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How do you replace the oil pan gasket seal on a 2004 S40 volvo 1.9 turno engine?

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

glennsmart
  • 798 Answers

SOURCE: oil leak?

Whoa whoa ... You've said that the car takes 7 quarts of oil. That's 14 pints. Depending on which engine variant is fitted, engine oil capacity is either:

  • 5.75 litres + 0.4 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • Turbo - 3.85 litres + 0.6 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • These figures are for a UK 3 litre version of the 960
If you've filled the car with 7 quarts of engine oil that's almost twice as much oil as should be in the engine. Did you mean pints when you wrote quarts?

If you've filled it with 7 quarts it's overfull. Way too full. Check your oil dipstick - remove it, wipe it clean and then dip the oil level. At the bottom of the dipstick there is a flattened wider part. The oil level should not be below the bottom of this marker, and nor should it be above it. If the oil level is way above the flattened marker bar - you're overfull and will have to drain some oil out of the engine. An overfilled engine will try and blow oil out from wherever it can as the oil system will over-pressurised.

Ok .. so there's no problem with the engine compression. The crankcase isn't overfilled with oil (the crankcase is known as the oil sump in the UK). There's no oil fouling of the plugs and the car isn't burning oil, just leaking it. There's no misfires or running

If the engine isn't overfilled with oil there may be a problem with a broken/sticking piston ring or piston/cylinder. That high oil loss you mention seems severe. A problem with a piston/ring/cylinder can allow the compression to leak past the rings/piston into the engine oil sump and pressurise it. Under pressure, the oil will try and leak to atmosphere from anywhere it can.

A blue smoky exhaust is also an indication of piston/ring problems. A quick check is to start the car. If there's a cloud of blue smoke at start up which clears quickly, it's like to be worn valve guides. If, when driving the car with a warm engine there's blue smoke on acceleration - it points to a problem with rings/piston.

A quick check is to remove the spark plugs. Is there engine oil on one or more of them? An oiled up plug indicates that the engine oil is finding its way up past the rings/piston - and if oil can find its way up to a spark plug, then exhaust gasses/compressed fuel/air can find its way into the engine oil sump and pressurise it.

Another quick check is to start the engine and remove the oil dipstick. If fumes are 'chugging' out of the tube or oil is spitting out, that's another sure-fire sign that the oil sump is becoming pressurised due to a piston ring/piston/cylinder problem.

If you possess or can borrow an engine compression tester there is a further test you can do yourself to confirm whether or not there are piston/ring problems. Basically, a compression tester is just a gauge that screws into the cylinder head in place of the spark plug.

Warm the engine for 5 minutes so that the pistons expand fully in the bores.
Remove the spark plugs
Fit the compression tester into No1 cylinder and crank the engine for 10 seconds. Make a note of the compression reading on the gauge.
Do the same for each cylinder.

Here's an example of what you might find (the figures are for example only)
Cylinder Reading
1 115
2 120
3 118
4 95
5 96
6 117

Figures vary, but there should not be more than a 10% difference between the readings.
In the example above you can see that cylinders 4 and 5 have readings that are well below those of the other cylinders. This is indicating problems within those two cylinders. The lower compression could be due to a head/gasket fault or piston ring/piston problem. A split or worn exhaust valve in the head may cause low compression, a misfire and uneven running but it won't cause the engine oil sump/crankcase to pressurise. Now, some fine tuning to locate the exact problem:

Put a liberal squirt of oil into each cylinder - something like Redex, WD40 or engine oil.Put a cloth over each spark plug hole and spin the engine to get rid of the excess oil. The idea is that the oil you have squirted into the piston bores will form a 'seal' around the outside of the piston/rings.

Do the compression tests again and note the readings. If the readings go up significantly it indicates that the rings/pistons/bore has a problem. Readings that go up significantly are due to the oil forming a seal around the piston which raises the compression whilst testing. Here's an example:Cylinder Reading on 1st test 2nd test
1 115 118
2 120 121
3 118 120
4 95 110 Significant rise - more than 10%
5 96 98
6 117 119

Ok .. all this means is that cylinder 4 has compression problems due to the rings/piston/bore. The 2nd compression reading (with the oil squirted in) is higher simply because the oil formed a seal. Cylinder number 5 still has a low reading which didn't increase significantly on the 2nd 'wet' (when oil is added) test. This suggests that the problem is an exhaust valve/head gasket/head problem.

If there had been no significant increase in the reading on number 4 cylinder, this would suggest valve/gasket head problem. Low readings on adjoining cylinders (and which don't increase with the 2nd compression 'wet' oil test) would indicate a faulty head gasket between those two cylinders.

I'll continue this article ... ran out of word space

Posted on Sep 18, 2008

  • 1596 Answers

SOURCE: Oil Pan Gasket Replacement - How to - GMC Yukon 2000








Removal Procedure

Important: The original oil pan gasket is retained and aligned to the oil pan by rivets. When installing a new gasket, it is not necessary to install new rivets.
DO NOT reuse the oil pan gasket. When installing the oil pan, install a NEW oil pan gasket.

Caution: Refer to Battery Disconnect Caution in Service Precautions.

  • Disconnect the negative battery cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnect/Connect Procedure
  • Remove the front differential if equipped with four wheel drive. Refer to Differential Carrier Assembly Replacement in Front Axle.
  • Remove the under body shield from the vehicle
  • Remove the oil pan underbody shield.
  • Remove the cross brace if equipped.
  • Drain the engine oil and remove the engine oil filter. Refer to Engine Oil and Oil Filter Change
  • Remove the lower transmission-to-oil pan bolts
  • Disconnect the oil level sensor electrical connector.
  • Remove two front wiring harness retainer bolts.


10. Remove the engine wiring harness retainer bolts from the engine oil pan.
11. Remove the engine oil cooler pipe to oil pan bolt.
12. Remove the transmission oil cooler pipe retainer and the bolt from the oil pan.
13. Remove the starter motor. Refer to Starter Motor Replacement.
14. Remove the left closeout cover and bolt.
15. Remove the engine oil pan. Refer to Oil Pan Removal.

Installation Procedure

Important: The alignment of the structural oil pan is critical. The rear bolt hole locations of the oil pan provide mounting points for the transmission bellhousing. To ensure the rigidity of the powertrain and correct transmission alignment, it is important that the rear of the block and the rear of the oil pan must NEVER protrude beyond the engine block and transmission bellhousing plane.

Will Send Remainder in another this place dont take kindly to larg files Your Email Address would realy be Better Then I could send Pictures Also up to YOU

Posted on Jan 27, 2009

  • 61 Answers

SOURCE: Oil Pan Gasket

Before removing the oil pan, drain all the oil from the car. You should be able to remove the pan with basic tools, not sure what socket size though. Once you have the pan off compare the new gasket with the new one to make sure it is the right one. Scrape off the old gasket and replace with the new using a high temp gasket sealant to attach the gasket. Bolt back on to the engine refilling with new oil and checking for leaks. NOTE: your oil pump is protected by your oil pan so be careful not to hurt while sliding in and out of place

Posted on May 09, 2009

terseo
  • 92 Answers

SOURCE: To change the oil pan gasket in a 93 Tercel

Stock the car doesn't come with an oil pan gasket but you can order one from rockauto.com you don't have to remove the A/C compressor for any of the jobs you listed. If you want to change the timing belt you need to remove the plastic rock guard under the motor on the passenger side. remove the spark plugs and using the socket turn the engine from the crankshaft clockwise until you are at TDC on #1 cyclinder. (compression stroke) Next remove the upper and lower plastic timing belt covers. The idler pulley is the one with the spring. Loosen the nut and remove the spring then you can remove the timing belt. It really isn't that hard to do. Maybe one afternoon.

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

  • 369 Answers

SOURCE: I replaced valve cover gaskets and camshaft seal

crankshaft seal rear main seal oil pressure sending unit to name a few you really have to look closely to locate your leak.

Posted on Dec 01, 2009

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Oil is leaking from enging


Hello and welcome to FixYa!

There are lot of reasons for engine leaks, here are the following:

- Loosen oil drain plug
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Please have the following checked and replaced if necessary. Hope this helps and thank you for using FixYa! Have a good one!

Jun 16, 2011 | Volvo S40 Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

Oil leak at the bottom of the oil pan. Still leaking after i tightend the pan bolt. What should i check next, can this cause other problems?


Dear Sir,
Here is the oil leaking Problem Identifying Technique

Engine oil leaks from the valve cover gasket are common.
  • The intake manifold plenum gasket may leak and cause increased oil consumption/burning and a spark knock during acceleration; the gasket should be replaced.
  • External oil leaks from valve cover gaskets, intake gaskets (front or rear), and the rear crankshaft (rear main) seal area are common. The rear main seal is an unlikely source. Normally, the bearing cap mating surfaces (as well as the sealing surface between the oil pan and bearing cap) are the source for the leaks.
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  • If the oil filter casing shows signs of distortion from excessive oil pressure, the oil pump should be replaced.
  • Often misdiagnosed as a leaking oil filter gasket, the oil filter adapter can seep from between the adapter and engine block.
  • Carbon buildup on the top of the piston is common. As the buildup increases with mileage and over time, symptoms may vary from light ticking, to ticking/hammering, to hammering/knocking noises. Fuel injector cleaner often solves the problem.

  • I think it helps to analyse u r Problem

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    http://volvospeed.com/vs_forum/index.php?showtopic=43652

    http://www.automedia.com/Sunroof_Rebuild/ccr20050101sr/1

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