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What type of primary circuit switching device is used on a waste spark ignition?

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1984 jeep cj7 258 I changed ign control module but still no spark what's the next move?


Did you check primary voltage to ignition coil? Goes hot with the key on, should be a red wire. If no voltage have to check wiring circuit and ignition switch. Primary voltage is just 12 volts, use a test light.

Nov 20, 2015 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2008 jeep code p2302 mean


do you want me to guess?
or do you want DIY testing advice.
mean, it means bad spark, from Ign.coil 1, (2 cyl wasted spark)

DIY , actual tests... per FSM. get one.
only 1 code. and comes back after clearing it?
full scan done?
how many miles on it, when was the last full tune up
page 412 opr, guide in glove box , did you do the 102k mile service?
new spark plugs and 6v wire sets? , now be the the time
not a new coil pack that be last choice.

p2 means factory code, and seems your scan tool works right.
many dont. or are blind to them or get them all wrong.

same car as my main car... JK,
i have the full JK, FSM. factory service manual, go it day 2.
the first thing to do, when doing DIY , is to open the hood
and see what engine you have, as diff, engines have diffr, EFI systems.
mine has the Trenton 3.8L V6. with MAP and TBW system.
TBW is throttle by wire. (map sensor is for speed density system)

P2302
P= powertrain
2= jeep private code, not USA fed, spec EPA codes.
3= Fuel and Air Metering (Injector Circuit)
02= Ignition Coil 1 Secondary Circuit- Insufficient Ionization

02= Ignition Coil 1 Secondary Circuit- Insufficient Ionization

this car has a coil pack and is WASTED SPARK
3 coils 6 spark plugs. wasted. (google what that means)
but is important to know because either spark plug can disturb
the current path here.

if my 6v did this, id do the 102k mile service. with NGK parts,.
or Bosch.

we , usually you get P03xx codes with it. misfire.

i open my fsm ,there are 6 tests. for this 1 failure
it says the spark duration is too short or nothing at all.
ill not type out all 6 tests nor the logic, (alldata.com has it)
step 1 is to :
clear all DTC
and key on (no start)
scan it, do you get 2302? now, not running,
that is correct the ecu test coil primary , before running, amazing,
if yes, the next steps are to see if the coil is bad (open primary)
or the ASD drive is dead.




Jan 19, 2014 | 2008 Jeep Wrangler

1 Answer

Vauxhall engine


The ignition system is responsible for the starting engine:
the primary circuite is battery, ignition switch, ignition contact, condenser, ballast resistor. The secondary circuite. provide high tension to fire the spark plugs, add ignitioncoil, distributor, cap, rotoretc, high tension wiring, spark plugs. Test the mayor problem: 1) contact points and 2) coil.IF the ignition system do not provde the 20,000 or 30,000 volts, for spark plugs, will not work.

Easy test carefully:use screwdriver with the spark plug cables put around about 1/4 of inch againt the chassis give ignition, and some spark is coming, test by each spark plug cables, IF do not the coil can be faulty.

God bless you

May 09, 2012 | Vauxhall Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine no spark


If the engine has no spark, check for voltage at the coil positive terminal when the ignition key is on.
If there is voltage, the problem is on the trigger side of the coil (pickup, crank sensor, ignition module or primary wiring circuit).
If there is NO voltage at the coil, the problem is on the supply side (the ignition switch or ignition wiring circuit).

Apr 22, 2012 | 1998 Dodge Ram 1500 4WD

1 Answer

I have no spark in cylinders 2,4,6 on my 2002 Ford escape and three codes 354,355,356 Which means the same . After checkin those Three coils I found out , there is no negative Any advise?


P0354 - Ignition Coil D Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction.

Description of DTC:
The ignition signal from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) or Electronic Control Module(ECM) is sent to and amplified by the power transistor. The power transistor turns ON and OFF the ignition coil primary circuit. This ON/OFF operation induces the proper high voltage in the coil secondary circuit.

Symptoms:
- Lack/Loss of Power
- The engine may be harder to start
- Engine hesitation
- Check Engine Light On
- No spark

Possible Causes:
- Open or short in the ignition coil circuit
- Ignition coil circuit shorted to ground
- Ignition coil connector
- Damaged ignition coil
- Damaged PCM or ECM

Possible Solutions:
- If damage, repair ignition coil circuit
- Replace ignition coil
- Replace PCM or ECM



P0355 - Ignition Coil E Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction.

P0356 - Ignition Coil F Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction.

Jan 18, 2011 | 2002 Ford Escape

2 Answers

Enging code came up on my 2004 dodge ram 1500 5.7 Hemi. Said ignition coil E was bad and that I had a misfire in cylinder 3. Replaced coil at cylinder 3 but it's still running rough. Is coil E somewhere...


Have you checked the spark plug itself? --- 5.7L Engine To Remove:
NOTE: Note spark plug cable original positions before removing.
dod_ram15_57_ign_coil.gif

dod_ram15_57_ign_coil_loc.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Clean the area around the coil with compressed air.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Battery negative cable
    • Throttle body air intake tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Coil electrical connector by moving slide lock and pressing on release lock
    • Secondary high-voltage cable from coil
    • Mounting bolts
    • Coil from cylinder head opening by twisting
To Install:
  1. Clean area around spark plugs with compressed air.
  2. Apply dielectric grease to inside of boots.
  3. Install or connect the following:
    • Ignition coil to cylinder head opening
    • 2 mounting bolts
      1. Torque to: 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm)
    • Coil electrical connector
    • Cable to coil
    • Throttle body air tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Battery negative cable
---
Distributorless Ignition System General Information This vehicle uses two different types of ignition systems. The 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines do not use a conventional distributor. The 5.9L engine uses a conventional distributor. The ignition system is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) on all engines. Procedures in this section are for the 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines; please see the section on Distributor Ignition Systems for procedures for the 5.9L engine.
Distributorless ignition systems (EI) are used on many current engines. This system uses the waste spark method for distributing secondary voltage. In a waste spark system, an individual coil is used to fire one pair of engine cylinders simultaneously. These cylinders are known as companions, since each of their pistons is at TDC at the same time. On a typical V6 engine for example, cylinder 1 is at TDC compression while cylinder 4 is at TDC exhaust. This is also true of cylinders 2 and 5 as well as cylinder 3 and 6.
The cylinder on the compression stroke is known as the event cylinder, while the cylinder on the exhaust stroke is called the waste cylinder. Since secondary resistance is very low in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke, little voltage is required to fire the plug. For this reason, the majority of available voltage is consumed by the cylinder on the compression stroke.
One spark plug is attached to each end of the secondary coil winding via the spark plug wires. This series circuit arrangement causes one of the plugs to fire in a forward direction (center electrode to outer electrode), and the other spark plug to fire in a reverse direction (outer electrode to center electrode). The firing voltage requirements on the waste spark ignition are significantly greater than a traditional ignition system primarily because it takes 30% more energy to fire a plug reverse polarity. When a spark plug is fired backwards, it fires from the outer electrode to the center electrode. This is a high resistance path since the electrons do not flow as easily from a cold, dull surface such as the outer electrode to a hot, sharp surface like the center electrode.
Since the coil and plugs are arranged in a series circuit, a typical plug gap of .050" results in a total gap of .100" for the whole circuit that includes two spark plugs for the companion cylinders. The waste spark can overcome this added resistance by producing high secondary output voltages due to low resistance in the primary winding. Another reason higher secondary ignition voltage is required is cylinder pressure; specifically, the lack of it. Generally, event cylinders require 10 to 12-kV to initiate current flow across the spark plug gap, while only 2 - 3-kV is needed to fire the waste cylinder. Therefore, the air gap in the waste cylinder creates no more resistance than the rotor gap does in a conventional ignition system.
There are two different methods used for coil trigger. One method sends the crankshaft sensor signal directly to the ignition module to activate the coils, while the other sends the crankshaft sensor signal to the PCM and the PCM controls ignition operation either directly or through a separate ignition module.
Waste spark ignition advantages
  • It has fewer components than conventional distributor-type ignition systems.
  • No mechanical adjustments to set ignition timing.
  • No mechanical load (turning the distributor shaft).
  • No unwanted timing variations caused by gear lash or other worn distributor components.
Another advantage of waste spark is longer coil life. To illustrate this point, consider a six-cylinder engine with conventional ignition. At 3000 RPM, the coil must fire 9000 times per minute. This is calculated by dividing the engine speed by 2, since the cam turns at half crank speed, and then multiplying the distributor RPM by the total number of engine cylinders.
In contrast, the coils on a six-cylinder engine with waste spark only work a third as hard. This is because there's a coil for every two cylinders and each coil fires every crankshaft revolution. This means that at 3000 RPM, the coils only fire 3000 times per minute. This allows each coil to operate with less dwell (time that the coil is energized), resulting in less heat buildup and longer life.
Coil Over Plug System The coil over plug system was developed so that spark and spark timing could be better controlled on an individual cylinder basis. Each cylinder has an ignition coil mounted directly above the spark plug on the cylinder head cover. A short suppresser/connector replaces the spark plug wire and links the coil to the plug. There are different methods used for primary triggering. Some manufacturers use a combination coil/module, which means each coil has its own control circuit that is activated by the PCM. Others use remote mounted modules to trigger the coils.
Each individual coil is allowed to saturate while all other cylinders fire. For a V-8 engine, this allows a period of seven firing events for coil saturation, compared to three events for the same V-8 engine with a waste spark system. The coil over plug system also benefits from a minimum amount of energy lost, due to the resistance of spark plug wires.
Coil Near Plug System The coil near plug system also features multiple ignition coils. An ignition coil/module is mounted in proximity of each cylinder. There is a short length of spark plug wire between the coil and the spark plug.
Each ignition coil/module has its own control circuit and is activated sequentially by the PCM. All timing decisions are made by the PCM. This includes both ignition timing and duration of the spark.

Nov 03, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

1 Answer

Cant find wer the spark plugs for a 2001 hyundia sonota


Could be a cover over the spark plugs or plugs have coil on plug system: Ignition System WARNING
To avoid personal injury and/or vehicle damage, refer to the service precautions at the beginning of this section.
General Information NOTE: For information on understanding electricity and troubleshooting electrical circuits, please refer to chassis electrical.
Coil on Plug (COP) System
The coil over plug system was developed so that spark and spark timing could be better controlled on an individual cylinder basis. Each cylinder has an ignition coil mounted directly above the spark plug on the cylinder head cover. A short suppresser/connector replaces the spark plug wire and links the coil to the plug. There are different methods used for primary triggering. Some manufacturers use a combination coil/module, which means each coil has its own control circuit that is activated by the PCM. Others use remote mounted modules to trigger the coils.
Each individual coil is allowed to saturate while all other cylinders fire. For a V-8 engine, this allows a period of seven firing events for coil saturation, compared to three events for the same V-8 engine with a waste spark system. The coil over plug system also benefits from a minimum amount of energy lost, due to the resistance of spark plug wires.
Distributor System
If a distributor is not keyed for installation with only one orientation, it could have been removed and installed improperly and then rewired. The new wiring arrangement would maintain the correct firing order, but could change the relative placement of the plug towers in relation to the engine. For this reason it is imperative that you label all wires before disconnecting any of them. Also, before removal, compare the current wiring with the accompanying illustrations. If the current wiring does not match, make notes of the current plug wire locations and orientation of the distributor cap.
Magnetic Sensor / Pick-Up Coil
The magnetic sensor in electronic ignition system is made up of a small coil of wire wrapped around an iron core, a permanent magnet and a toothed wheel called a reluctor. These sensors can be found mounted in a distributor, or at the front, middle, or rear of the crankshaft or camshaft, and are two-wire sensors.
The permanent magnet produces a magnetic field that passes thru the center of the pick-up coil. As the reluctor turns, the small teeth enter the magnetic field. Because the metal is a better conductor for the field than the air between the magnet and reluctor, the field strength begins to increase and reaches its maximum when the reluctor teeth are closest to the sensor. An increase in magnetic field induces a positive voltage to the module. As the teeth leave the magnetic field, the decrease in pole strength induces a negative voltage into the module. This alternating positive and negative voltage causes a small AC current. This alternating current after passing through an analog/digital converter is used by the module or engine controller to trigger the primary circuit.
Hall-Effect Device
Another device that can be used to create a triggering signal is a hall-effect device. A hall-effect device can be thought of as a solid-state On/Off switch. The hall-effect switch is a three-wire device that must receive a power and ground. The hall-effect switch is used in conjunction with an interrupter ring with a series of slots or openings cut into it. Depending on the application, these slots are spaced around the ring in a specific configuration. As the ring rotates, the slots pass between the hall-effect switch, and alternately turns the voltage off and on. When a slot aligns with the hall-effect switch, the controller sees voltage on the signal line. When the area between slots passes the hall-effect switch, the signal is pulled low. This results in a voltage of 0V–0.1V at the controller.
The rotation of the interrupter ring causes the signal to toggle, which causes a continual series of digital pulses on the signal line. This digital pulse is the timing signal that is used by the ignition module or engine computer to open and close the primary circuit. The controller processes these pulses as the RPM signal.
Photo-Optical
Another device used to create a triggering signal is the photo optical sensor. Inside the distributor, there are pick-ups called the Reference pick-up and the Sync pick-up. Each pick-up has a Light Emitting Diode (LED) and a phototransistor. A slotted disc rotates between the pick-ups. The pair of LED’s and phototransistors generates crankshaft position and RPM signals (high and low-resolution signals). The LED’s are powered by a 9- or 12-volt source (depending on manufacturer). Each phototransistor is used to turn a 5-volt signal from the engine controller on and off.
If we look at the optical distributor used in the Chrysler 3.0L engine as an example, there are two areas of slots cut into the disc. The outer diameter of the disc, which generates the high-resolution signal, contains 350 slots. Each of these slots represents 1 degree of crankshaft rotation. An area of approximately 3/8" with no slots represents the remaining 10 degrees. The inner portion of the disc is the low-resolution signal and contains six 60-degree slots. Each of these slots represents the piston’s top dead center position for each cylinder. The controller uses the high-resolution signal to regulate spark timing up to 1200 RPM. This ensures timing accuracy, since crankshaft speed fluctuations are most likely to occur because of the firing pulses during cranking and idle. The low-resolution signal is used for injector firing, as well as ignition timing above 1200 RPM.
As the slots pass between the LED’s and the phototransistors, the transistors are toggled on and off. This occurs as the light beams from the LED’s are alternately interrupted. When the light beam from the LED strikes the phototransistor, the transistor turns on. This causes the 5-volt signal to be pulled low (0V–0.1V). When the rotating disc blocks the light beam, the transistor turns off. This causes the 5-volt signal to remain high.
Ignition Coil
The heart of the automotive ignition system is the ignition coil. The ignition coil is a step-up transformer, since it boosts battery voltage to the high voltage that is necessary for proper combustion.
The ignition coil consists of a primary winding and secondary winding wrapped around a soft iron core. The primary winding is made up of several hundred turns of heavy wire, while the secondary winding consists of thousands of turns of fine wire. The iron core is used to conduct magnetic lines of force efficiently.
When current flows through the primary winding, a magnetic field is created. The more time current is permitted to flow, the stronger the magnetic field becomes. When the current is turned off, the magnetic field collapses causing a high voltage to be induced in the secondary winding through the process of induction.
A few hundred volts will be generated in the primary winding because of the collapsing magnetic field across the heavy primary wire. However, as the magnetic lines of force cut across the thousands of turns of fine wire in the secondary, a far greater voltage is produced. The production of primary voltage is called self-induction, since the primary winding essentially magnifies its own initial voltage when the magnetic field collapses.
Related Symptoms
Faulty ignition system components along with loose connections, bad grounds, high resistance or opens in the circuit, may cause the following symptoms:
  • No start condition
  • Stalling after cold start
  • Stalling after hot start
  • Surging off idle
  • Extended crank time when engine is cold
  • Unstable idle
  • Running rough during off idle acceleration
  • Bucking
  • Hesitation
  • Stumble
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Spark knock

Jul 08, 2010 | 2001 Hyundai Sonata

1 Answer

I have a 2004 Ford Taurus ses with a 3.0 liter v6(not the dohc model either). Today the check engine light came on. I took it to autozone to have the code run and they told me that it could be the primary...


Does the vehicle have coil on plug ignition or coilpack ? And it's not primary or secondary coil malfunctioning It's primary or secondary circuit . I'm assuming it has a coil pack because you say plug wires.
P0350 - Ignition Coil (Undetermined) Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction Each ignition primary circuit is continuously monitored. The test fails when the PCM does not receive a valid IDM pulse signal from the ignition module (integrated in the PCM).
  • Open or short in the Ignition START/RUN circuit.
  • Open coil driver circuit.
  • Coil driver circuit shorted to ground.
  • Damaged coil.
  • Damaged PCM.
  • Coil driver circuit shorted to VPWR.
P0351 - Ignition Coil A Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction See the description for DTC P0350. See the possible causes for DTC P0350.
Pull the spark plugs out an look at them , check the gap ,if too wide replace them . If the spark plug gap gets too worn ,the spark won't jump the gap. It will find the least resistance path to ground ,and it will do it inside the coil . Going from the secondary circuit back to the primary coil an to ground through the PCM - engine computer . The PCM has transistors inside that open an close the primary side to ground ,this builds up a magnetic field around the secondary inducing high voltage spark . Well this can short out the transistor inside the PCM . Most of the time that's what these type codes mean . The PCM would need to be replaced an programmed . This can also damage the catalytic converter. Your best bet , take your vehicle to a qualified repair shop.

Jul 21, 2017 | 2004 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Timing the cams and crank with a belt


  1. Note: Electronic Ignition engine timing is entirely controlled by the PCM. Electronic Ignition engine timing is NOT adjustable. Do not attempt to check base timing. You will receive false readings.

The CKP sensor is used to indicate crankshaft position and speed by sensing a missing tooth on a pulse wheel mounted to the crankshaft. The CMP sensor is used by the COP Integrated EI System to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The PCM uses the CKP signal to calculate a spark target and then fires the coil pack(s) to that target shown in Figure 51. The PCM uses the CMP sensor not shown in Figure 51 on COP Integrated EI Systems to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The coils and coil packs receive their signal from the PCM to fire at a calculated spark target. Each coil within the pack fires two spark plugs at the same time. The plugs are paired so that as one fires during the compression stroke the other fires during the exhaust stroke. The next time the coil is fired the situation is reversed. The COP system fires only one spark plug per coil and only on the compression stroke.

    The PCM acts as an electronic switch to ground in the coil primary circuit. When the switch is closed, battery positive voltage (B+) applied to the coil primary circuit builds a magnetic field around the primary coil. When the switch opens, the power is interrupted and the primary field collapses inducing the high voltage in the secondary coil windings and the spark plug is fired. A kickback voltage spike occurs when the primary field collapses. The PCM uses this voltage spike to generate an Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) signal. IDM communicates information by pulsewidth modulation in the PCM.
  1. The PCM processes the CKP signal and uses it to drive the tachometer as the Clean Tach Out (CTO) signal.

2.5L V6

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by a pulse former within the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition timing is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions based on stored data tables or maps. Once ignition timing has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 5, cylinders 4 and 3 and cylinders 2 and 6) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This ensures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
---------------------------------------------------------------
2.0L 4 cynder

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition angle is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions. Once ignition angle has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 4 and cylinders 3 and 2) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This make sures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Integrated Electronic Ignition System The Integrated Electronic Ignition (EI) System consists of a crankshaft position (CKP) sensor, coil pack(s), connecting wiring, and PCM. The Coil On Plug (COP) Integrated EI System uses a separate coil for each spark plug and each coil is mounted directly onto the plug. The COP Integrated EI System eliminates the need for spark plug wires but does require input from the camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Apr 05, 2009 | 1998 Ford Contour

1 Answer

Po358 ignition coil H primary / secondary circuit malfunction. how do i fix this?


Hi...
On your HUMMER . the CODE P0358. refer to Electrical problem.
Or malfuntion of the ignition coil. cylinder # 7.. The last one in Driver side. Start from Front to Back. The firing order is: Driver side, 1,3,5,7,. Passanger Side 2,4,6,8.
Primary circuit. Is the Spark Plug Wire.
Secondary circuit. Is the Electrical connector on the Ignition Coil.

Check the condition of the Spark plug, Spark plug Wires. and ignition coil. and the ignition coil Electrical connector.

OK.. I hope this help on your problem.
Thank you for use fixya.

Sep 23, 2008 | Hummer H2 Cars & Trucks

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