor is a variable resistor that has a 5 volt reference signal applied to it by the PCM. The TPS sends signals back to the PCM in the range of approximately 1 to 4 volts, depending upon the throttle shaft angle. The PCM uses these input voltages to determine the current position of the throttle.
The PCM uses the voltage signals from the TPS and other input sensors to determine the proper air/fuel mixture and ignition timing for certain operating conditions. Some of these operating conditions are: acceleration, deceleration, idle, and wide open throttle.


Typical Readings:
An input voltage of approximately 1 volt indicates a minimum throttle opening, idle, or deceleration condition. An input voltage of approximately 2 volts indicates a cruise or light acceleration condition. An input voltage of approximately 4 volts would indicate a maximum throttle opening or wide open throttle condition.
NOTE: The following procedure tests the TPS only.
  1. The TPS can be tested with an analog voltmeter. The center terminal of the TPS is the output terminal.
  2. With the ignition key in the ON position, check the TPS output voltage at the center terminal wire of the connector. Check this at idle (throttle plate closed), and at wide open throttle (WOT).
    • At idle, TPS output voltage should be approximately one volt. The output voltage should increase gradually as the throttle plate is slowly opened from idle to WOT.
    • At wide open throttle, TPS output should be approximately 4.5 volts.
As always, check the service manual for the proper procedures and specifications for your particular vehicle.

Thank you using Fixya and good luck.

Mar 08, 2010 | 2002 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

Intermittent: car will not accelerate when cold. No diagnostic code


1. Inspect the 2 wire harness for the 7x Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor in the rear of the block.

2. Wiggle tug test the harness and inspect the harness for being melted from the exhaust manifold. Tests/Procedures: 1. Verify fuel pressure climbs to over 40 PSI during cranking and reads about 35-40 PSI at idle. Potential Causes: Insufficient Fuel Pressure
Tech Tips: The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) will idle the engine at a normal speed when the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) voltage returns to the learned base idle value. This is also called 0% throttle angle. If this throttle angle is 1% or more at idle, the PCM will assume the engine is actually off idle and raise the engine speed to prevent a deceleration stall. Note that another sensor using the same 5 volt reference as the TPS can momentarily glitch the reference voltage low. This will cause the TPS to send a lower base idle voltage to the PCM, which the PCM quickly records as the new learned base idle voltage. When the reference voltage returns to 5 volts, the base TPS signal voltage increases to it's previous value. The PCM now interprets this as being off idle. This will cause the throttle angle to increase to 1% (or more) and idle the engine at a fast speed

Oct 13, 2009 | 1998 Pontiac Grand Am

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