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Cooling fluid can not go around the system. - Cars & Trucks

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Big problem, get it towed somewhere for a cooling system flush, will probably run you about $150 or there abouts. dont drive it unless its an extremely short distance (under 2 miles) and if you do decide to drive it, watch your temp and do not let it get anywhere near the red zone as that could crack pistons or your engine block and it goes from a $150 fix to thousands.

Posted on Oct 27, 2012

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Could be any thing,Explain your self bettar, like what kind of vehicle is it,? Is it over Heating? It will not move in the system if the car is not runing.

Posted on Oct 27, 2012

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Hi What is the small looking radiator called that is down in front of the main radiator,On a 2002 td ford courier. Thanks, Tony.


Hello, since 2 days have left you without an answer I will try. There are several radiator looking fixtures around the engine radiator. One is a part of the A/C system and you can trace A/C hoses routing to it. The other is usually a power steering fluid cooler and you can find its hoses leading to the power steering pump.

The steering pump cooler is added because extra strain can be generated when backing up a trailer or parking in a tight spot. Heat thins out the fluid and can cause fluid foaming or lubrication problems.

A remote possibility is a transmission cooler, if the manufacturer wants a separate system for cooling transmission fluid. Usually trans coolers will route lines into the bottom of a radiator. But a manufacturer may have its reasons for hanging an air-cooled unit for an auxiliary heat reduction device.

Jan 15, 2018 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I replaced my water pump for my 2006 buick lucerne and now theres no heat


Hope you didn't break a nail.

There is a air pocket in the heater core, you just didn't burp it right.

Try this

  1. Open the hood of your car. Secure the hood with the safety handle. If you have a newer car, you should have a bleeder valve on the front of your radiator. Check in your owner's manual for the location of this valve. If you do start your car, open the valve with wrench and let your car heat up. The excess air will bleed out of your cooling system. Keep your car on long enough to give the (trapped air) time to bleed out of your system.
  2. Let your car cool down. Once the car is cool, take off the radiator cap. Did the level of the radiator fluid go down? If it did, it means you bled the air out of your cooling system. Replace the radiator fluid, turn on the car, and let it run. Replace radiator fluid as needed.
  3. Step 3 (above) is the way you will remove air from your cooling system if you do not have a bleeder valve on your radiator. You will leave the cap off the radiator. You will run your car until it heats up. As the air dissipates, the radiator fluid level will go down. You will fill up your radiator fluid to the correct level. Be careful because the heated radiator fluid will be hot. Always wear leather gloves and safety goggles when working on your radiator.
  4. Once the air dissipates and you fill the fluid, shut off the car. Let the car cool down. Once the car is cool, put the radiator cap back on the radiator. You may have to put more radiator fluid in the radiator. The level may fall as the car cools down. Now it is safe to drive your car. You have removed the trapped air from your cooling system.
Tips:
Always wear gloves and safety goggles when working on your radiator.
Radiator fluid gets very hot when heated.
Check radiator fluid periodically.

Apr 14, 2013 | 2006 Buick Lucerne

1 Answer

Glove box area 2002 jeep noise


I'm lost here.
You have a noise around or behind the glove box. And you say you have filled and bled the system.
The cooling system ??
How would the cooling system produce a noise in the cabin ?
Could the noise be the blower motor ?
Or something loose behind the glove box ? Does the noise happen when you are driving, or sitting still, or both ?

Jul 06, 2012 | 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

How do I bleed the radiator in my C70 Volvo ? you can bleed a radiator in a C70 , rite ?..


  1. This method works best if the nose of the car is raised as high as possible. Park your car in your driveway. Let your car cool down. When your car is cooled down, you are ready to work on the cooling system.
  2. Open the hood of your car. Secure the hood with the safety handle. If you have a newer car, you should have a bleeder valve on the front of your radiator. Check in your owner's manual for the location of this valve. If you do start your car, open the valve with wrench and let your car heat up. The excess air will bleed out of your cooling system. Keep your car on long enough to give the (trapped air) time to bleed out of your system.
  3. Let your car cool down. Once the car is cool, take off the radiator cap. Did the level of the radiator fluid go down? If it did, it means you bled the air out of your cooling system. Replace the radiator fluid, turn on the car, and let it run. Replace radiator fluid as needed.
  4. Step 3 (above) is the way you will remove air from your cooling system if you do not have a bleeder valve on your radiator. You will leave the cap off the radiator. You will run your car until it heats up. As the air dissipates, the radiator fluid level will go down. You will fill up your radiator fluid to the correct level. Be careful because the heated radiator fluid will be hot. Always wear leather gloves and safety goggles when working on your radiator.
  5. Once the air dissipates and you fill the fluid, shut off the car. Let the car cool down. Once the car is cool, put the radiator cap back on the radiator. You may have to put more radiator fluid in the radiator. The level may fall as the car cools down. Now it is safe to drive your car. You have removed the trapped air from your cooling system.

Jun 28, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2008 silverado the engine hot ac/ turned off alarmed on the DIC. I disconnected the battery and it went away for a feww days then came back. I disconnected battery again and same thing happened. I...


Are you saying the engine is overheating? If so, check out the cooling system (particularly the fluid, fluid level and thermostat). It is possible the temperature sensor failed again (maybe a wiring problem, incorrect or cheap sensor), but more likely the cooling system temperature is very close to the setting of the sensor, and depending on driving conditions, temperature could be bouncing up and down around the sensor setpoint.

Dec 19, 2017 | Chevrolet Silverado Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What is required in the 90K & 105K services


Action: Description

Inspect Cooling system hoses
Torque Body Fasteners
Inspect Idle speed
Inspect Exhaust system heat shields
Inspect Fuel lines
Inspect Emission System
Torque Frame Fasteners
Replace Air filter element
Inspect Drive Belt(s)
Change fluid Automatic transmission/transaxle
Inspect Parking brake
Inspect Ball joints
Drain, flush & refill Cooling system
Inspect Steering system
Inspect Brake system
Inspect Brake lines & hoses
Inspect Axle Shaft Oil Seal
Change fluid Rear differential
Inspect Driveshaft Universal Joint(s)
Inspect Constant Velocity Joint Boots
Change fluid Brake system
Replace Crankcase Oil Filter
Lubricate Door checks
Inspect fluid level Manual transmission/transaxle
Inspect fluid level Front differential
Inspect fluid level Transfer case
Inspect fluid level Rear differential
Change fluid Crankcase

Feb 09, 2011 | 2004 Kia Sorento

1 Answer

My jeep overheated lastnight..it got up to bout 250 so i parked it..i found antifreeze around the radiator cap(which was loose)...then noticed my upper radiator hose was flattened.....when i started it ...


Well, fortunately 250 is not extreme....So, no info on your year, so I will take a stab generically... Something happened. (duh), it could be it just got low on water, could be a leak...here are the next steps.

But first the upper rad hose may be a good clue: for a long time cooling systems had a recovery system...essentially, small amounts of coolant would be heated out, so this small amount of fluid was captured in a recovery system. This recovery system is outside of the pressurized cooling system....
Fluid goes into the recovery tank when hot, and this is normal. Then when the system COOLS, the radiator cap has a 2nd valve that alllows the coolant in the RECOVERY tank to be drawn back into the pressureized side.

The statement of the collapsed upper hose (replace it??) means this reverse system may be plugged or the cap is sticking...the function at this condition is that you would push heated fluid into the recovery tank and not get it back, so the next day you start the process short on fluid.....

So, look into that part, THEN fill with coolant to acheive the correct mix (if you put water you may want stronger % Coolant, when in doubt, drain it and start again with correct mix, it is important).

Heater on full at all fill and testing times. Pressure test the cooling system and look for leaks. Fix any that you find. Monitor the system...Thermostats need to be replaced routinely, in my opinion. Consider throwing on a rad cap and thermostat and have a good starting position to test and monitor the system.

Consider a flush of the cooling system...Easy at a lube shop and they recover the fluid.

Oct 18, 2010 | Jeep Grand Cherokee Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2002 honda odyssey


Normal maintenance schedule at 75,000 miles:
Replace transmission fluid.
replace engine oil.
Rotate tires.
replace engine oil filter.
inspect brakes.
check parking brake adjustment.
inspect tie rod ends, steering gearbox and boots.
inspect suspension components.
inspect driveshaft boots.
inspect brake hoses and lines.
check all fluid levels.
inspect cooling system hoses.
inspect exhaust system.
inspect fuel lines and connections.

(At 90,000 do all of above plus:
replace air cleaner element.
inspect and adjust drive belts.
replace cabin air filter.)

Mar 22, 2009 | 2002 Honda Odyssey

1 Answer

Auto transmission taking lots of fluid to fill


did you recently empty the tranni? like fluid or filter change? If not, there is a leak. I've seen the radiator go bad and tranni fluid gets forced into the cooling system. Check cooling system for reddish oily substance. If there is, replace radiator and refill tranni and cooling systems. may be a good idea to do cooling system flush.



Dec 11, 2008 | 1997 Chevrolet Astro

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