Question about 2007 Suzuki XL-7

4 Answers

Suzuki XL-7 (2007)Heater control

The main heater control holds the temperature either at 16°C or 31°C. No adjustment possible. The one in the second row seats works perfectly. Went to dealer 3 times and they can't find the problem. Help!

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  • cindylapierr Jul 17, 2009

    Didn't want you to think we thought your solution wasn't good. We do have difficulties with the dealer to look into the problem. We wanted to have a few advices before we went back, just in case. Thanks for the advice. We will be back to tell you what really happened.

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4 Answers

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  • Suzuki Master
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This sounds like you have a problem with the air temperature control electric blend door actuator motor, this is what controls air temp, the part moves the door that sets between the heater core and ac evaporator core to mix the two hot and cold air sources for the desired temp at the ac or heater outlets. this part is buried deep in the dash and very difficult to replace as the dash must be removed to get at it for replacement.

Posted on Jul 14, 2009

  • yadayada
    yadayada Jul 15, 2009

    how do u know this is not the problem?, just to educate u this is the most common cause of air temp control issues no matter what the car line, they all use electric actuators (known as stepper motors) for the blend door. I have been an automotive AC expert for 30 years now and this is what I have seen most often followed by the AC control head in the dash.

  • yadayada
    yadayada Jul 15, 2009

    I would also like to here what you think the problem is since you rejected my advise with no comment

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  • Master
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Hello Cindy. If you drive to any autozone they can put your car on their scanner and should be able to pinpoint the problem. Although I am not a Suzuki Tech. I suspect that there is a separate relay for the front and the rear heaters. My money goes on replacing the relay that controls the front or main heater.

Posted on Jul 15, 2009

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  • Master
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Heater control unit needs to be checked .the heater control has a thermostat for the heater only. that thermostat needs to be checked and replaced.

Posted on Jul 15, 2009

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  • Master
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On the newer models... The heater core always has maximum water flow going through it. There is a door in the HVAC system that either entirely isolates the core from the air flow or diverts varying amounts of the air through the heat exchanger.
The door is operated by an electric stepper motor; the knob is technically a position sensor.
------------
Some heater/defrost controls are mechanically controled and some are vacuum actuated. Look under the passenger side dash and see if you can locate the means by which the flapper is controlled. Normally the flapper just redirects the heated air from the rotating fan to eith go out the vents or up to the vents in the defrost. Most mechanic units (attached by cables from the dash control unit) do not break or wear out. The vacuum operated ones sometimes the small vacuum hoses that attach to a solenoid come off or get brittle and loose their seal against the plastic tips. If you can work the dash controls while you look under the dash and try to see how and why the flapper is not moving, then maybe you can ascertain how the flapper is actuated. Last resort os to try to remove the in dash control unit. It will either have the mechanical cables attached or vacuum lines attached to it so be careful when removing. Once you control the flapper in the air box, then you norally can redirect the air to where it needs to be. Look for a cracked vacuum line by the master cylinder. There are several that interconnect which feed through the firewall and into the dash that supply all of the dash vacuum
------------
keep updated.thanks.

Posted on Jul 14, 2009

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1 Answer

Where is the air and heat blend motor on a 2000 dodge dakota?


Hi Sharon, I'm glad to help. Your 2000 year doesn't have a motor for the temp door. It operated by a cable running from the control head to the temp door and you work it manually. If you can't control the temperature from hot to cold, sometimes the cable come off or breaks. Here how you can see the cable to see if its working. Remove the radio and right behind it you will see the cable attached to the door, while watching it move the temp lever from hot to cold and watch it. If it is moving then its most likely out of ajustment. If it is not moving, then you'll need a new cable. Just in case it is moving, I'm attaching the instruction on how to adjust it below. Hope this helps and have an awesome day Sharon!



TEMPERATURE CONTROL CABLE

Any time the heater-A/C control or the temperature control cable are removed and/or replaced, the following procedure must be performed.
  1. The temperature control cable housing and core must be installed at both the heater-A/C control and the heater-A/C housing ends, and the heater-A/C control must be installed in the instrument panel. See Heater-A/C Control and Temperature Control Cable in the Removal and Installation section of this group for the procedures.
  2. Rotate the temperature control knob on the heater-A/C control so that the knob pointer is in the 12 o'clock position.
  3. Pull the temperature control knob straight out from the heater-A/C control base until the perimeter of the knob (not the knob pointer) protrudes about 6 millimeters (0.25 inch) from the face of the control base.
  4. Rotate the temperature control knob to the 1 o'clock position. Push in on the knob slightly and continue rotating the knob to its full clockwise stop. The knob pointer should be aimed at a position about 8 millimeters (0.315 inch) beyond the end of the graduated red strobe temperature control graphic on the face of the heater-A/C control base. If the knob is not pointed to the correct position, go back to Step 2 and repeat the adjustment procedure.
  5. Rotate the temperature control knob counterclockwise until the knob pointer is in the 12 o'clock position again.
  6. Push the temperature control knob straight in towards the heater-A/C control base until the perimeter of the knob (not the knob pointer) is flush with the face of the heater-A/C control base.
  7. Rotate the knob to its full clockwise stop again. The knob pointer should be aimed at the end of the graduated red strobe temperature control graphic on the face of the heater-A/C control base. If OK, go to Step 8. If not OK, go back to Step 2.
  8. Rotate the knob to its full counterclockwise stop and release the knob. If the knob springs back from the counterclockwise stop, the self-adjuster clip that secures the temperature control cable to the blend-air door lever is improperly installed. See Temperature Control Cable in the Removal and Installation section of this group for the procedures. If the knob does not spring back, the temperature control cable adjustment is complete.

May 14, 2014 | Dodge Dakota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car heater not working blowing cold air


If you smell antifreeze in the passenger compartment its probably the heater core. If not, its possibly the control head that adjusts the temperature.

Jan 27, 2014 | Chevrolet Astro Cars & Trucks

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Heat not working


Sounds like the air blend door is not opening to let heat in.

Engine coolant is provided to the heater system by two 16 mm (5/8 inch inside diameter) heater hoses. With the engine idling at normal running temperature, set the heater-A/C controls as follows. Temperature control to full Heat, Mode control to Floor, Blower control to the highest speed setting. Using a test thermometer, check the air temperature coming from the center floor outlets and compare this reading to the Temperature Reference table.

If the floor outlet air temperature is insufficient, check that the cooling system is operating to specifications. Both heater hoses should be HOT to the touch (the coolant return hose should be slightly cooler than the supply hose). If the coolant return hose is much cooler than the supply hose, locate and repair the engine coolant flow obstruction in heater system.

POSSIBLE LOCATIONS OR CAUSE OF OBSTRUCTED COOLANT FLOW
If coolant flow is verified and the heater floor outlet temperature is insufficient, a mechanical problem may exist.

POSSIBLE LOCATION OR CAUSE OF INSUFFICIENT HEAT
  • Obstructed cowl air intake.
  • Obstructed heater system outlets.
  • Blend-air door not functioning properly.
TEMPERATURE CONTROL
If heater floor outlet temperature cannot be adjusted with the heater-A/C control temperature control lever, one of the following could require service:

Jan 21, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is the heater blend door actuator on 2007 Suzuki xl7? I am getting cold air when the heat is on


front or rear, the rear is a complex option.
in the heater box.
the 2007 FSM covers this best, all the tests and all steps to service.
10 tests there,
blend door, is that the recirc door? or temperature.
step 5 shows recir, checks.

the 07 automatic HVAC options, has 5 motors,
2 motors in rear, heat and mode
3 in the front, mode, Circ, and temp.

if the doors mess up, its caused by the door (damper jam)
motor jam, or controls ( no need to mention wires or connectors, as that is always true, for electrics)
its a complex system very much like on new honda's
id not attempt to work on it with out the FSM
or a subscription to alldata.com or mitchels.

its not a simple cable system like the old Suzukis/ at all.

Nov 19, 2013 | 2007 Suzuki XL-7

3 Answers

I put a brand new heater core, radiator, water pump an thermastat but it still takes forever to blow heat out an then it doesn't get that hot.. what's the problem? my vehicle is a 1995 jeep wrangler 2.5 4...


Could be the heater bypass valve is stuck or the heater core is blocked.
I'd check the heater core first.You may have trapped air in the cooling system or the heater core may be partially plugged up. Engine coolant is delivered to the heater core through two heater hoses. With the engine idling at normal operating temperature, set the temperature control knob in the full hot position, the mode control switch knob in the floor heat position, and the blower motor switch knob in the highest speed position. Using a test thermometer, check the temperature of the air being discharged at the HVAC housing floor outlets.
Temperature Reference
Ambient Air Temperature 15.5° C (60° F) 21.1° C (70° F) 26.6° C (80° F) 32.2° C (90° F)
Minimum Air Temperature at Floor Outlet 52.2° C (126° F) 56.1° C (133° F) 59.4° C (139° F) 62.2° C (144° F)
If the floor outlet air temperature is too low, Both of the heater hoses should be hot to the touch. The coolant return heater hose should be slightly cooler than the coolant supply heater hose. If the return hose is much cooler than the supply hose, locate and repair the engine coolant flow obstruction in the cooling system.
OBSTRUCTED COOLANT FLOW
Possible locations or causes of obstructed coolant flow: Pinched or kinked heater hoses. Improper heater hose routing. Plugged heater hoses or supply and return ports at the cooling system connections. A plugged heater core. If proper coolant flow through the cooling system is verified, and heater outlet air temperature is still low, a mechanical problem may exist.
MECHANICAL PROBLEMS
Possible locations or causes of insufficient heat: An obstructed cowl air intake. Obstructed heater system outlets. A blend door not functioning properly.
TEMPERATURE CONTROL
If the heater outlet air temperature cannot be adjusted with the temperature control knob on the A/C Heater control panel, the following could require service: The A/C Heater control. The blend door actuator.
The blend door. Improper engine coolant temperature

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1 Answer

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The heater core is possibly blocked or the temperature adjuster is not working.

First check the controls to be certain that the temperature aduster is working and the flaps/doors that direct the flow of hot air are working.

If they are..........

Check heater hose temp. If one is hot and one is cold, you are not getting flow through the heater core.

Bleed it to remove an air blockage.
If that does not work, flush the system.
If that does not work, replace the heater core.

Karl at topgunwon.com

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If the heater outlet air temperature cannot be
adjusted with the temperature control knob(s) on the
A/C Heater control panel, the following could require
service:
- The A/C heater control.
-The blend door actuator(s).
-The wire harness circuits for the A/C heater control
or the blend door actuator(s).
-The blend door(s).
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My 2001 toyota tundra heater wont blow hot air. I checked to see if the heater core is cloged it seems fine the heater control valve is operating properly, and I changed the thermastat. and yet the heater...


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2001 Suzuki XL-7. Heater blows hot one side, cold the other.


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Service center time, unless you are handy with your own repairs.

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