Question about 1983 Lincoln Mark VI

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The engine started overheating and now runs poorly n turns off and does not want to restart

Steam started coming out of the radiator as well and I believe that a belt broke off that went to the AC unit...

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  • Master
  • 417 Answers

Check for white frothy oil and/ coolant. You may have a blown head gasket or other head issues.

Posted on Oct 27, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

PegBox60965
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SOURCE: fishy, steam odor coming from AC vents

Forget the radiator tank. Your AC 'Condensate drain' hose is plugged up. This is a common problem. If you know where the hose comes out under the car you can ( carefully ) push a wire up it. If you're lucky it's plugged near the end by a mud-dauber wasp. If not, take it to your dealer and see if you can persuade the write-up guy to show you where the drain outlet is as a gesture of good faith. If they insist on charging you money, consider that when you buy your next car...

Posted on Dec 30, 2008

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1 Answer

What could be causing the overheated engine message come on when the coolant level is adequate and there is no steam coming from engine?


check the coolant level at the top tank radiator cap
check for an air lock in the cooling system
run the fault codes to check for problem sensors
have a compression test done to check head gasket and cracks

Oct 19, 2015 | 2005 Cadillac SRX

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Says its overheating but no steam


What does the temp gauge say ?
Is the engine getting too hot ? Radiator full of coolant ?

Jan 19, 2013 | 2008 GMC Sierra 1500

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STEAM COMING OFF ENGINE


check top radiator hose goes to thermostat housing sound like its leaking if your engine leaking from left driver side on top of engine it has to be top radiator thermostat hose leaking.wait until engine cool down replace top radiator hose see if coolant leaking still occur if so you could have radiator leak.

Dec 09, 2011 | 2002 Buick LeSabre

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Overheating


hello my8,
First confirm that the engine is actually overheating - steam, no heat to the interior etc. Sometimes a temperature sensor will fail and give a misleading 'overheat' reading on gauge. For that matter sometimes the gauge can fail and give the same misleading reading. Check that the cooling fan comes on when the engine temperature starts to rise above 'normal'. If not check (in order) fan fuse, fan relay, fan sensor, fan. Real overheating is caused by a lack of coolant AND/OR lack of coolant flow. Modern cooling systems are 'closed'. In other words there should be little or no loss of coolant. If the level is significantly low you have a leak....either external or internal. With the coolant topped up to the correct level and the radiator cap on, run the engine and look for visible leaks...hoses, valves, radiator etc. Internal leaks, eg. head gasket will usually be accompanied by white exhaust smoke (steam), hard starting, rough running and bubbles in the expansion tank. Sometimes, though NOT always, you will fiand the engine oil has a milky look and/or engine oil will be mixed in with the coolant.

Lack of coolant flow can be caused by anything in the system that causes an obstruction......in order of common occurance......thermostat stuck closed, radiator blockage, heater core blockage, water pump failure. One last point. because of design considerations many vehicles have the radiator mounted at a different level than the uppermost coolant passages in the engine thus trapping air in the coolant passages. In short the system must be bled of air in order to properly fill with coolant. Such systems will incorporate bleed screws usually in either the top/side of the radiator, the top hose, the thermostat housing and sometimes in all of these points. To bleed out the air do NOT run the engine as you fill the radiator. Instead, open all bleed screws. As you fill the radiator coolant will run out of one or more bleed points. Close this bleed point(s). Continue to fill until coolant escapes from the next bleed point then close that one. Proceed until coolant has escaped from ALL bleed points then continue to fill to the correct level. The expansion tank will have minimum and maximum level markings. Fill only to the minimum level mark with the engine cold.

hope helpful,
greetings

Nov 10, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car overheating


First confirm that the engine IS actually overheating - steam, no heat to the interior etc. Sometimes a temperature sensor will fail and give a misleading 'overheat' reading on gauge. For that matter sometimes the gauge can fail and give the same misleading reading. Check that the cooling fan comes on when the engine temperature starts to rise above 'normal'. If not check (in order) fan fuse, fan relay, fan sensor, fan. Real overheating is caused by a lack of coolant AND/OR lack of coolant flow. Modern cooling systems are 'closed'. In other words there should be little or no loss of coolant. If the level is significantly low you have a leak....either external or internal. With the coolant topped up to the correct level and the radiator cap on, run the engine and look for visible leaks...hoses, valves, radiator etc. Internal leaks, eg. head gasket will usually be accompanied by white exhaust smoke (steam), hard starting, rough running and bubbles in the expansion tank. Sometimes, though NOT always, you will find the engine oil has a milky look and/or engine oil will be mixed in with the coolant.

Aug 15, 2011 | Infiniti G35 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The fluid in radiator back up to the secondary plastic reservoir after 15 minutes when the car start. Then,steam came up on the tube located at the top of the plastic reservoir(that tube supose to drain...


Well, your vehicle is overheating. Are either of the electric fans running when the vehicle is turned on? Are you leaking any coolant around the water pump? When the vehicle is cooled off, feel of your main radiator hoses, the top one should be soft and pliable and the bottom one should be more rigid. It should feel like it has ribs in it. If it feels like the "ribs" in the bottom radiator hose are flattened and not round then you need to replace it. Also check the water level in the radiator when the vehicle is cooled off completely. You may just be really low on water. The overflow tank is only accurate when the radiator is full and working properly. Does the water blow out the overflow violently or just steam. If it is boiling out violently then you most likely have a bad head gasket. Check the exhaust when it is running and see if it is dripping water or releasing a lot of water vapor. If either is yes than you probably need head gaskets. Start with the easy problems and work your way up. Check every heater and water hose on the vehicle for leaks. Also take a flashlight and look all around the engine for steam after it has started overheating ( shut the car off first so you can hear the leaks and find them easier.). Don't take too long running it hot. It is mostly an aluminum engine and you can do major damage overheating it too much.

Apr 24, 2011 | 1990 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

Temp gauge light come on stating hot temp coolant, no steam from radiator, no light runs fine if heat is not on


Your engine is either overheating or your light is malfunctioning. The coolant may not necessarily "steam" from the radiator because the engine is overheating. The purpose of the light is to warn you of an overheating condition before it gets bad enough to cause your coolant to blow out the radiator cap. Severe engine damage can result from overheating. I would recommend having this problem diagnosed by a qualified technician that has the proper equipment required to to test and verify that your cooling system is functioning properly.

Jan 22, 2011 | 2001 Pontiac Aztek

1 Answer

1996 Acura 3.2TL Overheating Problem...


From your description of symtoms it sounds like you have a bad water pump. If the coolant is not circulating properly you will have a heating problem. Sometimes even a new thermostat can stick and cause the engine to overheat. I have seen them fail in as little as a week after they were installed.

Sep 13, 2009 | 1996 Acura TL Series

3 Answers

I have a 1996 Acura 3.2TL[V6] and it is overheating...


I had the same problem, whole new radiator, new hoses, new thermostat, and still overheating. What the problem was for me...bad radiator cap...all that money and a $20 fix...try it?

Sep 13, 2009 | 1996 Acura TL Series

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