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Overbored a cl175 50 thousands .cant get it timed.acts like it is out 180.

Fires when intake valve is open instead of when exhaust valve is open

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 5,278 Answers

You're wrong. It should not fire when the exhaust valve is open-that is the exhaust stroke. As the piston moves down after the exhaust stroke, the intake valve opens and the air-fuel mixture is pulled into the cylinder. Then piston travels up, compressing the mixture( both valves are closed, now), and at the top of this stroke the ignition fires, driving the piston down.
Sounds like your timing is a bit too soon, if it's firing when the intake is open. Try retarding the time just a bit.
If that doesn't work, find tdc of the compression stroke of number one cylinder: pull the sparkplug out and turn the crank around by hand (with a socket on the crank pulley) with your finger over the plug hole. As the crank comes around to the zero mark (TDC), you will feel pressure bui;ld up on your finger if you are on the compression stroke. If you are on the exhaust stroke there will not be pressure buildup as the piston approaches TDC. Once you have number one cylinder at TDC of the compression stroke, the rotor will be pointing to the number one plug wire tower on the distributor cap. If the dist. is off 180, rotor will be pointing opposite of number one.

Posted on Nov 01, 2012

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

chuck943
  • 783 Answers

SOURCE: have 2005 ford freestyle. i towed to my shop,

Measure the exhaust back pressure. Do you have an old O2 sensor? If so just break the ends off of it so that just the tube is left sticking thru the center. Install it in one of the O2 ports and hook a vacuum/pressure guage to it. Should read les than 1 psi at idle and no more than 3 to 4 psi at WOT.

Posted on Feb 19, 2009

  • 383 Answers

SOURCE: have kia sportage 2.0l four cam timing marks,!Whitch one?

gregorykilke: your engine has several references if you are describing the same vehicle. The 1996 KIA Sportage has a SOHC engine and was the last year to use one before they went exclusively to twin cams.
The timing marks are as follows: On the crank, position the crank to where the woodruff key is in the 12:00 position. There is a metal plate with a notch behind the gear. If you look closely at the engine behind the plate, thought the notch, there should be a small "ARROW" which should fall within the notch. If lined up properly, the #1 piston will be at TDC.
On the top end of the engine, your cam gear is numbered 1-2-and 3. Position the cam to where the #2 on the gear is at 12:00. On the back side of that gear, should be a mark which should be running in line with the # 2 and it is the "Match mark which you line up with the small arrow or "V" on the cover.
A word of caution! This is an interference fit engine which means it BENDS VALVES IF YOU DON'T HAVE THE TIMING CORRECT AND YOU HAVE BEEN SPINNING THE ENGINE OVER!
IF>>>you are lucky, you might not have had the timing too far off and the valves may be fine, but exercise EXTREME caution when setting up the valve timing.
One way to avoid bending valves, is to make sure none of the pistons are at or close to TDC. This way, you can roll the cam in position and then watch which direction is going to bring the #1 piston up and whether it is rotating the engine clockwise or counter clockwise to bring the piston to that position , it won't harm anything. IF you feel any resistance at all STOP!!!!!! because the timing is off and you will bend valves.
Make sure the tensioner pulley bearing turns smoothly and makes no noise. DO NOT WASH IT WITH SOLVENT OR SPRAY IT OFF WITH CARB SPRAY! The solvent will get inside the sealed bearing area and contaminate the lubricant causing a premature bearing failure and a potential disaster for your engine!
Should you need further assistance on this subject, just ask and I'll do what I can to help. The belt tension is also CRITICAL!
Take care guy, Give the folks at FIXYA some input if I am doing you any good or if I have helped anyone else, write in and let them know. They want feed back. GOOD LUCK!

Posted on Apr 09, 2009

  • 260 Answers

SOURCE: putting in new head gaskets, need all of the specs, timing ,

I googled the specs and i found mine it will give numbers and pictures. Sorry i couldn't actuall y give u the answer.

Posted on Apr 11, 2009

ghost4548
  • 776 Answers

SOURCE: timing slipped will it bend intake, exhaust or both sets of valve

First of all, you'll want to perform what's called a 'LEAK-DOWN' test. The assumption you make (regarding Intake versus exhaust) is irrevelant. Interferrence is BOTH intake and exhaust valve clearances. A leak down or "cylinder leakage" test is similar to a compression test in that it tells you how well your engine's cylinders are sealing. But instead of measuring pressure, it measures pressure loss.
A leak down test requires the removal of all the spark plugs. The crankshaft is then turned so that each piston is at top dead center (both valves closed) when each cylinder is tested. Some people start with cylinder number one and follow the engine's firing order.
A threaded coupling attached to a leakage gauge is screwed into a spark plug hole. Compressed air (80 to 90 psi) is then fed into the cylinder. You don't have to use that much pressure... you can use 30 psi... percentages are the same.
An engine in great condition should generally show only 5 to 10% leakage. An engine that's still in pretty good condition may show up to 20% leakage. But more than 30% leakage indicates trouble.
The neat thing about a leakage test (as opposed to a compression test) is that it's faster and easier to figure out where the pressure is going. If you hear air coming out of the tailpipe, it indicates a leaky exhaust valve. Air coming out of the throttle body or carburetor would point to a leaky intake valve. Air coming out of the breather vent or PCV valve fitting would tell you the rings and/or cylinders are worn.
A leakage test can also be used in conjunction with a compression test to diagnose other kinds of problems.
A cylinder that has poor compression, but minimal leakage, usually has a valvetrain problem such as a worn cam lobe, broken valve spring, collapsed lifter, bent push rod, etc.
If all the cylinders have low compression, but show minimal leakage, the most likely cause is incorrect valve timing. The timing belt or chain may be off a notch or two.
If compression is good and leakage is minimal, but a cylinder is misfiring or shows up weak in a power balance test, it usually indicates a fuel delivery (bad injector) or ignition problem (fouled spark plug or bad plug wire). These are not ABSOLUTE conclusions -- each assumption must be VERIFIED before concluding anything. You mentioned "the lifters seem to be collapsed."... Did you VERIFY this? Since you KNOW the engine is OUT - OF - TIME because you KNOW the timing belt has SLIPPED, then you know you must PUT IT BACK IN TIME... right?...before you can continue diagnosis.... right? Otherwise, what are you MEASURING?

Posted on Jun 25, 2009

  • 3600 Answers

SOURCE: 1993 nissan pickup 2.4 liter back firing just

Loosen the valves up and reset valve clearance and since it is blowing out the exhaust there is 3 things it can be, timing belt, or chain or valves to tight or distrbutor is off. My guess is you put the chain on and it slipped 3 or 4 teeth and is backfireing threw the exhaust. If you need more help post here and I will help.

Posted on Aug 28, 2009

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2 Answers

95 dodge dakota back fires above 2000 rpm


A tune-up is always a good idea. Is the system running rich or lean? Any applicable trouble codes? Is it back firing out the exhaust? If so, I got two thoughts, either an exhaust system problem or exhaust valves?

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I have a 2003 mazda 6 with 2.3 i think it might be out of time but i cant find the timing marks on the pulleys


Sir. The only other way to know your on no one cylinder top dead center is to take the numbers of the firing order,
White them down with the first 3 in one colum and the second three firing numbers in a colum next to the first three. The numbers across from each other are called " mating cylinders".
If #1 cylinder is ( example ) next to #6 on your paper, then those two are mating cylinders. Meaning one ( with valve cover/s off) will , when engine in turned over slowly, will be on valve overlap, while its mating cylinder is on
Top Dead Center to fire. In valve overlap, when the motor is turned slowly one way, the exhaust valve will open and when engine is slowly turned the other way, the intake valve starts to open. At that point when either exhaust or intake valve is moving on #6 cylinder valve trane, #1 is at top dead center which will be not even 180degrees out, but top dead center on #1 cylinder. Now your at the firing point of #1, which will coincide with the rotor pointing at #1 plug wire on the distributor cap. In essence, static ( not
engine running ) the rotor bug should be about 17 degrees early in the cap. This makes up for slack in any timing chain and gear slack between the distributor gear to cam gear. This when running put you about 4-6 degrees advanced. Computor models will time it for itself. See example below.
1 - 6
5 - 2
3 - 4
If your timing order is 153624 then use the chart. As you list your order on paper, remember one mating number is firing and it's mating cylinder is on valve overlap. 180 deg out would be
#1 valves " rocking " and no 6 is on compression. When a cylinder is on the compression stroke, valves will not move. ( both closed ). So, write down your timing order, v6 or inline 6, or 4 cyl or 8 cylinder. It don't matter. If you look at the manifold , it will give the timing order, maybe on the head or Internet. Two columns, walla.
Hope that helps get you to true #1 top dead center. This system is the only true way, along with a cardboard timing wheel for the crank if needed , to adjust valves, lifters and know where the engine is at all times.
Hope that helps. Sorry for the detail, engines are really very simple, once you " get the picture ". Don't make it to difficult. Crank turns two times to one revolution of the cam.
Terry

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I bought a 1984 chevy 350 engine from a salvage yard that ran but never ran right. Come to find out it had a bad exhaust valve. we took the head off blew it out and replaced the valve and put the head back...


If you have a weak spark it will not start since under compression it takes a much stronger spark to jump the gap as compared to a spark in normal air pressure. Try a good known working coil.

Mar 29, 2017 | 1985 Chevrolet El Camino

1 Answer

How to adjust travel


1 intake down
2 compress up
3 power stroke down
4 exhaust up




if you start with you start with the piston just a couple of degrees past TDC (top dead center) so that it has started its return down


now set the valves so they are closed:
if you have an adjustable valve clearance's then your clearances should be noticeable like 10 thousands ( you should be able to move the lifter ( rocker arm ) and it will be loose up and down


with the spark plug still out; so you can see the piston coming to TDC and passing it to come down


turn the flywheel and watch the strokes and the condition of the valves


1 just past tdc, the intake valve opens and the piston goes down for the intake stroke


2. jst as the piston comes around BDC the intake valve should close and return to tdc with all valves closed ( the compression stroke )


3 just past TDC the ignition will fire and the piston will return down with both valves closed( the power stroke)


4 just past BDC the exhaust valve opend , the piston travels up and completes the exgaust stroke.




and after completing the exhause stroke and arriving at tdc the intake valve opens and you start over again 1,2,3,4

Sep 12, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

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I have a 2003 mitsubishi Galant thats not starting after replacing the timing belt ,now i cant seem to put it back on timing. please help!!!


You timing may be 180 degrees off, meaning that the spark is being sent on the exhaust stroke instead of the intake stroke.

Jul 11, 2011 | 2002 Mitsubishi Galant

1 Answer

Timing idler pully bearing flew apart going 70.replaced itand timing beltbut it still acts like the timing is off.


Sounds like the belt is off a tooth on the cam or crank sprocket, go back over your work closely, this is an easy thing to have happen to even the best of them all.
Remove # 1 plug turn over till the piston is top, both intake and exhaust are closed, next line up your timing marks, possible you may have it 180 out?
Lots of techs get #1 piston up but dont look to see if the intake and exhaust valves are closed.... if the valves are not both closed you are not up on # 1, both #1 and # 3 will have the intake and exhaust vales closed when you are on the real #1, #1 and #3 are companion cylinders as #2 and #4 are in the firing order having #1 piston up and only one valve closed throughs you completely off that is why it is recommende to pull tghe valve cover off and check the 1 and 3 companion cylinders for proof positive you are on #1.
Good luck!!!

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My crank shaft is rotating twise the crank shaft. HOW MY 1342 FIRING WILL OCCURE?, I can spare only 30 digree for charge and spark plug contact. THERE ARE ONLY 2+2 CYLINDER. 180 DIGREE APPART KINDLY REPLY...


Your crankshaft turns 2x times the camshaft. Put it this way as # 1 cylinder reaches TDC (top dead center) of the firing/compression stroke, and this will be after a (8 degs BTDC) spark to ignite the air/fuel mix, the # 3 cyl. will be at BDC of the intake stroke and as #1 begins its power down stroke, (during explosion of air/fuel mix), #3 begins its compression up stroke, the #4 cyl. will be coming down with #1 cyl. but #4 will be in the beginning of its intake down stroke, and #2 cyl. will be coming up with #3 but #2will be in its BDC of the exhaust stroke. Which has just fired previously to #1. 1342134213421342 etc. Now the cam turns to open / close the valves; In the outline above, #1 cyl. valves will both be closed. #3 cyl. will have the intake starting to close at this point. #4 cyl. will just be starting to open its intake valve, and #2 will be starting to open its exhaust valve. Is all this clear as mud? So as the crank makes one full rotation (in a 4cyl. engine) only the firing of one cylinder has happened.and at every rotation one cyl. will fire. So #1 at TDC then one full rotation, #1 back at TDC, but this TDC is half of its 4 cycles, (1)Intake, (2)compression, (3)power, (4)exhaust. this 1234 refers to the 4 cycles of the rotation not firing order.

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Replaced head gaskets now it wont start


You could be off time by 180 degrees. The crank turns twice for every one turn of the camshaft. To double check take off the vale cover for #1 pistonand turn the engine by hand a little way past top dead center and see which valve opens. It should be the exhaust valve. If it's not, simply rotate the engine until you see the intake open and start to close and line up your timing marks from there. Then reposition your distributor so that it is in line to fire on that cylinder. Hope this helps.

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are you on the right stroke? If it is not tdc on compression stroke it will not ever start. You have tdc 3 different times, once on intake, exhaust, and compression. I bet that is your problem, must be on tdc on compression!

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