Question about 2001 Chevrolet Malibu

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I have a 2001 Chevey Malibu with a 3.1 L engine. The cooling fans do not turn on. I have replace the thermostat, the temp sending unit, the low speed and high speed fan relays (although I still get an engine code for that). I have also replaced the overflow recovery tank. The fans do work, they just don't kick on when they are supposed to. The engine will overheat if I let it. What can I do to make the fans come on at proper temp?

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  • Jules Oct 29, 2012

    I will print and test fuses. I will post results. Thanks for the info. I do have one other question. A highly experience mechanic tells me that there is a second temperature sensor, somewhere near the temp sending unit. And he says that the second sensor is the one which tells the ecm to turn on the fans at set engine temp. But I cannot find the second sensor. Does this car have second sensor?

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clifford224
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You checked the relays but did you check all fuses that deal with those relays/fans ? Below are pictures of the fuse box locations and directly below each picture is the fuse layout for that fuse box. I have marked the fuses that you need to check. Alot of people don't check the "PCM BAT" fuse because it doesn't sound as if it deals with the fans but it does. Also the vehicles computer (ECM) have a big part in the fans working as well. If the fuses are good you are going to need to check some wiring. If the relays have numbers on them, you should have power at all times to the number 86 "plugs" in to the fuse panel. That's as far as I can take you at this point. If you need further testing you can reply/comment here or feel free to email me directly at csautomotivecars@att.net with your information and I will be happy to email you some further tests but you will need to have a digital volt/ohm meter for the next set of tests in order to diagnose the problem. Hope it's just one of those fises though. I hope this helps.....


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Posted on Sep 23, 2012

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