Question about 1997 Nissan Maxima

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My car is leaking coolant and overheating i have a new radiator which has been pressure tested, a new harmonic balancer and new belts; whenever i put coolant in my car it spills right out and whenever i accelerate while turning my car overheats faster also my RPM guage is constantly on 8 what does thismean for my car?

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  • 59 Answers

If the radiator fluid spills out, then your test was not accurate. A radiator pressure test would certainly cause the fluid to leak during testing. If you had this tested at a garage, I would recommend returning there for a retest, as they didn't diagnose it correctly.

The other problems you mention can be caused by a few different things, but taking care of the problem you can clearly see should probably come first. If you have it checked at a garage that has not previously worked on your vehicle, be sure to tell them the recent work you have had done.

If you tested this yourself, ensure that the pressure tester is making a proper seal on the radiator cap nozzle and try to retest it. If it is pouring out as you say, the leak should be fairly easy to generally isolate, though if it is behind something, it may be difficult to completely pinpoint.

Posted on Oct 26, 2012

  • Shawn Desmond Oct 26, 2012

    I had the pressure test done at a garage and they told me that the leaking was coming form in between the engine block and headgasket the leaking didnt start until after they put my new radiator in but now they are telling me that they dont work on head gaskets or engine blocks and that my water pump is fine

  • Shawn Desmond Oct 26, 2012

    Thank you for all of your help hopefully i can put your advice to some good use but im weary about using this mechanic again i just got my car and havent been able to really drive it because no one knows whats wrong with it

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Hello, I own a 2000

Sounds like a blown head gasket from multiple overheatings. Parts retailers have a chemical that can determine this. To use it the coolant level in the radiator needs to be a little low so no coolant will be pulled into chemical container. Engine needs to be at operating temperature. The containter is pushed onto radiator cap opening and bulb squeezed numerours times for about 2 minutes. If the chemical changes from blue to yellow (or green depending on manufacturer) then the head gasket is blown or head has warped (or both).

Posted on May 03, 2009

  • 341 Answers

SOURCE: 1990 nissan sentra overheating

it sounds like a water pump not circulating antifreeze properly

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

michigan man
  • 3533 Answers

SOURCE: Radiator leak

it will not cause the radiator to explode but it can cause the car to overheat. just keep checking the antifreeze level before you take off and add some if below the cold mark. fill to the cold mark and you should be fine till you can afford a new radiator if you have a salvage yard around you check there for a good used one it will be alot cheaper

Posted on Feb 18, 2009

  • 4369 Answers

SOURCE: ''does a new radiator need refrigerant added to it''

You need to replace the condensor, then take it to a shop to have the a/c system evacuated and recharged to purge moisture because the system was opened. That will cost around $150. You do not need to replace the receiver/dryer/suction accumulator even though they will tell you that you do.
go to car-part.com to find prices of condensor from salvage yards. Page with asterisk on it is the lowest priced part.

--------------------------------------
The Refrigerant Cycle
During stabilized conditions (air conditioning system shutdown), the refrigerant is in a vaporized state and pressures are equal throughout the system. When the A/C compressor (19703) is in operation it increases pressure on the refrigerant vapor, raising its temperature. The high-pressure and high-temperature vapor is then released into the top of the A/C condenser core (19712).
The A/C condenser core, being close to ambient temperature, causes the refrigerant vapor to condense into a liquid when heat is removed from the refrigerant by ambient air passing over the fins and tubing. The now liquid refrigerant, still at high pressure, exits from the bottom of the A/C condenser core and enters the inlet side of the A/C evaporator core orifice (19D990).
The A/C evaporator core orifice is the restriction in the refrigerant system that creates the high pressure buildup in the A/C evaporator core (19860) and separates the high and low pressure sides of the A/C system. As the liquid refrigerant leaves this restriction, its pressure and boiling point are reduced.
The liquid refrigerant is now at its lowest pressure and temperature. As it passes through the A/C evaporator core, it absorbs heat from the passenger compartment airflow passing over the plate/fin sections of the A/C evaporator core. This addition of heat causes the refrigerant to boil (convert to gas). The now cooler passenger compartment air can no longer support the same humidity level of the warmer air and this excess moisture condenses on the exterior of the evaporator coils and fins and drains outside the vehicle.
The suction accumulator/drier (19C836) is designed to remove moisture from the refrigerant and to prevent any liquid refrigerant that may not have been vaporized in the A/C evaporator core from reaching the A/C compressor. The A/C compressor is designed to pump refrigerant vapor only, as liquid refrigerant will not compress and can damage the A/C compressor.
The refrigerant cycle is now repeated with the A/C compressor again increasing the pressure and temperature of the refrigerant.
The A/C cycling switch (19E561) interrupts compressor operation before the external temperature of the A/C evaporator core gets low enough to cause the condensed water vapor (excess humidity) to turn to ice. It does this by monitoring low side line pressure. It is known that a refrigerant pressure of approximately 210 kPa (30 psi) will yield an operating temperature of 0°C (32°F). The A/C cycling switch controls system operation in an effort to maintain this temperature.
The high side line pressure is also monitored so that A/C compressor operation can be interrupted if system pressure becomes too high.
The A/C compressor pressure relief valve (19D644) will open and vent refrigerant to relieve unusually high system pressure.
Clutch Cycling Orifice Tube Type Refrigerant System 75cc8eb.gif
Item Part Number Description 1 19E762 A/C charge valve port (low side) 2 19E561 A/C cycling switch 3 19C836 Suction accumulator/drier 4 19703 A/C compressor 5 19D644 A/C compressor pressure relief valve 6 19D594 A/C pressure cut-off switch 7 19E762 A/C charge valve port (high side) 8 19712 A/C condenser core 9 19D990 A/C evaporator core orifice 10 19860 A/C evaporator core 11 — Low pressure vapor 12 — High pressure vapor 13 — Low pressure liquid 14 — High pressure liquid

  1. Connect the R-134a A/C Refrigerant Center to the low- and high-pressure service gauge port valves.
  2. Evacuate the system until the low-pressure gauge reads at least 99.4 kPa (29.5 in-Hg) (vacuum) and as close as 101.1 kPa (30 in-Hg) as possible. Continue to operate the vacuum pump for a minimum of 45 minutes.
  3. Turn off the evacuation pump. Observe the low-pressure gauge for five minutes to make sure that the system vacuum is held. If vacuum is not held for five minutes, leak-test the system, service the leaks, and evacuate the system again.
  4. Correctly oil match the system to verify that the correct amount of refrigerant oil is present in the system. For additional information, refer to Refrigerant Oil Adding in this section.
  5. Charge the system with the specified weight of refrigerant and refrigerant oil.
  6. When no more refrigerant is being drawn into the system, start the engine and select MAX A/C operation. Set the blower motor speed to maximum and allow the remaining refrigerant to be drawn into the system. Continue to add refrigerant into the system until the specified weight of R-134a has been added. Close the charging cylinder valve and allow the system to pull any remaining refrigerant from the hose. When the suction pressure drops to approximately 207 kPa (30 psi), close the charging hose valve.

Posted on May 14, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Hi, my 2004 nissan pulsar is overheating. has a

Hey there,
I've just had an ongoing problem with my 1990 Pulsar overheating.
Mechanics checked everything: electric fan, airlocks, leaks, etc
Car continued overheating intermittently for months - finally the mechanic put a non standard thermostat in, one which activates at a slightly lower temp that stock.
Problem is now resolved.
Hope this helps,
Michael

Posted on Jul 22, 2009

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Why did my 2011 DTS Cadillac overheat?


An overheated engine can be caused by anything that decreases the cooling system's ability to absorb, transport and dissipate heat; therefore engines can overheat for a variety of reasons. Let's take a look at some of the most common causes.
Cooling System Leaks
This is the primary cause of engine overheating. Possible leak points include hoses, the radiator, water pump, thermostat housing, heater core, head gasket, freeze plugs, automatic transmission oil cooler, cylinder heads and block. Perform a pressure test. A leak-free system should hold pressure for at least one minute.
Wrong Coolant Concentration
Be sure to use the coolant recommended by your vehicle's manufacturer. The wrong type of coolant and/or mixing the incorrect concentration of coolant and distilled water can also result in engine overheating. The best bet is to perform a complete flush and fill.
Bad Thermostat
A thermostat is a heat-sensitive valve that opens and closes in response to engine temperature. Heated engine coolant passes through to the radiator when the thermostat is in the open position. In the closed position, it prevents the flow of coolant to speed up the warming of a cold engine. When the thermostat gets stuck in the closed position, coolant stays in the engine and quickly becomes overheated, resulting in engine overheating.
Blocked Coolant Passageways
Rust, dirt and sediment can all block or greatly impede the flow of coolant through the cooling system. This can limit the system's ability to control engine temperature, which may result in higher operating temperatures and engine overheating. Once again, a flush and fill is recommended to remove debris.
Faulty Radiator
By passing through a series of tubes and fins, coolant temperature is reduced in the radiator. Leaks and clogging are some of the most common causes of radiator failure. Any disruption in the radiator's function can lead to elevated engine temperature and overheating.
Worn/Burst Hoses
A hose that contains visual cracks or holes, or has burst will result in leaks and disrupt the flow of engine coolant. This can result in overheating.
Bad Radiator Fan
A fan blows air across the radiator fins to assist in reducing the temperature of the coolant. A fan that wobbles, spins freely when the engine is off, or has broken shrouds will not be able to reduce the temperature to proper level, thus possibly resulting in engine overheating.
Loose or Broken Belt
A belt is often the driving link that turns the water pump at the correct speed for proper coolant flow through the cooling system. If a belt is loose or broken, it cannot maintain the proper speed, thus resulting in poor coolant flow and ultimately, engine overheating.
Faulty Water Pump
Known as the 'heart' of the cooling system, the water pump is responsible for pressurizing and propelling engine coolant through the cooling system. Any malfunction of the water pump, including eroded impeller vanes, seepage or wobble in the pump shaft, can prevent adequate coolant flow and result in engine overheating.

Oct 13, 2016 | 2011 Cadillac DTS

1 Answer

Why is my honda passport running hot?


The most common cause other than what you have replaced is a leaking head gasket.
Could also be a coolant flow problem inside the engine, or air flow thru the radiator.

Sep 05, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Overheating


Overheating can be "boiled" down to a few issues:
*blockage: Something is stopping or slowing the flow. Main suspect is the thermostat. It is designed to open and close at the proper temperature so as to keep the engine at the optimum temperature range. They have a tendency to lock closed and cause overheating. Sometimes it's random. The blockage may be something like sludge or rust in the radiator or gunk that someone put in that does not agree with it.

*coolant/water loss. A leak somewhere. Blown head gasket, cracked head/block, hose, etc.
*pressure loss. This happens when the water gets to boiling temperature but is kept under control by pressure (pressure resists heat) and then something such as the radiator cap releases the pressure and the temperature rises. The coolant will also leak out and then the overheating will be due coolant loss as well. This is especially true with the Cadillac Northstar. The head bolts allow the head to lift off the block, ever so slightly, and pressurize the coolant system with exhaust gases beyond radiator cap pressure limits. It's usually when you accelerate or put the engine under load such as going up hill.

^check for exhaust gases in the coolant. smell it or buy a kit to test.
^get a new thermostat, or, test the old one by boiling it in water on the stove; see if it opens. I always get the "failsafe" kind: fails in the open position.
^check for oil in the coolant or coolant in the oil: grey sludge.
^check for leaks on the ground.
^test the radiator cap. some part stores have a way to test them.
^check to see if it's made by Cadillac. look for the word Northstar. If so, hold on to your wallet. There's a whole new world of overheating adventures.

Oct 27, 2013 | 2001 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

Overheating


Doesn't sound like it ran hot enough or long enough to crack or warp the head. If there is a crack, the engine will continue to overheat. If a warped head, car would probably run rough, the affected cylinders would likely have little or no compression, there would be a noticeable miss, and overheating would continue.
Why the low coolant? It's a sealed system, so should never have to add coolant, other than a small loss from evaporation in the overflow tank. Monitor the level closely for the next few days. Note the level in the overflow tank to see if it drops over time. Leaks can be external anywhere in the coolant system-engine, radiator, hoses, heater core- or internal in the engine-head gasket failures can cause coolant in the cylinders (white smoke out the exhaust), or coolant in the oil (oil will have a milky brown look to it), or oil in the coolant (will see traces of oil in the radiator).
A couple of tests may be called for. A pressure test of the coolant system will check if the system holds pressure as it should-about 15 psi. If pressure does not hold, there is a leak somewhere. Water pumps usually leak through the weep hole when they fail. A radiator leak would show up when pressure is applied. If pressure does hold, check if you have a good radiator cap-the cap is what seals the system so pressure will maintain. Coolant under pressure raises it's boiling point by about 10 degrees, so is critical to keep the system under pressure.
If you suspect further problems-losing coolant or continued overheating-then have the chemical test done to check for exhaust gasses in the coolant. Basically a check if the head gasket is good, a simple test done at the radiator cap opening with a special fluid that changes color if hydrocarbons are present in the cooling system.
Or you could have a compression test of the cylinders to check the internal mechanical condition-not only tells you if head gasket is good, also tells you a lot about engine condition-even,. balanced, good compression in all cylinders translates into good power output-rings are good, valves are sealing good, all systems go.
The cooling system: water pump, thermostat, radiator, hoses, heater core and hoses, radiator cap, overflow tank, and the cooling fans and associated wiring. Make sure everything is working right and you'll be good to go.

Sep 17, 2013 | 1994 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

2003 hyundai elentra overheating and already did alot of standard procedures to fix the problem and still overheats. Car vurrently has 64k on it. Here is the history. Last year it overheated and changed...


The only other thing I can think of is maybe you put in the wrong kind of coolant? Not every type of coolant works in every car. Other than that, try head gasket sealer because if your head gasket is leaking, it can't be a big leak, otherwise you'd have problems right away.

Jul 17, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Harmonic balancer /water pump


most water pumps I believe have a weep hole that drips out coolant basically letting the person owning the car know that it is time to change the water pump. but then again have you checked to see if the water pump hoses are secure and aren't cracked?

Jul 06, 2013 | Honda Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 97 nissan maxima that is leaking coolant immediately after i put it in. i have a new radiator and have had the hoses checked and a pressure tests done on the radiator also the heat in the car


if you cant see it leaking, it could just need a coolant system flush to clear anything out that could be clogging it. get it towed to a shop to get it flushed. if you see it leaking, find the source and correct it! look at the drain plug at the bottom corner of the radiator, could be lose which would cause massive amounts of loss because thats where it is emptied for normal maintenance.

Oct 26, 2012 | 1997 Nissan Maxima

1 Answer

How do i change the water pump which way does the pulley screw on the harmonic balancer turn in order to loosen the pulley?


You need a harmonic balancer puller to remove the harmonic balancer. Most auto parts stores that offer loaner tools will have one for you to use and they should have directions if you've never used one before. To replace a water pump, first drain your coolant, remove belt, unbolt and remove water pump, scrape old gasket material from block surface. Place your bolts into new pump, slide gaskets over bolts then attach to engine, reverse other steps, make sure to close radiator petcock (drain valve) fill with 50/50 coolant mixture and start your vehicle to make sure gaskets aren't leaking any coolant

Feb 02, 2011 | 1991 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Overheating bubbleling in resevoir


bubbling into the overflow may mean a head gasket is gone, it may also mean the radiator or thermostat is blocked. or there is a leak
Clean and flush radiator, check the radiator fins for corrosion
pressure test coolant system
(if this is ok then)
new thermostat
new coolant

May 09, 2010 | 1994 Pontiac Bonneville

1 Answer

1992 Honda Civic over heating replace theormostat - still overheating air bubbles in overflow jug and in radiator when running with cap off...


here is a check list for common overheating issues low coolant? Any leaks? A headgasket leak? To test that use a coolant mix tester. Do the cooling fans run with the engine hot? Is the rad cap holding pressure? This can be tested usually its easier to swap it with a working one or buy new. Lastly the waterpump and timing belt. If the timing belt if old/high mileage or the tensioner faulty it can cause overheating. The common practice is to replace the timing belt every 100,000miles along with the waterpump and the belt tensioner

Dec 28, 2008 | 1991 Honda Civic

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